mr6666

Healthcare in America?

656 posts in this topic

My healthcare website sent me a "new" message which is actually old in the news. Aetna is acquiring Humana. I suppose this will help spread the cost of doing business. Other insurers are claiming large losses as a result of the ACA - threatening to close up shop.

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Having taken early retirement, I'm in the gap between no coverage - unless I paid for it out of pocket (at great expense) - and Medicare, for which it will be some years before I become eligible. 

 

The Healthcare Marketplace (Obamacare) has allowed me to obtain coverage equal to that which my previous full-time employers have provided - at roughly the same cost to me. I am only allowed this coverage until I reach the eligible age for Medicare, then I drop out of the Healthcare Marketplace and begin Medicare.

 

There are income restrictions for this coverage. Should I re-enter the job market, any increase in yearly income would reduce my subsidized coverage allowance - increasing out of pocket expense. Earning too much would bump me from the program altogether. This is self-adjusting in that way, and I have no problem with that. I do not want to take advantage of the system. I want to pull my own load.

 

In my case, this system works as intended. I reckon I'm fortunate. I just hope my provider(s) can remain in force until I reach the age requirement for Medicare.

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COLORADO AMENDMENT--

 

"Amendment 69 is on the ballot in Colorado to offer single-payer to all residents. Polls are showing that the proposal, despite being fought by big money like the Koch brothers, is gaining a lot of ground. While the messaging is still not where it should be, when the proposal is explained to Coloradans, 55 percent approve. Even when pollsters explained it from the other side, as if they were opponents in a debate, more than half approved of the initiative...

 

Sanders:  “So if you’re asking me, do I think if a major state — whether it’s Colorado or California or whatever — goes forward and it works well, [will] other states say ‘Hey, you know, I got a brother over there in Colorado and he’s getting health care, great health care and it’s less expensive than the current system,’ ” Sanders said. “Yeah, I think that is one possibility.”

 

http://usuncut.news/2016/08/05/bernie-sanders-being-recruited-for-a-position-and-its-huge/

 

See:  https://ballotpedia.org/Colorado_State_Health_Care_System,_Amendment_69_(2016)

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Aetna Shows Why We Need a Single-Payer System-

 

"The best argument for a single-payer health plan is the recent decision by giant health insurer Aetna to bail out next year from 11 of the 15 states where it sells Obamacare plans.

Aetna’s decision follows similar moves by UnitedHealth Group, the nation’s largest insurer, and Humana, one of the other giants.

 

All claim they’re not making enough money because too many people with serious health problems are using the Obamacare exchanges, and not enough healthy people are signing up.

 

The problem isn’t Obamacare per se. It’s in the structure of private markets for health insurance – which creates powerful incentives to avoid sick people and attract healthy ones. Obamacare is just making the structural problem more obvious...."

 

http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/aetna_shows_why_we_need_a_single_payer_20160817

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Aetna CEO Threatened Obamacare Pullout If Feds Opposed Humana Merger-
 
Give us our merger or we’ll quit Obamacare, the insurer told Justice Department officials in a July letter...

 

"...in a letter to the Department of Justice, Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini said the two issues were closely linked. In fact, he made a clear threat: If President Barack Obama’s administration refused to allow the merger to proceed, he wrote, Aetna would be in worse financial position and would have to withdraw from most of its Obamacare markets, and quite likely all of them....

 

To Obamacare critics, Aetna’s retreat is proof the law is failing. To supporters, it shows the company was using its participation in Obama’s signature domestic policy initiative as a bargaining chip in order to secure approval of a controversial business deal...."

 

 

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/aetna-obamacare-pullout-humana-merger_us_57b3d747e4b04ff883996a13

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No matter which way the marketplace goes, local, state or fed government(s) will be taking up the slack at hospitals and care centers. They're doing it now. My hospital received 40 million last year to cover uninsured patients. Either the Fed increases this amount, and increases the number of recipients (hospitals and care centers), or the Fed subsidizes the healthcare industry directly - Obamacare.

 

The Fed wants to give this money away; they just want it to be accounted for more accurately.

 

I think the CEOs are just fighting over whose pockets the money lands in - greed as usual.

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No matter which way the marketplace goes, local, state or fed government(s) will be taking up the slack at hospitals and care centers. They're doing it now. My hospital received 40 million last year to cover uninsured patients. Either the Fed increases this amount, and increases the number of recipients (hospitals and care centers), or the Fed subsidizes the healthcare industry directly - Obamacare.

 

The Fed wants to give this money away; they just want it to be accounted for more accurately.

 

I think the CEOs are just fighting over whose pockets the money lands in - greed as usual.

 

Only America feels the need to waste half its money for healthcare on insurance company profits.

 

If it wasn't so stupid it'd be funny.

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Life-Saving Allergy Treatment Is Becoming Too Expensive For Families To Afford--

 

"Mylan has priced this life-saving medication, which can keep airways open during severe allergic reactions, far out of reach for many families.

Over the past nine years, since Mylan bought the rights to the EpiPen, the price for the easy-to-use injectors has quintupled — increasing about 450 percent, from around $50 for one injector to $600 for a pack of two...."

 

https://thinkprogress.org/life-saving-allergy-treatment-is-becoming-too-expensive-for-families-to-afford-4fe5dd9aab39#.n26ljyr12

 

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Aetna CEO Threatened Obamacare Pullout If Feds Opposed Humana Merger-
 
Give us our merger or we’ll quit Obamacare, the insurer told Justice Department officials in a July letter...

 

"...in a letter to the Department of Justice, Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini said the two issues were closely linked. In fact, he made a clear threat: If President Barack Obama’s administration refused to allow the merger to proceed, he wrote, Aetna would be in worse financial position and would have to withdraw from most of its Obamacare markets, and quite likely all of them....

 

To Obamacare critics, Aetna’s retreat is proof the law is failing. To supporters, it shows the company was using its participation in Obama’s signature domestic policy initiative as a bargaining chip in order to secure approval of a controversial business deal...."

 

 

 

 

 

Aetna has pulled out of S.C. ACA.

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The ACA's customer base are mostly people who have health problems which sucks the money out of the system. They're trying to find a way to get younger, healthier people to enroll so their premiums can be used to defer the costs.

 

Some months back, I read a blurb mentioning many younger people are not buying into health insurance, believing they don't really need it; that they can get by until they reach middle age when they will eventually obtain health insurance.

 

The trouble is.. the average person may have to pay $700-$1200 per month for a health insurance policy which has a $6000-$10000 deductible. So they will need to come up with roughly $22,000 per year for single person coverage. This is, of course, if they cannot acquire insurance through an employer.

 

When more younger, healthier people enroll, these high costs may be reduced for everyone - if the CEOs don't siphon off the extra dollars first. The Fed will need to keep a sharp eye on that.

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Disgusting...this is nothing but greed! People's lives depends on having this.

 

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2016/08/22/two-senators-urge-scrutiny-epipen-price-boost/89129620/\

 

iStock_17412151_LARGE.jpg?itok=nZ5Y0rvw

082316-EpiPen-Prices-v4.jpg

 

Capitalism = supply and demand =Greed=Capitalism

 

The only thing that can stop that equation and make it more Humane is called government regulation, but that's something people who vote for the Republican party will never see.

 

 

The Republican Party became the party of deregulation under Ronald Reagan.

 

You go from air traffic controllers to drug companies, with everything else in between.

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U.S. Healthcare System Culls the Wheat from the Working Class Chaff--

 

"No terrorist group is stronger or more threatening. No political candidate is more menacing – not even Donald Trump.  Standing ever at the ready to pass judgement on the value or lack thereof of your life, my life, and every American life stands the health care industry and its stockholders.

 

Until we recognize the depth of the internal threat from the collusion that drives the medical-financial-industrial-complex (the MFIC), we won’t change this system to one that truly values health and life over profits. The MFIC includes all the obvious suspects – the for-profit health insurance industry, big Pharma, medical device manufacturers, the giant hospitals and providers’ groups, and the collection agencies and financiers who keep the flow flowing.

 I have to add to that group all stockholders in these corporations who cannot reasonably assert any deniability about profiting personally from the pain of others....

 

http://www.commondreams.org/views/2016/09/08/us-healthcare-system-culls-wheat-working-class-chaff

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U.S. Healthcare System Culls the Wheat from the Working Class Chaff--

 

"No terrorist group is stronger or more threatening. No political candidate is more menacing – not even Donald Trump.  Standing ever at the ready to pass judgement on the value or lack thereof of your life, my life, and every American life stands the health care industry and its stockholders.

 

Until we recognize the depth of the internal threat from the collusion that drives the medical-financial-industrial-complex (the MFIC), we won’t change this system to one that truly values health and life over profits. The MFIC includes all the obvious suspects – the for-profit health insurance industry, big Pharma, medical device manufacturers, the giant hospitals and providers’ groups, and the collection agencies and financiers who keep the flow flowing.

 I have to add to that group all stockholders in these corporations who cannot reasonably assert any deniability about profiting personally from the pain of others....

 

http://www.commondreams.org/views/2016/09/08/us-healthcare-system-culls-wheat-working-class-chaff

 

 

That's a heavy article - and so true.

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I hope Florida follows up with similar legislation. I've had out of network billings show up in my mailbox as much as 18 months after I thought everything was paid for by my insurance. These can be for large amounts which can easily drain savings. The best I can do to recover partial amounts is to claim them as deductibles at tax time.

 

My PCP is fully covered by my insurance but when he wants me to have certain scans he farms them out to a medical service 100 miles away - they send a team to this area. They are out of network and ask to be paid on the spot before they proceed. 

 

It's a racket for sure.

 

It's getting so bad for some, they'd be better off telling the facility they have no insurance and let the government grant monies pick up the tab. 

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I hope Florida follows up with similar legislation. I've had out of network billings show up in my mailbox as much as 18 months after I thought everything was paid for by my insurance. These can be for large amounts which can easily drain savings. The best I can do to recover partial amounts is to claim them as deductibles at tax time.

 

My PCP is fully covered by my insurance but when he wants me to have certain scans he farms them out to a medical service 100 miles away - they send a team to this area. They are out of network and ask to be paid on the spot before they proceed. 

 

It's a racket for sure.

 

It's getting so bad for some, they'd be better off telling the facility they have no insurance and let the government grant monies pick up the tab. 

 

Can't in-network providers provide the services you need?   Did you ask your doctor to outsource services only to in-network providers?     The doc's admin should know be able to do that.

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Can't in-network providers provide the services you need?   Did you ask your doctor to outsource services only to in-network providers?     The doc's admin should know be able to do that.

 

Yes, in-network providers (in my area just blocks away!) can provide these services. When my doctor wanted me to have this last imaging, he said he was going to send me to the hospital as an outpatient - I said WHOA, doc! My policy only covers 80% of that in-hospital service... I can't afford the deductible. He then sent me to an in-network specialist who had me go to an in-network imaging service just two blocks from my doctor's office.. right across the street from the hospital. All I had to pay was a small co-pay at the specialist.

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'Public Option' is NOT the answer--

 

"Last week an intensive campaign was initiated in support of a “public option”—offering the choice of a public, nonprofit insurance plan which competes with private health plans. Our enthusiasm should be tempered.

Following are a couple of points to keep in mind, especially when you hear promises that the public option is a giant step towards single payer:

  • A public option will be only one more player in our costly, fragmented system of funding health care. It alone will bring us none of the important features of a single payer system such as efficiency, equity, systemic cost savings, and universality. The profoundly wasteful administrative complexity will remain............(see more)

When the public option is enacted, it will be mislabeled as single payer, and then it will be exposed for the miserable failure that it will be because it was designed by the private insurance industry to fail (like the co-ops). The single payer concept will have been tarnished, and it could be decades before our nation would recover and be ready for reform that really works.

In the meantime, millions would have gone broke, suffered, and died merely because we didn’t think single payer was feasible.....

 

http://www.commondreams.org/views/2016/09/19/public-option-back-our-enthusiasm-should-be-tempered

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I went for a checkup today. It went well. The most annoying thing about it was getting home. My doctor is in a huge medical center just south (1/2 mile) of the UN, and traffic was a nightmare. I believe in the UN, I'm glad it's in NY, but I wish they would make such a theatrical affair out of its opening every year!

 

But to the point: Most of the better doctors in NYC are affiliated with the big medical centers -- NYU, Columbia, Cornell, Mount Sinai. In the last few years, they've actually become direct employees of the centers, rather than faculty who have their private offices on the premises. This has meant that, as employees, they don't really care about insurance, since they are salaried employees. So they tend to take most private insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, etc. It's a good system.

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I went for a checkup today. It went well. The most annoying thing about it was getting home. My doctor is in a huge medical center just south (1/2 mile) of the UN, and traffic was a nightmare. I believe in the UN, I'm glad it's in NY, but I wish they would make such a theatrical affair out of its opening every year!

 

But to my point: Most of the better doctors in NYC are affiliated with the big medical centers -- NYU, Columbia, Cornell, Mount Sinai. In the last few years, they've actually become direct employees of the centers, rather than faculty who have their private offices on the premises. This has meant that, as employees, they don't really care about insurance, since they are salaried employees. So they tend to take posh insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, etc. It's a good system.

the problem with going to the doctor for a checkup is they like to stick ya. it's their hobby!...and I'm ascared of needles. :o

 

I'm a big baby. I admit it. :lol:

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