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LOVE AFFAIR (1939)

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This film was remade twice, but nothing surpasses the original. I am watching it this afternoon. Such a beautiful film, brings tears to my eyes. 

 

I love the sequence where they visit Maria Ouspenskaya's character and pray at the church together. Exquisite, simple, lovely. What a classic romance!

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I don't understand why TCM seldom plays this film. It's such a crowd-pleasing classic. 

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I don't understand why TCM seldom plays this film. It's such a crowd-pleasing classic. 

It may be due to the fact that "An Affair To Remember" with Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr has became such a famous film throughout the years.

 

Sometimes, the remake eclipses the original.

 

For example, the first and second remakes of "Waterloo Bridge".

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It may be due to the fact that "An Affair To Remember" with Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr has became such a famous film throughout the years.

 

Sometimes, the remake eclipses the original.

 

For example, the first and second remakes of "Waterloo Bridge".

Yes, that's a strong possibility. But I don't think the Grant-Kerr pairing comes anywhere close to capturing the magic that Dunne & Boyer have in the original. 

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Screen%2Bshot%2B2016-08-10%2Bat%2B5.41.1

 

Boyer and Dunne made two more films after LOVE AFFAIR. There was WHEN TOMORROW COMES, a romance drama for Universal which hit screens later in 1939 (TCM has never aired it). And then in 1944, they reunited for Columbia's romantic comedy TOGETHER AGAIN.

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For anyone who missed LOVE AFFAIR yesterday, TCM will be rebroadcasting it on November 9th.

 

It also still available to stream on Amazon Prime.

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This film was remade twice, but nothing surpasses the original. I am watching it this afternoon. Such a beautiful film, brings tears to my eyes. 

 

I love the sequence where they visit Maria Ouspenskaya's character and pray at the church together. Exquisite, simple, lovely. What a classic romance!

Yes. The leads are superb and it's a wonderful opportunity to see a sophisitcated Maria Ouspenskaya, who too often was cast as grisled ethnic character types. She glows in this movie.

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Yes. The leads are superb and it's a wonderful opportunity to see a sophisitcated Maria Ouspenskaya, who too often was cast as grisled ethnic character types. She glows in this movie.

 

Great comment Dougie. I think one of the reasons I love the Republic western WYOMING (1947) so much is because Ouspenskaya plays an ethnic character but she has a tender quality, suggesting a life of sophistication back in Europe before coming to the American west. Then there's Republic's musical I'VE ALWAYS LOVED YOU (1946), directed by Frank Borzage, where she plays a patroness of the arts, which is kind of a glamorous role for her. She's interesting to watch on screen.

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I haven't seen either WYOMING or I'VE ALWAYS LOVED YOU, but I'll look for both. Type-casting was (and is) cruel because B level and below stars didn't always get to express their full range. A-listers were sometimes indulged with a wider range of roles.

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I haven't seen either WYOMING or I'VE ALWAYS LOVED YOU, but I'll look for both. Type-casting was (and is) cruel because B level and below stars didn't always get to express their full range. A-listers were sometimes indulged with a wider range of roles.

 

WYOMING should be a better known 'A' western. I'VE ALWAYS LOVED YOU was the first of three that Frank Borzage did at Republic in the postwar years. It was also a rare example of Republic making a musical in Technicolor-- they tended to film in black-and-white until December 1946 when the studio began to use its own Trucolor process. Ouspenskaya is perfectly cast in both and does get a chance to show her range as a performer.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-17-at-10-12-40-am.jp

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Yes. The leads are superb and it's a wonderful opportunity to see a sophisitcated Maria Ouspenskaya, who too often was cast as grisled ethnic character types. She glows in this movie.

Maria was memorable in the Wolf Man, playing the fortune teller.  Granted, it goes to your point that she was often stereotyped. 

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Oh thanks for the suggestion. I know what I will watch this weekend :) I like Irene Dunne and her films, one of my favorite is Roberta (1935).

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