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Off Topic: Speedracer5's Nick at Nite Thread

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Hmm.  Interesting.

 

Good thing he got away from Moran.  Have you seen what she looks like lately? Yikes! Though perhaps if she'd have stayed with Baio, she wouldn't have turned out how she did.  One thing I'll say for Baio, he seems to have turned out to be a decent guy--even if he stars in one of the Nick-at-Nite original programs that was created for the new Nick at Nite that ruined my beloved 1990s Nick at Nite.

 

I always enjoyed Charles in Charge, though I thought it was strange that high school kids needed a babysitter.

 

"...Charles in Charge of my days and my nights.  Charles in Charge of my wrongs and my rights... I want! I want! I want Charles in Charge of me..."

 

I think the 1980s was the last era of truly great television theme songs.

 

 

I love the CHARLES IN CHARGE theme, especially the version from Season 1.

 

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Sandra Gould played Gladys a little nastier, like she was on a mission to expose the witches so I didn't have as much sympathy for the mental torment she suffered.

 

YES! Great point Holden!

I did find it satisfying when she "saw" something and no one else did, heh.

 

Amazing anyone could "like" my post, when the word "s p a s t i c" is blocked out to describe Dick York. Huh? How can that word be offensive?

 

Well, I just got in season 1 of MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW. I barely recall the introductory episode except for her "interview" with Lou Grant. All the charactors were introduced and I was struck by how gorgeous Valerie Harper was and how incredibly funny Cloris Leachman was. I had forgotten all about Bess, her daughter-terrific child actress.

 

 

 

I also wrote [that word] originally to describe Dick York's portrayal of Darrin but I changed it to "spazzy" when I saw the original word was blocked.

 

I wrote earlier that Valerie Harper never really looked overweight when Rhoda was supposed to be struggling with her weight.

The wardrobe department just dressed her in bulkier clothes.

Cloris Leachman was hilarious as Phyllis Lindstrom, a self-absorbed person who lacked self-awareness.

Even though Rhoda and Phyllis clashed on the show, Valerie Harper and Cloris Leachman were practically presidents of each other's admiration society. 

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I wrote earlier that Valerie Harper never really looked overweight when Rhoda was supposed to be struggling with her weight.

The wardrobe department just dressed her in bulkier clothes.

 

She didn't really look overweight, at the least by today's standards, but when her own show Rhoda came out she was noticeably thinner (I love Rhoda and have some DVDs)

 

Valerie Harper was a Weight Watchers spokesperson, if I'm recalling right.

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She didn't really look overweight, at the least by today's standards, but when her own show Rhoda came out she was noticeably thinner (I love Rhoda and have some DVDs)

Compared to Mary and Phyliss anyone would be considered overweight. She was thinner though when she had her own show. I loved those shows at the time. I was single and living on my own and a young working woman in NY for most of the time MTM was on and I always watched. They were important shows for women at the time

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Compared to Mary and Phyliss anyone would be considered overweight. She was thinner though when she had her own show. I loved those shows at the time. I was single and living on my own and a young working woman in NY for most of the time MTM was on and I always watched. They were important shows for women at the time

 

As an aside, I love Joe!  (On Rhoda.) I know the characters' relationship was rocky, to say the least, but I could fall for Joe in a heartbeat.  David Groh was a good actor and he really did convey that he loved Rhoda.

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She didn't really look overweight, at the least by today's standards, but when her own show Rhoda came out she was noticeably thinner (I love Rhoda and have some DVDs)

 

Valerie Harper was a Weight Watchers spokesperson, if I'm recalling right.

 

Yes, Valerie Harper did lose around 30 pounds on Weight Watchers, but even before the weight loss Rhoda was more "Hollywood" overweight than real-life overweight.

 

Here's Valerie Harper as Rhoda from THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW Season 1 episode "Bess, You Is My Daughter Now"  when Rhoda was  supposedly fat:

 

MTMS1BessYouIsMyDaughterNow3.jpg

 

And here she is from the Season 3 episode "Rhoda The Beautiful" when Rhoda's weight loss was first written into the show:

 

Valerie+Harper+Rhoda+the+Beautiful+6.jpg

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Re: Rhoda's weight.

 

I agree.  She was never overweight.  They just made her look chunky by always having her in sweats or shapeless dresses or nightgowns.  Whereas, Mary would always be wearing very formfitting pants, dresses and sweaters.  There's a first season episode (I believe it's the one where Mary and Rhoda go to the divorced people's club hoping to take advantage of the club's free charter flights to Paris) where Mary and Rhoda are exercising.  Rhoda's wearing an enormous sweatsuit and Mary has on a leotard and T-shirt.  Obviously, Mary is going to look a lot better.  If only doing that exercise would give me Mary's figure, lol.  I'd have to also figure out how to grow about 6 inches too.  In the episodes where Rhoda was able to wear better fitting clothes, like in the one you posted of Rhoda in the lotus position, I agree that she looked gorgeous.  I don't know why Rhoda had such a hard time finding a date.

 

Remember this infamous dress that Mary wears?  Remember she meets that woman in jail and then later, the woman comes to Mary saying she wants to go "straight" so to speak and tells Mary that she has a passion for designing clothes and this is what she designs for Mary...

 

mary-tyler-moore-show-season-5-21-you-tr

 

Only Mary could make this horribly tacky dress look somewhat not as bad.  Lol.

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Only Mary could make this horribly tacky dress look somewhat not as bad. Lol.

That dress looks like something Cher would wear, lol.

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Holden, do you know which episode that green dress is in? I want to watch it now. Lol.

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Holden, do you know which episode that green dress is in? I want to watch it now. Lol.

 

 

It's from "You Try To Be A Nice Guy" from Season 5

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It's from "You Try To Be A Nice Guy" from Season 5


 

Wow, you youngsters always amaze me. How do you keep "episode titles" in your brain? The best I can do is say, "oh that was the one that so & so did whatever...."

 

Maybe the fact that I only saw them once or twice around in the 70's absolves me of memory issues. 

That dress is hilarious!

I'm going to just love binge watching this series! Thanks Holden for mentioning how good the show is, it IS.

 

As for Rhoda's weight- I will say in episode 1 where we first see her, I was actually taken aback by her caboose. She was in stretch pants & a simple shirt, and I absolutely noticed her figure. She had the classic pear shape of thunder thighs & big back end. It did not look like the Valerie Harper I was familiar with.

She must have seen how she photographed and hit the gym immediately. She definitely slimmed down throughout the duration of the show, and then was in thin thin shape for her own show.

 

But sadly, in that first episode, and esp next to those other two skinny minnies, yes...Valerie Harper was a chunk.
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As an aside, I love Joe!  (On Rhoda.) I know the characters' relationship was rocky, to say the least, but I could fall for Joe in a heartbeat.  David Groh was a good actor and he really did convey that he loved Rhoda.

 

I can't help thinking that the relationships of these characters were pretty close to the challenges we were facing in our own marriages at the time.  The same subjects kept coming up.

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I can't help thinking that the relationships of these characters were pretty close to the challenges we were facing in our own marriages at the time.  The same subjects kept coming up.

 

 

Valerie Harper was originally apprehensive about the idea of having Rhoda Morgenstern get married so quickly --- Rhoda and Joe married on the 8th episode of the first season of RHODA--- because she felt that viewers saw Rhoda as a single woman.

She was also worried about the reaction of viewers when the writers decided to have Rhoda and Joe separate and ultimately divorce.

RHODA was doing well in the ratings when the decision was made to break up the couple. Usually drastic changes are only made when a show is not doing well.

But the writers complained that they were having trouble writing a comedy about the happily married couple. Rhoda's sister Brenda was a less sassy version of Rhoda from THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW, and the writers were finding it easier to write for Brenda than for Rhoda and Joe.  

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Valerie Harper was originally apprehensive about the idea of having Rhoda Morgenstern get married so quickly --- Rhoda and Joe married on the 8th episode of the first season of RHODA--- because she felt that viewers saw Rhoda as a single woman.

She was also worried about the reaction of viewers when the writers decided to have Rhoda and Joe separate and ultimately divorce.

RHODA was doing well in the ratings when the decision was made to break up the couple. Usually drastic changes are only made when a show is not doing well.

But the writers complained that they were having trouble writing a comedy about the happily married couple. Rhoda's sister Brenda was a less sassy version of Rhoda from THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW, and the writers were finding it easier to write for Brenda than for Rhoda and Joe.  

 

What's interesting about Rhoda and Joe though, is their divorce.  Are there any other shows made before Rhoda that actually had characters divorce during the show? The 1950s featured married couples and the 1960s had married couples and widow/widowers.   It is assumed that Carol was divorced in The Brady Bunch, but it's never mentioned and the show starts with Mike and Carol marrying.  After the second season, the family acts like they've been together the entire time--only the first season deals with the kids adjusting to having a new parent.  

 

But before Rhoda, I don't recall a couple who are regular characters actually divorcing during the show.  I can't remember if Joe remains a cast member after he breaks up with Rhoda.  I know in some episodes of 'MTM' divorce is discussed and I suppose Lou and wife Edie did get a divorce during the course of the show, but Edie wasn't a regular character.  

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What's interesting about Rhoda and Joe though, is their divorce.  Are there any other shows made before Rhoda that actually had characters divorce during the show? The 1950s featured married couples and the 1960s had married couples and widow/widowers.   It is assumed that Carol was divorced in The Brady Bunch, but it's never mentioned and the show starts with Mike and Carol marrying.  After the second season, the family acts like they've been together the entire time--only the first season deals with the kids adjusting to having a new parent.  

 

But before Rhoda, I don't recall a couple who are regular characters actually divorcing during the show.  I can't remember if Joe remains a cast member after he breaks up with Rhoda.  I know in some episodes of 'MTM' divorce is discussed and I suppose Lou and wife Edie did get a divorce during the course of the show, but Edie wasn't a regular character.  

 

I think that Rhoda and Joe were the first central characters on a weekly TV show that divorced during the course of the show. (Were there prime time soap operas in the mid-1970s or earlier?)

As you mentioned Lou and Edie Grant divorced on THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW  but Edie did not appear regularly on the show as you also mentioned.

 

Joe did not remain a regular character after his split with Rhoda. He appeared in only nine episodes in Season 3. David Groh, who played Joe, received hate mail. Audiences were especially stunned when Joe revealed during marriage counseling (in the episode "Two Little Words . . .Marriage Counselor")  that he never wanted to get married in the first place. He wanted for he and Rhoda to live together, but he felt pressured by her to get married. In "The Ultimatum,"  Rhoda tells Joe he can either try to make the marriage work or she's going to start seeing other people. His response is that she should see other people. I think this episode is Joe's final appearance.

The divorce is finalized at the beginning of Season 4.

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It's from "You Try To Be A Nice Guy" from Season 5

 

Lol.  I'm watching this episode right now! 

 

I haven't gotten to "the dress" yet, but I did laugh when Georgette advises former prostitute Sherry of an open position at the car rental agency where she works.  Georgette asks her: "Do you have experience working with the public?"

 

The funniest part, aside from the green dress, is Ted's reaction to seeing Mary in the dress.  "YOU'RE MAKING ME CRAZY!" He says.

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I think that Rhoda and Joe were the first central characters on a weekly TV show that divorced during the course of the show. (Were there prime time soap operas in the mid-1970s or earlier?)

As you mentioned Lou and Edie Grant divorced on THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW  but Edie did not appear regularly on the show as you also mentioned.

 

Joe did not remain a regular character after his split with Rhoda. He appeared in only nine episodes in Season 3. David Groh, who played Joe, received hate mail. Audiences were especially stunned when Joe revealed during marriage counseling (in the episode "Two Little Words . . .Marriage Counselor")  that he never wanted to get married in the first place. He wanted for he and Rhoda to live together, but he felt pressured by her to get married. In "The Ultimatum,"  Rhoda tells Joe he can either try to make the marriage work or she's going to start seeing other people. His response is that she should see other people. I think this episode is Joe's final appearance.

The divorce is finalized at the beginning of Season 4.

 

Thanks for getting me up to speed about Joe and Rhoda.  I remember his detachment (though back in day I don't recall giving his behavior a label like that) and the divorce.  I remember thinking the divorce wasn't the evil-tinged revenge-fests we would see later in other series.  I wouldn't see a show with multiple exes in relative harmony until Cybill --remember that one? I am watching that on Hulu.

 

Still, I would rather see the reality of divorce in a comedy than the contrived story line of the attractive formerly married are now widowed.  It always bugged me that the sit-com series always had to have single parents as widowed.  Another single dad or mom had killed off the first spouse...  

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What's interesting about Rhoda and Joe though, is their divorce.  Are there any other shows made before Rhoda that actually had characters divorce during the show? The 1950s featured married couples and the 1960s had married couples and widow/widowers.   It is assumed that Carol was divorced in The Brady Bunch, but it's never mentioned and the show starts with Mike and Carol marrying.  After the second season, the family acts like they've been together the entire time--only the first season deals with the kids adjusting to having a new parent.  

 

But before Rhoda, I don't recall a couple who are regular characters actually divorcing during the show.  I can't remember if Joe remains a cast member after he breaks up with Rhoda.  I know in some episodes of 'MTM' divorce is discussed and I suppose Lou and wife Edie did get a divorce during the course of the show, but Edie wasn't a regular character.  

 

I mention this with Holden, but I think the idea of single parents in comedy is just too tempting for the producers to ignore as situation character gold, but at the time producers thought widowhood is more socially acceptable for character background than divorce.  Now why we could accept a life partner's death as comedy basis for the new relationship I cannot explain.   The scenario of the fish out of water/stranger in a strange land environment is new discovery with every episode and keeps them fresh.  Married couples aren't suppose to have this environment, it's just not believable, especially if there are children in the marriage, but 2nd time around marriages with kids...  After watching All in the Family, MTM, Rhoda, Bob Newhart, the Jeffersons, even Sanford and Son, I just wasn't buying the premise of The Brady Bunch and that style of sit-com anymore, though I can see why it would be a fond recall for the generation behind me with the different personalities of the kids.  the kids were the real stars of that show to me.  

 

I Love Lucy did situation comedy best, and while I watched and loved Father Knows Best, it did a type of show that fit that decade beautifully and will be always sweetly nostalgic for me.  

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I mention this with Holden, but I think the idea of single parents in comedy is just too tempting for the producers to ignore as situation character gold, but at the time producers thought widowhood is more socially acceptable for character background than divorce.  Now why we could accept a life partner's death as comedy basis for the new relationship I cannot explain.   The scenario of the fish out of water/stranger in a strange land environment is new discovery with every episode and keeps them fresh.  Married couples aren't suppose to have this environment, it's just not believable, especially if there are children in the marriage, but 2nd time around marriages with kids...  After watching All in the Family, MTM, Rhoda, Bob Newhart, the Jeffersons, even Sanford and Son, I just wasn't buying the premise of The Brady Bunch and that style of sit-com anymore, though I can see why it would be a fond recall for the generation behind me with the different personalities of the kids.  the kids were the real stars of that show to me.  

 

I Love Lucy did situation comedy best, and while I watched and loved Father Knows Best, it did a type of show that fit that decade beautifully and will be always sweetly nostalgic for me.  

 

For me, since I didn't grow up with all these shows being new, I'm familiar with them through Nick-at-Nite for the most part.  Now thank goodness for Hulu and other things of that ilk, because I can catch up with shows I never saw very often, like Mister Ed.  Lol. 

 

I Love Lucy is/was my favorite show on Nick at Nite.  Even though there are some dated ideas and behaviors (I do cringe in the 2 or 3 episodes where Ricky spanks Lucy) I just remember that this show is indicative of the times.  I can look past the idea that Ricky is the man of the castle so to speak and watch the show for what it is--an incredibly clever, funny deviation from the typical family fare. 

 

I used to watch Leave it to Beaver on occasion and while the show had it's moments, I found it incredibly hokey.  It's supposed to represent the idyllic 1950s nuclear family, but I tired of the "golly gee whiz" type dialogue.  I also didn't like how June deferred all punishment of Wally and Beaver to Ward, but recognize that again that's indicative of the times.  My favorite character on the show was Eddie Haskell, because he was so smarmy. 

 

I've seen a couple episodes of Father Knows Best and The Donna Reed Show, but I remember not thinking much about either of them.  I remember thinking that they seemed like a slightly blander Leave it to Beaver.  Maybe I didn't see the "right" episodes.

 

The 1960s shows that I remember watching: The Dick Van Dyke Show, I Dream of Jeannie, Green Acres, The Munsters, The Andy Griffith Show and Bewitched, I liked all those very much.  I liked 'Dick Van Dyke' because of all the physical comedy.  Though the actor who played Ritchie may very well be the worst child actor that has ever been on the screen.  He was always yelling all his lines.  Shut up Ritchie! I liked the magic shows, 'Jeannie' and Bewitched, because they were fun.  I preferred 'Jeannie' because it was wackier, but I liked Bewitched too, especially when all of Samantha's ridiculous relatives visited.   The 1960s seemed to be the time of the absurd sitcom (The Munsters, The Addams Family, The Beverly Hillbillies, Green Acres, The Monkees, to name a few), while I loved The Munsters, I did not like The Addams Family.  While I loved Green Acres, I was not a fan of The Beverly Hillbillies or Petticoat Junction.  The Monkees was a terrible show.  The best thing about it was the music.  I remember one year on Nick-at-Nite, The Monkees was selected for "Monkee Mondays" on Block Party Summer and it must have had such bad ratings that halfway through the summer, it was swapped out for The Munsters.  

 

The Brady Bunch I love.  I can't explain why, I know that many people don't like this show, but I do.  I love it because it's so corny and overly saccharine at times, but it is oddly charming.  The music, their awesome house (I would totally live in that house), the silly situations and songs, the clothes, everything.  I love this show and it is one of my favorite 1970s shows.  I also loved the women-centric shows like The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Rhoda.  I was never a big fan of That Girl though.  Marlo Thomas seemed like a more flighty version of Mary Tyler Moore.  That Girl was lacking the smart scripts and the great ensemble that The Mary Tyler Moore Show had.  When I was younger, I remember some of the other 1970s shows joined the lineup: All in the Family, The Jeffersons, Sanford and Son, to name a few and I never liked those shows.  I thought they were boring.  I know that Welcome Back Kotter and Taxi were also part of the lineup at one point and I hated both of those shows.  I remember The Bob Newhart Show, but I never really saw many episodes, I remember thinking it was kind of boring--but I never thought The Mary Tyler Moore Show was boring, it was always one of my favorites.  

 

Perhaps now that I'm 30-something instead of a teenager, there are some shows I need to revisit. 

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For me, since I didn't grow up with all these shows being new, I'm familiar with them through Nick-at-Nite for the most part.  Now thank goodness for Hulu and other things of that ilk, because I can catch up with shows I never saw very often, like Mister Ed.  Lol. 

 

I Love Lucy is/was my favorite show on Nick at Nite.  Even though there are some dated ideas and behaviors (I do cringe in the 2 or 3 episodes where Ricky spanks Lucy) I just remember that this show is indicative of the times.  I can look past the idea that Ricky is the man of the castle so to speak and watch the show for what it is--an incredibly clever, funny deviation from the typical family fare. 

 

I used to watch Leave it to Beaver on occasion and while the show had it's moments, I found it incredibly hokey.  It's supposed to represent the idyllic 1950s nuclear family, but I tired of the "golly gee whiz" type dialogue.  I also didn't like how June deferred all punishment of Wally and Beaver to Ward, but recognize that again that's indicative of the times.  My favorite character on the show was Eddie Haskell, because he was so smarmy. 

 

I've seen a couple episodes of Father Knows Best and The Donna Reed Show, but I remember not thinking much about either of them.  I remember thinking that they seemed like a slightly blander Leave it to Beaver.  Maybe I didn't see the "right" episodes.

 

The 1960s shows that I remember watching: The Dick Van Dyke Show, I Dream of Jeannie, Green Acres, The Munsters, The Andy Griffith Show and Bewitched, I liked all those very much.  I liked 'Dick Van Dyke' because of all the physical comedy.  Though the actor who played Ritchie may very well be the worst child actor that has ever been on the screen.  He was always yelling all his lines.  Shut up Ritchie! I liked the magic shows, 'Jeannie' and Bewitched, because they were fun.  I preferred 'Jeannie' because it was wackier, but I liked Bewitched too, especially when all of Samantha's ridiculous relatives visited.   The 1960s seemed to be the time of the absurd sitcom (The Munsters, The Addams Family, The Beverly Hillbillies, Green Acres, The Monkees, to name a few), while I loved The Munsters, I did not like The Addams Family.  While I loved Green Acres, I was not a fan of The Beverly Hillbillies or Petticoat Junction.  The Monkees was a terrible show.  The best thing about it was the music.  I remember one year on Nick-at-Nite, The Monkees was selected for "Monkee Mondays" on Block Party Summer and it must have had such bad ratings that halfway through the summer, it was swapped out for The Munsters.  

 

The Brady Bunch I love.  I can't explain why, I know that many people don't like this show, but I do.  I love it because it's so corny and overly saccharine at times, but it is oddly charming.  The music, their awesome house (I would totally live in that house), the silly situations and songs, the clothes, everything.  I love this show and it is one of my favorite 1970s shows.  I also loved the women-centric shows like The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Rhoda.  I was never a big fan of That Girl though.  Marlo Thomas seemed like a more flighty version of Mary Tyler Moore.  That Girl was lacking the smart scripts and the great ensemble that The Mary Tyler Moore Show had.  When I was younger, I remember some of the other 1970s shows joined the lineup: All in the Family, The Jeffersons, Sanford and Son, to name a few and I never liked those shows.  I thought they were boring.  I know that Welcome Back Kotter and Taxi were also part of the lineup at one point and I hated both of those shows.  I remember The Bob Newhart Show, but I never really saw many episodes, I remember thinking it was kind of boring--but I never thought The Mary Tyler Moore Show was boring, it was always one of my favorites.  

 

Perhaps now that I'm 30-something instead of a teenager, there are some shows I need to revisit. 

 

 

It's funny how time and perspective will change your viewpoint.  The age you discover these shows and how you feel about them later.  I liked some you probably never heard of, and I had to look them up myself to make sure I sticking with the 1960s to 70s.  The old days before cable (even before videotape at home!).   I had two older brothers and so we watched sometimes their favorites on the one TV (don't feel too sorry for me; most folks had one TV).  Also, the parents had veto power in the evening, so I wasn't exposed to everything I wanted to see.  I liked Dick Van Dyke, and Danny Thomas, but we also watched Get Smart, McHales's Navy (cute guys), Hogan's Heroes, F Troop (see the influence of older brothers!) and the family watched the aforementioned Father Knows Best (which I liked) and The Donna Reed Show (which I didn't care for), The Real McCoys,  Andy Griffith Show, Car 54-Where Are You?, Beverly Hillbillies, and Dobie Gillis (parents voting on last 5) . I don't think my mother ever missed an episode of Perry Mason, and my dad got me hooked on Wagon Train.   I remember loving The Patty Duke Show -- mostly because she had her own TV show and just a few years older than I. I also loved Gidget, because of Sally Field, but then not that big a fan of The Flying Nun.  Sunday nights were for Ed Sullivan and Bonanza.  

 

By the time my brothers had grown and moved out, it was the strange era of sit-com with Gilligan and Munsters and Addams family (didn't care for the TV show-but loved the movies) then along came the saccharine sweet family sit-coms Family Affair and that sort, along with the Partridge Family. It's like they were all for younger kids.   I was by now grown up and so had television, lol.  at least for CBS on Saturday nights, ending with the perfect Carol Burnett Show.

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It's funny how time and perspective will change your viewpoint.  The age you discover these shows and how you feel about them later.  I liked some you probably never heard of, and I had to look them up myself to make sure I sticking with the 1960s to 70s.  The old days before cable (even before videotape at home!).   I had two older brothers and so we watched sometimes their favorites on the one TV (don't feel too sorry for me; most folks had one TV).  Also, the parents had veto power in the evening, so I wasn't exposed to everything I wanted to see.  I liked Dick Van Dyke, and Danny Thomas, but we also watched Get Smart, McHales's Navy (cute guys), Hogan's Heroes, F Troop (see the influence of older brothers!) and the family watched the aforementioned Father Knows Best (which I liked) and The Donna Reed Show (which I didn't care for), The Real McCoys,  Andy Griffith Show, Car 54-Where Are You?, Beverly Hillbillies, and Dobie Gillis (parents voting on last 5) . I don't think my mother ever missed an episode of Perry Mason, and my dad got me hooked on Wagon Train.   I remember loving The Patty Duke Show -- mostly because she had her own TV show and just a few years older than I. I also loved Gidget, because of Sally Field, but then not that big a fan of The Flying Nun.  Sunday nights were for Ed Sullivan and Bonanza.  

 

By the time my brothers had grown and moved out, it was the strange era of sit-com with Gilligan and Munsters and Addams family (didn't care for the TV show-but loved the movies) then along came the saccharine sweet family sit-coms Family Affair and that sort, along with the Partridge Family. It's like they were all for younger kids.   I was by now grown up and so had television, lol.  at least for CBS on Saturday nights, ending with the perfect Carol Burnett Show.

 

Lol.  I've heard of all the shows you mentioned.  I believe I have seen an episode of Dobie Gillis.  I think at one time it was on TVLand in its infancy.  I also watched Love American Style during the early days of TVLand as well. 

 

I love Gidget.  Sally Field is adorable.  I agree that Flying Nun is not good.  That show is stupid.  I wish there were more Gidget episodes and less Flying Nun episodes.  

 

I have probably seen every episode of Gilligan's Island, not because it was a favorite show of mine, but it used to be on TV in the mornings before school.  I would see Gilligan's Island and then Little House on the Prairie.  I think I've seen every episode of 'Little House' too.  

 

I always thought The Partridge Family was annoying, but I love The Brady Bunch

 

There aren't many 80s sitcoms that I enjoyed that much.  I liked Cheers, Night Court, Charles in Charge and The Facts of Life.  I also liked some of the kid shows like Punky Brewster and Full House.  A lot of the 80s family shows, like Family Ties, for example, I thought were really lame.  However, like I said earlier, the 80s were the last decade of truly great theme songs.  I was never a big fan of Growing Pains, but I liked the theme song.  Often times, I would watch the beginning just to hear the song and once the show started, I'd change the channel.

 

"...Show me that smile again. (Show me that smile). Don't waste another minute on your cryin'. We're nowhere near the end (we're nowhere near), the best is ready to begin!"

 

Sadly, I recited that from memory.  Someday, my knowledge of TV Show theme songs will come in handy again.  One time at trivia, my knowledge of the Who's the Boss? theme song got me some major points for my team.  Lol. 

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I just read that a movie based on the TV series THREE'S COMPANY is in the works.

According to reports, the movie will be set in the 1970s. 

I used to enjoy the show when it aired on Nick At Nite especailly the episodes with Suzanne Somers.

And Don Knotts (and his wardrobe) was hilarious as Mr. Furley.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9bJvPmFzuY

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I just read that a movie based on the TV series THREE'S COMPANY is in the works.

According to reports, the movie will be set in the 1970s. 

I used to enjoy the show when it aired on Nick At Nite especailly the episodes with Suzanne Somers.

And Don Knotts (and his wardrobe) was hilarious as Mr. Furley.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9bJvPmFzuY

Mr. Furley cracked me up. Jack was always my favorite character. I also liked Mrs. Roper and all her fabulous caftans.

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Mr. Furley cracked me up. Jack was always my favorite character. I also liked Mrs. Roper and all her fabulous caftans.

 

I saw Norman Fell (Mr. Roper) the other night on an episode of The Fugitive.  He played a law enforcer bigwig (lieutenant or captain or somesuch).  He still looked exactly the same, with the same monotone voice, but obviously a lot younger. ;)

 

I had a HUGE crush on John Ritter as a young teenager.  I used to cut pictures of him out of magazines.  Sad to say, though, I can't get into Three's Company anymore.  It's a little too silly for me.

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I saw Norman Fell (Mr. Roper) the other night on an episode of The Fugitive.  He played a law enforcer bigwig (lieutenant or captain or somesuch).  He still looked exactly the same, with the same monotone voice, but obviously a lot younger. ;)

 

I had a HUGE crush on John Ritter as a young teenager.  I used to cut pictures of him out of magazines.  Sad to say, though, I can't get into Three's Company anymore.  It's a little too silly for me.

Lol.  Norman Fell surprisingly shows up in a lot of 1960s films.  He always looks and acts the same.  He's in the Debbie Reynolds/Tony Curtis film, The Rat Race.  I remember thinking: "Oh look. Mr. Roper showed up to fix Debbie's phone." 

 

I would watch Three's Company when it was on (I cannot remember if it was ever part of the Nick-at-Nite lineup, I know it was on TVLand.  I cannot remember if it was one of the shows that started on Nick-at-Nite but moved to TVLand) because I think it was on in-between shows that I regularly watched.  My favorite episodes were the Mr. Furley ones--he had the greatest wardrobe!

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