Dr. Rich Edwards

July 31 Film Discussion for #NoirSummer for all 13 Films

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This is the end of the line for #NoirSummer. Our last 13 films. Hope you enjoyed these films as much as I have! 

 

You can read my Summer of Darkness Viewing Guide on Canvas here: https://learn.canvas.net/courses/748/pages/summer-of-darkness-viewing-guide-for-july-31-2015

 

And here's the full lineup on TCM on Friday, July 31. In particular, try not to miss Prime Time starting at 8, with your host, Eddie Muller. Click on the links to read articles at TCMDb on that particular film. 

 

6:00 AM THE BIG HEAT (1953)

7:45 AM SUDDENLY (1954)

9:30 AM I DIED A THOUSAND TIMES (1955)

11:30 AM BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT (1956)

1:00 PM THE HARDER THEY FALL (1956)

3:00 PM WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS (1956)

4:45 PM BLUE GARDENIA (1953)

6:15 PM PARTY GIRL (1958)

8:00 PM CRISS CROSS (1949)

9:45 PM BRUTE FORCE (1947)

11:30 PM DESPERATE (1947)

1:00 AM THE ASPHALT JUNGLE (1950)

3:00 AM THE WRONG MAN (1956)

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That's a great collection of heist films for Friday evening. But there's one I really like that doesn't seem to get much play or much comment. It was released in 1956 and is called Time Table. You would think that by 1956 nobody could breathe new life into a train robbery tale. But in this film there are two major surprising twists, one near the beginning and then one smack in the middle. When I first saw this film I was relatively new to film noir and I didn't see either of the twists coming. Yet even though I know the whole caper now, I still enjoy seeing it again.

 

Has anyone else seen Time Table and, if so, what are your comments on it? 

 

-- Fred

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Thank you Professor Edwards and Eddie Muller for the You Tube discussion today. I watched the program live, there were only a few glitches. I pushed restart on my laptop, and the conversation came back on. You were very generous with the time allotted, reading twenty questions from your students. I have enjoyed the course very much, and my capacity to learn new facts about film noir was awakened.How nice to see the background where you both spoke from were filled with books and movies. My computer room with six bookshelves felt right at home. Since taking this course, I now have a membership to the SF Film Noir City online site. The e line magazine had an interesting article on PETE KELLY`S BLUES 1955. I recorded the movie a few weeks ago. Peggy Lee and Ella Fitzgerald singing more than made up for Jack Webb`s stiffness. I am grateful that Jack enjoyed jazz. The last slate of Friday`s film noirs are first rate. Dana Andrews and Raymond Burr in two noirs each, and the excellant CRISS CROSS 1949 couldn`t be better. Thanks again for all the time and effort you both put into the course and the Friday night introductions.

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That's a great collection of heist films for Friday evening. But there's one I really like that doesn't seem to get much play or much comment. It was released in 1956 and is called Time Table. You would think that by 1956 nobody could breathe new life into a train robbery tale. But in this film there are two major surprising twists, one near the beginning and then one smack in the middle. When I first saw this film I was relatively new to film noir and I didn't see either of the twists coming. Yet even though I know the whole caper now, I still enjoy seeing it again.

 

Has anyone else seen Time Table and, if so, what are your comments on it? 

 

-- Fred

 I have never heard or seen this film noir. My Leonard Maltin 2000 movie guide says the director was Mark Stevens. He also stars in the film. Jack Klugman made his movie debut here. Mark Stevens was good in a film noir that TCM broadcast a few weeks ago BETWEEN MIDNIGHT AND DAWN 1950.

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That's a great collection of heist films for Friday evening. But there's one I really like that doesn't seem to get much play or much comment. It was released in 1956 and is called Time Table. You would think that by 1956 nobody could breathe new life into a train robbery tale. But in this film there are two major surprising twists, one near the beginning and then one smack in the middle. When I first saw this film I was relatively new to film noir and I didn't see either of the twists coming. Yet even though I know the whole caper now, I still enjoy seeing it again.

 

Has anyone else seen Time Table and, if so, what are your comments on it? 

 

-- Fred

I have not seen Time Table but I have already added it to my list of movies to see. Mark Stevens, the director, was great in The Dark Corner, a favorite of mine, so I am anxious to see him in Time Table. Thanks for the recommendation.

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 I have never heard or seen this film noir. My Leonard Maltin 2000 movie guide says the director was Mark Stevens. He also stars in the film. Jack Klugman made his movie debut here. Mark Stevens was good in a film noir that TCM broadcast a few weeks ago BETWEEN MIDNIGHT AND DAWN 1950.

I have added Between Midnight and Dawn to my list of movies to see this summer. Mark Stevens is in The Dark Corner, which I have raved about already on this and other discussion threads! Thanks for the recommendation. My movies-to-see list will be keeping me in the Summer of Darkness!!!

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Last day of Summer Of Darkness, working from home so I can have it on in the background. Looking forward to the heist films tonight especially Brute Force! Never seen Party girl so hepefully I can catch that one as well.

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I really love Fritz Lang, so I'm most looking forward to "The Blue Gardenia", "While the City Sleeps", and "Beyond a Reasonable Doubt", because they're his "newspaper Noir" trilogy. I already own and have seen "The Big Heat", which is also a really great movie but I'm really excited to add three more of his films to my collection. A great way to take the sting out of Summer of Darkness's ending.

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Hi everyone.  Tonight the film I am most looking forward to seeing is Criss Cross.  I have only seen it once before and it really is worth another look.  Lang's newsroom trilogy I recorded some time ago and I plan to keep those films on my DVR for a while longer.  Oh, and one of the characters in "While the City Sleeps" was played by Drew Barrymore's father.

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I really love Fritz Lang, so I'm most looking forward to "The Blue Gardenia", "While the City Sleeps", and "Beyond a Reasonable Doubt", because they're his "newspaper Noir" trilogy. I already own and have seen "The Big Heat", which is also a really great movie but I'm really excited to add three more of his films to my collection. A great way to take the sting out of Summer of Darkness's ending.

I just saw Clash by Night, which I DVR'd on TCM last week. It was also directed by Fritz Lang.  The opening is a really unique noir opening set in Monterrey, California.

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While the City Sleeps is a particular favorite of mine. It's an ensemble piece where every character, by way of the story line, gets a good amount of screen time and they are all worth watching. Ida Lupino was especially fun, playing a reporter who would do just about anything to get what she wants. John Barrymore, Jr., is also featured in this. Whether or not it is a true noir, or a crime drama, or just a good story probably bears witness to the fading out of the film noir movie. But, don't forget, while the sun was setting on film noir, Anthony Mann was making westerns with James Stewart and re-defining westerns into noir westerns. So, did the sun really set on noir or did it just morph into something else? I like to think it never really died, it just became a ghost haunting newer movies.

 

Gosh, it's hard to say good-bye...

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I just finished watching Beyond a Reasonable Doubt.  Excellent film!!  What a wonderfully wicked story twist at the end!!  I didn't see that one coming!!  Dana Andrews was so creepy as he calmly explained  his murdering the girl so  he and Joan Fontaine could live happily ever after!!  He actually thought Joan Fontaine would be just fine with the whole thing.  

 

The film  presents issues that are still very much alive today:  people using the system to further their own careers and/or political aspirations, the debate that still rages regarding the death penalty, etc.  It also reflects the nightmare people have to contend with as they are faced with the fact that a loved one really is guilty of a horrible crime....

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Trying to grade my students' essays and watch a full day of Film Noir. I'm looking forward to this evening's lineup; from Criss Cross through The Wrong Man

 

I'm currently watching The Harder They Fall. I just can't get past the brutality of the "sport" of boxing. I've never had any interest in it, and it was really hard to watch in this film. Still, though, it seems the problems associated with boxing  (corruption, fixed fights, etc) has a very long history. It's no wonder there is a good number of films noir and crime films that often use boxing as a plot device.

 

I really liked the set design of the boxing rings. One of them had an Art Deco set design and the other in an open air stadium with the city skyline in the background.

 

I've always loved Humphrey Bogart; he is my favorite Classic Hollywood actor. Knowing this was his last film before death kind of makes it sad for me, but I love that his character was very much on the level and a strong moral compass.

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Ugh, I already miss this class! I'm watching The Harder They Fall and wishing somebody would ask me a question about it. :) But without prompts, what I have to say is that it's too bad Rod Steiger didn't come along sooner, because he doubtless would have been a noir staple had that been the case. Few actors play (or have played) a snarling, **** bad guy better than him.

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I have seen "The Harder They Fall" and always enjoyed it but it's interesting seeing it with what I learned from this class and the short clips TCM was showing on corruption in boxing. This is a good example are the 1950's noir theme of examining corruption in politics, society, and in business. Here the gangsters that were involved with "standard" gangster activities such as robbery were replaced by ones that hid in the shadows of businesses - in this case boxing. It also touches on everyday people being drawn into doing corrupt things to " keep up with the Joneses". The shadowy effects used in the boxing ring, locker rooms, travel bus etc mirrors shady dealings that were happening throughout the movie while the realism approach added to it relevance. I love the great pivotal lines delivered by George ( Jersey Joe Walcott) "Some guys can sell that other guys just can't."

 

It's Humphrey Bogart's last movie so it's always a little hard to watch. But it is a great movie. Ron Steiger always does such a wonderful job.It seems to me when he's trying to explain why he's doing corrupt things he has this underlying tone of saying "Why are you so upset that I'm taking advantage of you?!" Which makes his character even more despicable. It's also interesting to compare Stigers and Bogarts style of acting since they came from two different schools.

 

I enjoy "Beyond a Reasonable Doubt" and loved the ending.

 

I am really going to miss the Friday noir and discussing these films with everyone on the board. It's always so helpful to read others insights.

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I'm one of the many who have enjoyed this series, May I suggest that TCM schedule at least one film noir every Friday

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That's a great collection of heist films for Friday evening. But there's one I really like that doesn't seem to get much play or much comment. It was released in 1956 and is called Time Table. You would think that by 1956 nobody could breathe new life into a train robbery tale. But in this film there are two major surprising twists, one near the beginning and then one smack in the middle. When I first saw this film I was relatively new to film noir and I didn't see either of the twists coming. Yet even though I know the whole caper now, I still enjoy seeing it again.

 

Has anyone else seen Time Table and, if so, what are your comments on it? 

 

-- Fred

I saw Time Table a few days ago and I agree - there are some nice twists in the plot. Love that first one!

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That's a great collection of heist films for Friday evening. But there's one I really like that doesn't seem to get much play or much comment. It was released in 1956 and is called Time Table. You would think that by 1956 nobody could breathe new life into a train robbery tale. But in this film there are two major surprising twists, one near the beginning and then one smack in the middle. When I first saw this film I was relatively new to film noir and I didn't see either of the twists coming. Yet even though I know the whole caper now, I still enjoy seeing it again.

 

Has anyone else seen Time Table and, if so, what are your comments on it? 

 

-- Fred

I saw it once and thought it was good but it was an awful while ago. 

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Party Girl- A Ted Turner Colorized Classic, I've had a change of heart, colorized films can be noir especially if that good looking Robert Taylor is in it, in his technicolor glory

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I'm asking myself "If they wanted to show a color noir movie, why not Bad Day at Black Rock???" Not that Party Girl is all that bad, just that Bad Day at Black Rock is all that great, and twice as noir, if you ask me...

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I will miss Summer of /Darkness so much! Have now become addicted to black and white films, love their elegance, their intensity, how you can say so much so sparingly. And love noir more than ever.

 

Thanks to TCM, Ball State, Canvas, Richard, Eddie Muller et all. My only complaint is the course was much too short. Should have been a semester of darkness, in my opinion.

 

Why is there no "noir" channel in cable line ups? Or even an all crime/police/mystery channel, since there are all western channels, and all "chick flic" channels? If 20k people took this class, there would surely be an audience  for it. And no way to run out of material, if you include old tv shows as well as films. Just an idea.

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I just watched While the City Sleeps.  It was poignant watching Dana Andrews' character drink so heavily,  actually getting drunk a couple of times to the point where his behavior left a lot to be desired.  In "real life," Andrews developed a major drinking problem.   He was eventually able to become a recovering alcoholic and worked with the Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence.

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Bad Day at Black Rock is a better color noir,...they could have showed both on Saturday, Summer of Darkness held over..

sigh... i wish

I'm asking myself "If they wanted to show a color noir movie, why not Bad Day at Black Rock???" Not that Party Girl is all that bad, just that Bad Day at Black Rock is all that great, and twice as noir, if you ask me...

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This is my first time seeing Criss Cross. Hard to believe that this beautiful woman is Lily Munster!  Great story and acting so far especially be DeCarlo.

 

And the fashion! I can stop looking at the shoes!

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