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Swithin

Performances of great songs from musical theater

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This thread will feature video performances of songs from musical theater. The songs will be largely from lesser known shows. The performances will not necessarily be sung by the artists who introduced the songs, but as they can be found on YouTube.

I'm starting the thread with two songs from one of my favorite scores -- Tenderloin (1959) by Bock and Harnick. The show is about a preacher (played by Maurice Evans) who comes to New York City to reform the red-light district, i.e. the Tenderloin. "Little Old New York" is the prostitutes' message to the preacher -- stay away! "Artificial Flowers" became a standard, in a much jazzier version than was used in the show.



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Grand Tour, with songs by Jerry Herman, was a musical version of the play Jacobowsky and the Colonel. Joel Grey was the star. Here's Michael Feinstein singing "Marianne," the show's best song.

 

 

 

 

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"Here's That Rainy Day" from "Carnival in Flanders"

 

"All the Things You Are" from "Very Warm for May"

Fi -- this thread is not just about naming them. It's about posting good performances of the songs.

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Swithin, you presume that some unknown song from some obscure musical that strikes YOUR fancy is automatically worth posting.  And besides, some of us aren't ABLE to post YouTube clips and clutter up every thread with them.  So some allowances might be courteous.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Swithin, you presume that some unknown song from some obscure musical that strikes YOUR fancy is automatically worth posting. And besides, some of us aren't ABLE to post YouTube clips and clutter up every thread with them. So some allowances might be courteous.

 

 

Sepiatone

Well Sepia I did begin the thread about a subject that's of interest to me. That's what we do here. I've clarified the subject line to make it clearer. If someone is interested in making a separate thread of lists of songs, of course they're welcome to do that.

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The movie Irma La Douce (1963) did not use the songs from the French musical, which opened on Broadway in 1960. The tunes were used as background music in the film. For her performance as Irma, Elizabeth Seal won the Best Actress Tony for 1961 (beating out Julie Andrews for Camelot and others). Here's a performance (in French) of "Dis Donc," the song heard over the credits of the movie. The singer is Colette Renard, who played Irma in the original French stage production.

 

 

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The 1951 Sammy Fain/E.Y. Harburg musical Flahooley included this beautiful song, sung by Barbara Cook in her Broadaway debut. (Nehemiah Persoff, who recently turned 98, was also in the cast).

 

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Fi -- this thread is not just about naming them. It's about posting good performances of the songs.

Was the title of this thread changed to include videos?

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Was the title of this thread changed to include videos?

Yes -- you inspired that change, you mover and shaker you! I intended for it to be a performance thread, not a list thread.

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Here are some clips featuring Betty Buckley and Linzi Hatley performing "And Eve Was Weak" from CARRIE: THE MUSICAL, which has gone down as one of the biggest flops in Broadway history.

 

But this song and this performance of it are wonderful.

 

And many years later the musical would be revised (with some songs deleted from the score and some added as well some revisions to the book) and would find success off-Broadway and in regional theaters.

Last year I saw a great production performed by a  theater company where the teenage characters were played by real teenagers. I was glad that none of the play's "salty" language was diluted for that peformance.

 

Betty Buckley, who played Carrie's mother in the Broadway production of the musical, played Carrie's gym teacher in the 1976 movie adaptation of Stephen King's novel.

Produced by the Royal Shakespeare Company, CARRIE: THE MUSICAL had its initial run at Stratford-upon-Avon in England with Barbara Cook in the role of Carrie's mother. Cook resigned after being nearly decapitated by a set piece on opening night, but she stayed with the production for the remainder of the Stratford run until a replacement could be found.

When the showed was transferred to Broadway, Linzi Hatley reprised her role as Carrie with Betty Buckley taking over the role of Carrie's mother.

 

 

 

 

 

    
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One of the great songs from Sondheim's early musical A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum is "Impossible," in which father and son Senex (David Burns) and Hero (Brian Davies) both lust after  Phil ia. This song was unfortunately not in the movie.

 

 

 

(Note that P h i l i a is curiously censored here!)

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The International Ladies Garment Workers Union (ILGWU) put on a musical revue in 1937, with songs by Harold Rome. It was called Pins and Needles.  In 1962, a commercial recording was made of the songs, to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the show. A newcomer named Barbra Streisand sang the wonderful ditty, "Nobody Makes a Pass at Me."

 

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If we're talking about lesser known musicals Another Evening With Harry Stoones certainly qualifies.

It lasted 9 previews and 1 performance. ("This is true. So I feel it's an important show.   . . .") 

 

Here's a clip of Barbra Streisand (who was in the show) singing the song "Value" from it.

This recording was made "Live at the Bon Soir" with the club's audience present. The Bon Soir recording was orginally supposed to be Streisand's first album, but the record label later decided to go with a traditional studio recorded album.

Streisand also sang "Value" during her A HAPPENING IN CENTRAL PARK television special.

 

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If we're talking about lesser known musicals Another Evening With Harry Stoones certainly qualifies.

It lasted 9 previews and 1 performance. ("This is true. So I feel it's an important show.   . . .") 

 

Very nice -- thanks! Never heard of it! Just looked it up. Couldn't find it on IBDB but found it on the Lortel Archives site, meaning it was Off-Broadway. 1961-- Barbra Streisand, Dom DeLuise, Diana Sands, all in their 20s. Gramercy Arts Theatre.

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Hazel Flagg was a Broadway musical by Ben Hecht/Jule Styne/Bob Hilliard based on the story which also inspired the movie Nothing Sacred.  The musical was the source for the Martin & Lewis movie, Living It Up.

 

Here's Michael Feinstein singing the hit song; then, from the original cast album, Jack Whitiing, who played the Mayor of New York.

 

 

 

 

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New Girl in Town (1957) is a musical (songs by Bob Merrill) based on Eugene O'Neill's Anna Christie. It starred Gwen Verdon (Anna), who won her third of four Tony Awards for her performance (it was a tie with her co-star, Thelma Ritter, who played Marthy, the role Marie Dressler played in the 1930 film of Anna Christie).

 

Here are two songs from the show: 

 

"The Sunshine Girl Has Raindrops in Her Eyes," sung by Eddie Fisher;

 

and "Flings," sung by Carol Burnett and Martha Raye on "The Carol Burnett Show." Thelma Ritter's version from the original cast album follows.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Take Me Along is a 1959 musical version of Ah, Wilderness! From the original cast album, here are Jackie Gleason and Walter Pidgeon singing the title song.

 

 

 

The cast also included Eileen Herlie, Una Merkel, and Robert Morse. Songs by Bob Merrill.

 

Here are Jackie Gleason and Eileen Herlie singing "I Get Embarrassed:"

 

 

 

(Walter Pidgeon played Nat, who was played in the 1935 film by Lionel Barrymore; Jackie Gleason played Sid, played in the film by Wallace Beery; Eileen Herlie played Lily, played in the film by Aline MacMahon.)

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A Tree Grows in Brooklyn is a 1951 musical with songs by Arthur Schwartz and Dorothy Fields. When Shirley Booth was cast in the role of Aunt Cissy, the role was expanded (it had been played in the movie by Joan Blondell).

 

Here's is Shirley Booth singing "He Had Refinement."

 

 

 

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A Tree Grows in Brooklyn is a 1951 musical with songs by Arthur Schwartz and Dorothy Fields. When Shirley Booth was cast in the role of Aunt Cissy, the role was expanded (it had been played in the movie by Joan Blondell).

 

Here's is Shirley Booth singing "He Had Refinement."

 

 

I'd never heard this song before.

I like the lyric "come out of the bathroom drippin' like a dyin' swan."

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Two songs from early Lionel Bart shows, years before he wrote Oliver!:

 

Miriam Karlin (the cat lady from Clockwork Orange) and Glynn Edwards sing the title song from Fings Ain't Wot They Used T'Be, a song in which Cockney low-lifes long for the good old days. The song became a hit and was later cleaned up for popular consumption.

 

 

 

The great Hy Hazell sings "I'll Be There" from Lock Up Your Daughters.

 

 

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"Blondes for Danger" sung by Joan Heal, from the original cast of the British musical Divorce Me, Darling. Book, music and lyrics by Sandy Wilson.

 

 

 

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The Broadway show Rags (1986) by Charles Strouse/Stephen Schwartz/Joseph Stein was not a success. But it was a noble attempt to depict the early 20th century immigrant experience in NYC and had a great score. Here's the title song as sung on the Tony Awards:

 

 

 

And "Greenhorns" from the original cast album:

 

 

 

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Two on the Aisle was a 1951 Styne/Comden/Green Broadway show with Bert Lahr and Dolores Gray. Gray has this terrific number, "If You Hadn't But You Did."

 

 

 

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"Goodbye (The Prince's Farewell)," one of the lesser-known songs from the great musical Little Me, based on the book by Patrick Dennis (author of Auntie Mame). Sung by Sid Caesar from the original cast album.

 

 

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