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one thousand two hundred fifty-fourth category

Supporting players overshadow the leads

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Mae West made a bigger impression than George Raft in NIGHT AFTER NIGHT (1934).

Robert Preston stole scenes from Alan Ladd in WHISPERING SMITH (1948).

Marjorie Main & Percy Kilbride were so successful in an earlier film, they were given their own franchise as MA AND PA KETLE (1949).

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4 hours ago, TopBilled said:

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one thousand two hundred fifty-fourth category

Supporting players overshadow the leads

. . . Robert Preston stole scenes from Alan Ladd in WHISPERING SMITH (1948). . . .
 

But Alan Ladd did steal the show in This Gun for Hire (1942).

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A television example--

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John Travolta became very popular on Welcome Back Kotter.

Gabe Kaplan was actually the lead.

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Michael J. Fox became more popular than Meredith Baxter and everyone else on the sitcom Family Ties. Baxter had a "favored nations" clause in her contract, which meant she was to be the highest paid. So anytime the producers gave Fox a raise, she got a raise too. Although her character ended up becoming more of a supporting role, Baxter technically remained the star and earned the most. I wouldn't be surprised if she just received one dollar more than Fox, to keep things legal. Probably they were both making the same amount in the final season.

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Boris Karloff got fourth billing in Frankenstein (1931) after Colin Clive, Mae Clarke and John Boles. John Boles?!?

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21 minutes ago, LiamCasey said:

Boris Karloff got fourth billing in Frankenstein (1931) after Colin Clive, Mae Clarke and John Boles. John Boles?!?

Another one who had fourth billing was Doris Day in her first film ROMANCE ON THE HIGH SEAS (1948), after Jack Carson, Don DeFore and Janis Paige. Originally the project was intended for Betty Hutton who bowed out because of pregnancy. So had she been in it, she certainly would've been the lead. But I guess because Doris was just starting out and didn't have clout at the studio yet, she's billed fourth.

Incidentally, when Doris and Janis did PLEASE DON'T EAT THE DAISIES (1960), Doris was the lead, and Janis was third-billed. And Doris had the lead in THE PAJAMA GAME (1957), but Janis had done that role to rave reviews on Broadway.

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George Sanders & Angela Lansbury overshadow Hurd Hatfield in THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY

Gene Hackman overshadows Clint Eastwood in UNFORGIVEN

Christoph Waltz overshadows the entire ensemble cast and star Brad Pitt in INGLORIOUS BASTERDS. Honorable mention to Michael Fassbender who is a standout and also overshadows Brad Pitt.

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Angela Lansbury overshadows Frank Sinatra, Laurence Harvey & Janet Leigh in THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE

Ida Lupino's performance in THEY DRIVE BY NIGHT is a knockout over the leads George Raft, Ann Sheridan (it's hard to upstage Ann Sheridan), and Humphrey Bogart

Claire Trevor overshadows Rosalind Russell in THE VELVET TOUCH

Michael Keaton overshadows star Henry Winkler in NIGHT SHIFT

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I read an interesting blurb where the director of a 50s western starring Jock Mahoney had trouble on the set because of this issue. He said Universal had recently signed David Janssen, and they were keen to get him started in supporting roles. But Mahoney did not want Janssen in the film, because he knew Janssen was the better actor and would upstage him.

Universal execs insisted Janssen stay in the film, so to help ease Mahoney's insecurities, they came up with a plan where Janssen had to use a gun with the hand opposite he'd normally use, so he wouldn't look so fast and good on screen. And the director had to ask Janssen to dial down his performance. I guess Mahoney, who had wound up in lead roles because of his work as a stuntman, felt uncomfortable by the fact he was not trained on the stage the way guys like Janssen had been. Mahoney wanted to be a star, but was very conscious of his shortcomings as an actor...he was always afraid he'd be overshadowed by other cast members.

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1 hour ago, LonesomePolecat said:

Fonzie on HAPPY DAYS

Yes, Henry Winkler took over a show that had been built around Ron Howard.

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THis has also been a criticism of many of Dickens' works, especially DAVID COPPERFIELD -- that the protagonist is an unforgettable marshmallow surrounded by an incredible array of far more interesting side characters. But of course the rich supporting cast is exactly what we LOVE about Dickens' novels and therefore his films.

d1b4474bca8932f3b124cd5970a61134--aunt-m

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Yes, Henry Winkler took over a show that had been built around Ron Howard.

If we're going to TV, then Leonard Nimoy and his pointy ears got much more fan mail than Shatner, who was supposed to be the star of the show. And that did cause problems as they shifted to the movies as far as salary etc...

 

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12 hours ago, TopBilled said:

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one thousand two hundred fifty-fourth category

Supporting players overshadow the leads

Robert Preston stole scenes from Alan Ladd in WHISPERING SMITH (1948).

 

Frankly, Preston also stole scenes in Victor/Victoria (1982)

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THE COCOANUTS -- The Marx brothers stole the show from the leading lovers (who even remembers their names?), and even the lovely Kay Francis couldn't steal it back

42ND STREET story begins and ends with the director as the driving protagonist, but Ruby Keeler and the funny tap dancers are who you remember

This is true of STAR WARS too -- Luke gets overshadowed by the funny robots, the snarky sidekicks, the interesting aliens, and even his own father

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56 minutes ago, GGGGerald said:

If we're going to TV, then Leonard Nimoy and his pointy ears got much more fan mail than Shatner, who was supposed to be the star of the show. And that did cause problems as they shifted to the movies as far as salary etc...

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Another TV example is Three's Company. Suzanne Somers' character became very popular, so she demanded a huge pay raise, wanting to make as much as John Ritter. Both John Ritter and Joyce DeWitt had "favored nations" clauses in their contracts. John was contractually guaranteed to be the highest earner, and Joyce was guaranteed to be paid the same as Suzanne. If they had bumped Suzanne's salary up to be almost equal to/just under John's, then they would have had to bump Joyce's pay up too. That means all three of them would've been getting star salaries, but the show's budget was designed for one star salary and everyone else to be paid lesser amounts as costars. The producers refused to bump Suzanne and Joyce up, which caused Suzanne to call in sick and miss a week's taping. When Suzanne failed to report to work again she was suspended. Then she filed a lawsuit, which went into arbitration. In the meantime, her screen time decreased drastically. She had to film her scenes in isolation from the rest of the cast (she was barred from the main set), and eventually she was cut from the show at the end of that season when her contract expired. 

So in that case, Suzanne Somers had started to rival John Ritter's popularity on Three's Company, and believed she was worth equal value. But it threw the whole thing off-course and led to her firing. I'm sure Joyce did get a significant pay raise the following season, because Suzanne's permanent replacement (Priscilla Barnes) came in at a lower salary. Ultimately the producers maintained their belief that John was the star of their show, not Suzanne or Joyce. Suzanne Somers recently referred to her old bosses as sexist pigs.

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one thousand two hundred fifty-fifth category

Film is also travelogue

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THE GRAPES OF WRATH (1940)
IL SORPASO (1962)
TWO FOR THE ROAD (1967)
THELMA AND LOUISE (1991)

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Harry and Tonto
My Life in Ruins
National Lampoon's Vacation
Saboteur
How Sweet It Is!
Lost in America
Mr Skitch

The Endless Summer Image result for the endless summer 1966

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THREE (1969), a very good story about a college-aged trio who spend a summer traveling across Europe. It stars a young Sam Waterston, Charlotte Rampling and Robie Porter.

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