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Barton_Keyes

December 2015 Spotlight: Girlfriends

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December 7

GIRLFRIENDS COMING OF AGE:

THE WORLD OF HENRY ORIENT (1964)...Tippi Walker and Merrie Spaeth

WHERE ANGELS GO, TROUBLE FOLLOWS (1968)...Rosalind Russell and Stella Stevens

 

BEST FRIENDS

RICH AND FAMOUs (1981)...Candice Bergen and Jaqueline Bisset

THREE ON A MATCH (1932)...Joan Blondell and Ann Dvorak

 

December 14

FRENEMIES:

OLD ACQUAINTANCE (1943)...Bette Davis and Miriam Hopkins

THE WOMEN (1939)...Norma Shearer and Rosalind Russell

 

WARTIME WOMEN'S FRIENDSHIPS:

SWING SHIFT (1984)...Goldie Hawn and Christine Lahti

TENDER COMRADE (1943)...Ginger Rogers and Ruth Hussey

 

December 21

WHERE THE BOYS ARE:

GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES (1953)...Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell

WHERE THE BOYS ARE (1960)...Dolores Hart and Yvette Mimieux

 

ROOMMATES:

GIRLFRIENDS (1978)...Melanie Mayron and Anita Skinner

SHEILA LEVINE IS DEAD AND LIVING IN NEW YORK (1975)...Jeannie Berlin and Rebecca Dianna Smith

 

December 28

MORE THAN FRIENDS?​:

THE CHILDREN'S HOUR (1961)...Audrey Hepburn and Shirley MacLaine

THESE THREE (1936)...Miriam Hopkins and Merle Oberon

 

A CIRCLE OF FRIENDS:

LITTLE DARLINGS (1980)...Tatum O'Neal and Kristy McNichol

STAGE DOOR (1937)...Katharine Hepburn and Ginger Rogers

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They just had the women trailblazers in October, now a month in December on movies about women..? It's heavy-handed. This was a great idea, but it should have been saved for later on...with a bit more of a break between the trailblazers series and this one.

 

Plus I don't think it fits well with other things going on at the end of the year.

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They just had the women trailblazers in October, now a month in December on movies about women..? It's heavy-handed. This was a great idea, but it should have been saved for later on...with a bit more of a break between the trailblazers series and this one.

 

Plus I don't think it fits well with other things going on at the end of the year.

 

I actually like that they're doing these two series close together, so audiences can appreciate the contribution of women behind the camera in October and two months later examine the way women have been depicted on film. It's worth noting that only one film in the December Spotlight, GIRLFRIENDS (1978), was actually directed by a woman (Claudia Weill).

 

As for the timing of it with regards to end-of-year programming on TCM, I suspect many people feel the same way about the women filmmakers series occupying time usually reserved for horror films leading up to Halloween. Both opinions are perfectly valid, of course, but clearly the programmers don't necessarily take such festivities as Halloween, Christmas etc. into account when programming the Spotlight series.

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I actually like that they're doing these two series close together, so audiences can appreciate the contribution of women behind the camera in October and two months later examine the way women have been depicted on film. It's worth noting that only one film in the December Spotlight, GIRLFRIENDS (1978), was actually directed by a woman (Claudia Weill).

 

As for the timing of it with regards to end-of-year programming on TCM, I suspect many people feel the same way about the women filmmakers series occupying time usually reserved for horror films leading up to Halloween. Both opinions are perfectly valid, of course, but clearly the programmers don't necessarily take such festivities as Halloween, Christmas etc. into account when programming the Spotlight series.

 

I'm glad that the programmers don't place such importance to festivities as Halloween and Christmas etc...    I don't wish for any month to be dominated by certain type of films.   Some classic horror a few days in October and the same old Christmas films a few days in December is more than enough for me.    Funny but there is a thread complaining about the Labor Day programming;  I really don't get the 'need' for that type of theme based programming.  

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I actually like that they're doing these two series close together, so audiences can appreciate the contribution of women behind the camera in October and two months later examine the way women have been depicted on film. It's worth noting that only one film in the December Spotlight, GIRLFRIENDS (1978), was actually directed by a woman (Claudia Weill).

 

I think you missed the point of what I was saying. I never said the December spotlight had more films directed by women. But the content is female-centered. And I just think they are over-doing it. Again, it's a great idea for a spotlight, but it should have been spaced apart more at a distance from the earlier spotlight. Let people forget about women's films for awhile, then come back and reintroduce/reinforce the need for this kind of programming. There is definitely a need for it. But too much, in heavy doses, seems didactic and may (the operative word is 'may' because I am being flexible with this criticism) alienate male viewers. So yes, I will continue to give this spotlight a thumbs down, not for its message or its swell intentions, but for its timing which does not seem entirely correct.

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I think you missed the point of what I was saying. I never said the December spotlight had more films directed by women. But the content is female-centered. And I just think they are over-doing it. Again, it's a great idea for a spotlight, but it should have been spaced apart more at a distance from the earlier spotlight. Let people forget about women's films for awhile, then come back and reintroduce/reinforce the need for this kind of programming. There is definitely a need for it. But too much, in heavy doses, seems didactic and may (the operative word is 'may' because I am being flexible with this criticism) alienate male viewers. So yes, I will continue to give this spotlight a thumbs down, not for its message or its swell intentions, but for its timing which does not seem entirely correct.

 

I can certainly appreciate your view on the timing of this series, but I must object to your employing of the phrase "women's films" in reference to the October series. While the focus of that series is on women behind the camera, no one could reasonably argue that A DRY WHITE SEASON (1989), HARLAN COUNTY U.S.A. (1976) or THE HURT LOCKER (2008) are in any way 'women's pictures'; all three are among the films being screened next month. The distinction for me is that the content of the December series seems more obviously geared toward a female viewing audience.

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I can certainly appreciate your view on the timing of this series, but I must object to your employing of the phrase "women's films" in reference to the October. While the focus of that series is on women behind the camera, no one could reasonably argue that A DRY WHITE SEASON (1989), HARLAN COUNTY U.S.A. (1976) or THE HURT LOCKER (2008) are in any way 'women's pictures'; all three are among the films being screened next month. The distinction for me is that the content of the December series seems more obviously geared toward a female viewing audience.

Well, yes, it is obviously is.

 

Most of the films in October, though, are stories about women by women. 

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This month's Spotlight will be hosted by Tiffany Vazquez. Previously the winner of TCM's Ultimate Fan Contest, in April of 2014 Ms. Vazquez introduced THE NAKED CITY (1948) alongside Robert Osborne during the opening night of the channel's twentieth anniversary 'Fan Programmers' festival.

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This month's Spotlight will be hosted by Tiffany Vazquez. Previously the winner of TCM's Ultimate Fan Contest, in April of 2014 Ms. Vazquez introduced THE NAKED CITY (1948) alongside Robert Osborne during the opening night of the channel's twentieth anniversary 'Fan Programmers' festival.

It's great to see TCM bringing back a fan to introduce an entire series. She must have really impressed RO when she introduced "The Naked City."

 

I'm looking forward to quite a few films in the series--especially "These Three." I've seen the remake, "The Children's Hour" with Audrey Hepburn and Shirley MacLaine. I've also heard the Lux Radio Theatre version with Errol Flynn, Barbara Stanwyck and Mary Astor. I'd be interested to see how the original is.

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It's great to see TCM bringing back a fan to introduce an entire series. She must have really impressed RO when she introduced "The Naked City."

 

I'm looking forward to quite a few films in the series--especially "These Three." I've seen the remake, "The Children's Hour" with Audrey Hepburn and Shirley MacLaine. I've also heard the Lux Radio Theatre version with Errol Flynn, Barbara Stanwyck and Mary Astor. I'd be interested to see how the original is.

The original is somewhat hampered because of the production code (the remake is more faithful to Hellman's play, though it also doesn't quite go all the way). Personally, I think Miriam Hopkins is the best actress in both versions (she plays a lead role in the original and a supporting role in the remake).

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The original is somewhat hampered because of the production code (the remake is more faithful to Hellman's play, though it also doesn't quite go all the way). Personally, I think Miriam Hopkins is the best actress in both versions (she plays a lead role in the original and a supporting role in the remake).

I saw The Children's Hour on TV in the early 60's when I was 11 or 12.  I remember that I did not quite understand the implications at the time and figured that I had missed something.. However, I remembered that the acting was very well done and really liked the film when viewing again a few years ago.   IT was done with finesse and panache. 

 

Later (about seven or eight years ago)  in viewing the great These Three I understood better, but the Production Code had precluded the real premise of the film.   I still remember the poignant and lovely music in the background of the latter and how the film was enhanced by the great acting of Miriam Hopkins, Joel McCrea and Merle Oberon.  At the time I thought of it as a totally different story, but  later discovered it was done with tact because of the Code.   I like this film too.  Like you were saying, Miriam Hopkins really shines in both films.  She has become another favorite of mine.  Her marvelous performance as Ivy Peterson in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde was very realistic and frightening.  Miriam was great in everything!

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This month's Spotlight will be hosted by Tiffany Vazquez. Previously the winner of TCM's Ultimate Fan Contest, in April of 2014

 

Whaaaa? An ultimate fan without a zillion post counts on the message board? I'd like to know just HOW they determined "ultimate fan"....

 

Miriam was great in everything!

 

I first realized her acting talent watching with the sound off- you can perfectly tell EXACTLY what she's thinking by her body language.

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This month's Spotlight will be hosted by Tiffany Vazquez. Previously the winner of TCM's Ultimate Fan Contest, in April of 2014

 

Whaaaa? An ultimate fan without a zillion post counts on the message board? I'd like to know just HOW they determined "ultimate fan"....

 

Miriam was great in everything!

 

I first realized her acting talent watching with the sound off- you can perfectly tell EXACTLY what she's thinking by her body language.

Though after seeing a few of "the ultimate fan's" introductions, I can't say I'm too impressed with her hosting skills.  It is very apparent that she's reading.  Osborne and Mankiewicz are probably reading too, but they have a more conversational tone.  "Ultimate Fan" reminds me of the nervous kid who is forced to give a speech in front of the class.  I figured someone who was such a fan and had apparently been on TCM before would sound more enthusiastic about the films she's presenting.  The couple of times that I saw her, she sounded very lackluster.  However, I'm chalking it up to the fact that she's not a professional host, so I'll let it pass.   

 

I've seen Miriam Hopkins in Old Acquaintance and Virginia City.  I didn't like her in the latter film, I found her better in the former.  However, I'm still on the fence about her.  I'll need to watch more to get a clear opinion.  I don't know what it is right now, but there's something about her that annoys me.  I'll keep an open mind though until I feel I've seen enough to have a definitive opinion.  Perhaps I'll see the "ultimate" Miriam Hopkins film that will move me into her fan camp. 

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Though after seeing a few of "the ultimate fan's" introductions, I can't say I'm too impressed with her hosting skills.  It is very apparent that she's reading.  Osborne and Mankiewicz are probably reading too, but they have a more conversational tone.  "Ultimate Fan" reminds me of the nervous kid who is forced to give a speech in front of the class.  I figured someone who was such a fan and had apparently been on TCM before would sound more enthusiastic about the films she's presenting.  The couple of times that I saw her, she sounded very lackluster.  However, I'm chalking it up to the fact that she's not a professional host, so I'll let it pass.   

 

I've seen Miriam Hopkins in Old Acquaintance and Virginia City.  I didn't like her in the latter film, I found her better in the former.  However, I'm still on the fence about her.  I'll need to watch more to get a clear opinion.  I don't know what it is right now, but there's something about her that annoys me.  I'll keep an open mind though until I feel I've seen enough to have a definitive opinion.  Perhaps I'll see the "ultimate" Miriam Hopkins film that will move me into her fan camp. 

 

If there isn't something about Miriam that annoys you,  you're not human.  (ha ha).   But seriously she does have an edge to her and in most cases this is very effective and enhances the character she is playing.    

 

While Hopkins did very good work spanning 4 decades my favorite films of hers are from the 30s;

 

The Smiling Lieutenant,   Dr. Jekll and Mr. Hyde,  Trouble in Paradise, The Story of Temple Drake, Design for Living, and Becky Sharp are some of my favorites.

 

Later on she played secondary parts but still made an impact with one of her best performances being in The Heiress.   Her character in this film is very annoying and Hopkins was perfect in the role. 

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