Aaron7893

Judy Garland Movies

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Judy Garland movies.

 

Is that all you have to say?    :D

 

Hey,  I'm a big fan of Judy (#1 female entertainer of the 20th century IMO).     Many fine film performances.   

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Judy Garland, who to me is the greatest entertainer of all time, made so many movies that made such an indelible impression on me. She could do it all and here are some of my favorite Judy performances in film:

 

A Star Is Born

The Wizard of Oz

The Clock

For Me And My Gal

I Could Go On Singing

Easter Parade

Presenting Lily Mars

All the films Judy made with Mickey Rooney

Summer Stock

Meet Me In St. Louis

The Harvey Girls

Ziegfeld Girl

Judgment At Nuremburg

 

 

Judy, Judy, Judy - There's never been anyone like you.

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I've always held Judy's voice as the standard by which any other female vocalist should be held, and since she bore a close resemblance(or maybe it was the other way around) to a beloved cousin of mine, I always delight in seeing her movies.

 

They weren't ALL great, mind you, but none were so bad as to do one's best to AVOID seeing any of them, so I'm with you!

 

 

Sepiatone

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I'm not sure whether the OP wants us to focus on favorite Judy Garland films to get recommendations or to discuss her films as a whole, or what... I do like open ended topics however, so I'll just go with it and provide a stream of consciousness about Judy Garland.

 

I really like Judy Garland.  She's one of my favorites.  While primarily cast in musicals, she proved herself very adept in dramatic roles.  One of my favorites of her "non singing" movies is The Clock.  It's a very no-frills film--just a simple, straight-forward romantic film costarring Robert Walker.  I wish MGM had cast Garland in more films like this. 

 

Another of her great roles was in A Star is Born.  While Garland does sing, it's quite a different performance than her usual happy musicals.  Garland performs an amazing rendition of the torch song, "The Man That Got Away." As much as I like Grace Kelly, Garland was robbed of her Oscar for her performance in this film. 

 

As for Garland's musicals for which she's primarily known, my favorite is probably Easter Parade with Fred Astaire.  However, I also loved Meet Me in St. Louis, For Me and My Gal, Summer Stock, The Pirate, Presenting Lily Mars, The Harvey Girls and of course, The Wizard of Oz.

 

I'm not a fan of Garland's musicals with frequent co-star Mickey Rooney.  While I always enjoy Garland's contributions to these films, I find Rooney so irritating that it makes the film a chore to watch. 

 

I agree with JamesJazz and Marsha's assertion that Garland is the #1 female entertainer of the 20th century.  Her voice is so unique and so beautiful that you can't help but be entranced by it.  Her voice is so full of raw emotion that you're captivated through the entirety of the song.  Even in a lesser film (like Summer Stock, for example), her musical numbers elevate the film from forgettable to being memorable and entertaining. 

 

It's a shame that she was never able to surround herself with the right people and as a result, had many insecurities and problems in her personal life, which later affected her professional life.  It's amazing that in her films (where she regularly had so many problems) that she was able to turn in such fantastic performances each and every time.  It's a true testament to her talent.

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I love IN THE GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME.  It is my favorite film version of that story.  I am not an avid Judy fan, and find her to be a better actress than singer.  Oddly, I saw her in concert, twice.  The first time was the famous Carnegie Hall concert, although I saw it a week later at Philadelphia's Academy of Music,  The next time I saw her, was at her last US concert (although no one knew it would be her last, at the time).  Though the first concert was a more polished, showy affair, the last one was much more special.  She appeared as the headliner of a concert that included Jackie Wilson, Count Basie and his Orchestra (who also accompanied Judy); and, The New York Electronic String Ensemble.  It was presented in the cavernous Municipal Stadium in Philadelphia, which by the time was called JFK Stadium.  Just before she appeared to do her set and close the show, a few of us, unplanned, went all the way down to the foot of the runway that was erected for the concert (and, especially for her, as no one else used it).  We were, litterally at her feet.   She came out did her opening number, then told us about the dress she was wearing, which was red; and how proud that she had made it, herself.  Then, she just started to speak to us, as if we were sitting her in living room.  One of us would answer, then she'd say something else, then do another number. I remember after so many songs, saying to her, "So, no Over the Rainbow?" and she looked me straight in the eyes and said, "Oh, honey, we ALWAYS get to that one!"   In that enormous stadium that easily sat 100,000 people, we had the most initimate time with Judy Garland.  All these years later, it still seems so surreal, and very special. 

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I love your story, John.   How special a memory of that show.

 

I am so glad someone mentioned The Clock.  Judy is absolutely believable in it, I totally buy her character.  It is a a very difficult story to sell.   She and Robert Walker work the chemistry beautifully, and James Gleason's role is such a sweet ensemble bit of work. 

 

clock2.jpg

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Hi, I am new to this forum, although I have been a fervent TCM viewer for many years. I actually discovered this thread via a mention of it on a Judy Garland message board. I've loved reading everyone's posts and feel similarly about Judy's extraordinary talent and timeless legacy.

 

I am a lifelong Judy fan, thanks to my Mom, who as a teenager in the 1960s idolized Judy. I feel blessed that she introduced me to so many of Judy's films; one early memory is her asking me to watch with her a late-night showing of The Pirate on TV (this was before TCM, lol). I was 6 or 7 at the time, and although I'm sure I had already seen The Wizard of Oz by then, it was eye-opening to see ''Dorothy'' in a whole different light. Through the years, my inherited deep love and appreciation grew with each Judy film I saw under my Mom's tutelage, including For Me and My Gal, Meet Me in St. Louis, The Clock, A Child Is Waiting and my Mom's favorite, Summer Stock. She's never been a huge fan of the Andy Hardy films for some reason, though, so I only saw those relatively recently. (TCM has been a godsend for that reason alone, which is why I was disappointed that there were no Judy films aired on the 93rd anniversary of her birth on June 10. I can understand the importance of TCM honoring Hattie McDaniel's birthday that same day, I just wish that TCM could have honored them both with mini movie marathons.)

 

johnm001, it was thrilling to read your recollections of attending Judy's concerts, thank you for sharing. Just in case you were unaware, or for anyone else here who would like to hear it, there is soundboard-quality audio of that 1968 concert available to listen to here: [...]
 

Edited by TCMModerator1
Removed link to full audio

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I was completely unaware of that recording!!  Although that recording is edited, it was exciting to hear it, after all these years.  Much of what we said to her is not there, plus I believe a song or two is missing.  Her talking about her dress isn't there, either.  Still, I'm amazed it exists, at all! Thanks for the link.  That concert was exactly $1.00, to attend.  A bargin, even in 1968!  It was sponsored by Schmidt's Beer, The City of Philadelphia, and a couple of others

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I was completely unaware of that recording!!  Although that recording is edited, it was exciting to hear it, after all these years.  Much of what we said to her is not there, plus I believe a song or two is missing.  Her talking about her dress isn't there, either.  Still, I'm amazed it exists, at all! Thanks for the link.  That concert was exactly $1.00, to attend.  A bargin, even in 1968!  It was sponsored by Schmidt's Beer, The City of Philadelphia, and a couple of others

You are welcome (though I'm sorry that it was an edited version and also that the link to the audio has been removed.) Wow, a dollar, that's incredible! Thanks again for sharing your memories of seeing Judy. :)

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On Friday, June 26, 2015 at 10:31 AM, MarshaKatz said:

Judy Garland, who to me is the greatest entertainer of all time, made so many movies that made such an indelible impression on me. She could do it all and here are some of my favorite Judy performances in film:

 

A Star Is Born

The Wizard of Oz

The Clock

For Me And My Gal

I Could Go On Singing

Easter Parade

Presenting Lily Mars

All the films Judy made with Mickey Rooney

Summer Stock

Meet Me In St. Louis

The Harvey Girls

Ziegfeld Girl

Judgment At Nuremburg

 

 

Judy, Judy, Judy - There's never been anyone like you.

I love every one of those films you listed with Judy Garland. She's wonderful in every one of them.

You didn't mention "Everybody sing" 1937 though. She was great, even though still young pre Wizard of Oz Judy, in that film when she sings "down on melody farm" at the cafe that Allen Jones (as the singer/house cook gets her a job at). That film was wacky also with Fanny Brice as the house servant. Fanny and Judy's Baby Snooks routine was very funny. The whole wacky family made it quite a screwball comedy, even though Judy's mother Billy Burke wasa little too whiny and Judy's father Reginald Owen yelled a lot, but Judy's sister played a nice sweet role. And by me saying Judy's family here, I'm technically being accurate because Judy's name in this film was Judy.  I didn't care too much for seeing Judy in blackface though even though I understand why she was for plot purposes, since she had to disguise herself since her parents were trying to send her away to Europe (I kind of found it tearjerking when Judy's father told her he was sending her away and Judy cried "I'm not as bad as all that").   I enjoyed the whole finale show production number also with Judy singing with all the stage girls.  Those girls along the back row in those very long wide dresses singing operettic for the opening of the song were beautiful, singing and appearance.  You ever notice how in those old films, women in very long dresses and singing opperettic go hand in hand.  Another example of that is in Marx brothers "Day at the races" during the musical number "On blue Venison waters" when the girls in very big long dresses sitting by the water sing a line operettic very beautifully (Allen Jones was in that film too). I can think of several other examples too, but girls in big long dresses and singing in beautiful soft opera voices really went together in those old film's.

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On Friday, June 26, 2015 at 10:31 AM, MarshaKatz said:

Judy Garland, who to me is the greatest entertainer of all time, made so many movies that made such an indelible impression on me. She could do it all and here are some of my favorite Judy performances in film:

 

A Star Is Born

The Wizard of Oz

The Clock

For Me And My Gal

I Could Go On Singing

Easter Parade

Presenting Lily Mars

All the films Judy made with Mickey Rooney

Summer Stock

Meet Me In St. Louis

The Harvey Girls

Ziegfeld Girl

Judgment At Nuremburg

 

 

Judy, Judy, Judy - There's never been anyone like you.

Hey MarshaKatz, just curious, have you noticed how women in big long dresses and soft opera singing often goes hand in hand together in 1930s films, like in the examples I mentioned?

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The song "House of Singing Bamboo" as sung by Howard Keel in Pagan Love Song was originally written for Judy's 1946 film The Harvey Girls. Here is a clip of both versions. I find it interesting how the melody is the same, just with different words. 

 

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