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tilden72

Twlight Zone Episodes

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I believe it was shown in the early part of the first season. If he was

lucky enough to find the right prescription, he'd be in business.

 

Arlene Martel was in an episode of Gunsmoke today, playing an

Indian. She had quite distinctive features.

 

Twenty Two was inspired by one of the segments of Dead of Night,

which used the same catchphrase, Room for one more. I didn't

find it that spooky since Barbara Nichols was playing her usual

bimbo role and with all the showbiz patter took away quite a bit

of the creepiness. And being on tape only made it look cheap.

 

I'm serous, I found it surprisingly gripping even though just reading the wiki page (as mentioned earlier, I did not know the story). It should be ridiculous just saying that, but I guess I'm easy.

 

There was no photo of sweet Arlene so she did not help with the drama. I didn't see that image until later. What a nifty little story. Someone should write a short story from the drama, it might be quite effective.

 

The bimbo quality might have helped with the role, though ... she was not to be believed by others in the story, that kind of persona might have worked for that.

 

Damn, I would like to see this. U-tube?

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Last Christmas somebody got me a three disc DVD set of "Twilight zone" episodes.  That episode is among them.

 

Should be available on other DVD releases.  I'd suggest getting one of THEM.

 

THEN you could watch it on a proper TV set, and NOT a YouTube clip on a desktop PC, or on a phone, or some such crap.

 

I've never found this episode to be very frightening or particularily gripping.  Even when first seeing it at nine years old or so.  But, the subject matter WAS interesting,

 

This is one of the more distinctive facets of the show.  Unlike predecessors "One Step Beyond" or the challenging "Outer Limits", "Zone" ran the gamut from paranormal, science fiction and theology(different takes on just what IS Heaven or Hell.). While the other two concentrated more on one or another. ("Step" the paranormal, "Limits" the sci-fi).  "Twilight Zone" not only gave you stories that you'd remember,  but stories that gave you something to THINK about!

 

 

Sepiatone

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Notice how many of the stories, either Beaumont, Matheson or Serling written, seem to deal a lot with the human condition.

 

The faults, virtues, frailties and presumptions of the creature known as "man".   Many episodes are based in a sort of "give any human an inch and he'll try for a mile" spirit, and some make us out(and a very few of us) to be more than we've so far been able to display.

 

But, on the lighter side, ..............

 

Anyone else here ever notice in the episode with William Shatner "Nightmare At 20,000 Feet", the "gremlin" on the wing-----his feet has those white "rubber" soles much like the "footie" pajamas my KIDS used to wear when they were about two-three years old!  :D

 

It's as if they really didn't TRY too hard to NOT make it look like some guy in a costume.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Notice how many of the stories, either Beaumont, Matheson or Serling written, seem to deal a lot with the human condition.

 

The faults, virtues, frailties and presumptions of the creature known as "man".   Many episodes are based in a sort of "give any human an inch and he'll try for a mile" spirit, and some make us out(and a very few of us) to be more than we've so far been able to display.

 

But, on the lighter side, ..............

 

Anyone else here ever notice in the episode with William Shatner "Nightmare At 20,000 Feet", the "gremlin" on the wing-----his feet has those white "rubber" soles much like the "footie" pajamas my KIDS used to wear when they were about two-three years old!  :D

 

It's as if they really didn't TRY too hard to NOT make it look like some guy in a costume.

 

 

Sepiatone

The "human condition"? What else would the stories deal with? That's about as all-encompassing a classification as you can get.

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The "human condition"? What else would the stories deal with? That's about as all-encompassing a classification as you can get.

 

I see Sepia's post meaning that the stories (often or sometimes) raise to a level beyond frivolous storytelling. The term "human condition" has a definition a little more specific than the "all-encompassing" definition that you suggest. I won't offer one right now because it's not that simple and definitions can vary but the term has it's own Wiki page and there other references on Google that you could look into if you're interested enough.

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I see Sepia's post meaning that the stories (often or sometimes) raise to a level beyond frivolous storytelling. The term "human condition" has a definition a little more specific than the "all-encompassing" definition that you suggest. I won't offer one right now because it's not that simple and definitions can vary but the term has it's own Wiki page and there other references on Google that you could look into if you're interested enough.

They obviously go far past frivolous storytelling. That's why TZ is arguably the favorite TV series ever of the people on these boards, and many others as well..

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They obviously go far past frivolous storytelling. That's why TZ is arguably the favorite TV series ever of the people on these boards, and many others as well..

Before I comment on what I "quoted" all I simply meant by "human condition" was , those thoughts, fears and situations any one of us can relate to.  No matter the situations the characters in the stories were in, their reactions and behaviors were more or less projected in a way most of us might feel, think and do in similar situations. That, and those intrinsic human tendencies we all have in common.

 

TZ, like I LOVE LUCY has even captured the attention of following generations.  I have younger family members, some in their mid teens and early adolescence who eagerly await the frequent "marathons" SCY-FY has every year.  A few even scour stores for DVD compilations/collections.  It's a trip to discuss certain Twilight Zone episodes with younger people who were anywhere from 25 to 30 years away from being born AFTER the show went out of production.  Some did try to "resurrect"  the show, in updated fashion over the years, and they failed miserably due to either the poor storylines, or an attempt to make the show more(as a friend of mine once put it) "Science fictiony" than it ever was originally.

 

Plus, (the "human condition" thing again) many of the episodes were about more than what they seemed   For prime example---Do you really think "The Monsters Are Due On Maple Street" was about MONSTERS?  Or was it really a testament to our sometimes unreasonable fear of the unknown, or assumptions we make about that which we don't understand.?  Or perhaps intolerance?  I do recall the script for it was in a high school textbook I had, and a teacher using it for just that sort of lesson(about intolerance).

 

 

Sepiatone

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Before I comment on what I "quoted" all I simply meant by "human condition" was , those thoughts, fears and situations any one of us can relate to.  No matter the situations the characters in the stories were in, their reactions and behaviors were more or less projected in a way most of us might feel, think and do in similar situations. That, and those intrinsic human tendencies we all have in common.

 

TZ, like I LOVE LUCY has even captured the attention of following generations.  I have younger family members, some in their mid teens and early adolescence who eagerly await the frequent "marathons" SCY-FY has every year.  A few even scour stores for DVD compilations/collections.  It's a trip to discuss certain Twilight Zone episodes with younger people who were anywhere from 25 to 30 years away from being born AFTER the show went out of production.  Some did try to "resurrect"  the show, in updated fashion over the years, and they failed miserably due to either the poor storylines, or an attempt to make the show more(as a friend of mine once put it) "Science fictiony" than it ever was originally.

 

Plus, (the "human condition" thing again) many of the episodes were about more than what they seemed   For prime example---Do you really think "The Monsters Are Due On Maple Street" was about MONSTERS?  Or was it really a testament to our sometimes unreasonable fear of the unknown, or assumptions we make about that which we don't understand.?  Or perhaps intolerance?  I do recall the script for it was in a high school textbook I had, and a teacher using it for just that sort of lesson(about intolerance).

 

 

Sepiatone

 

The "Monsters" episode was one of the very best for reasons you point out. There is something to discuss their in the deeper vein. Remember though that many didn't come close to that. Some were rather ordinary or trite but it's the twisty endings that grab us and that can bond different generations of viewers as well.

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Before I comment on what I "quoted" all I simply meant by "human condition" was , those thoughts, fears and situations any one of us can relate to.  No matter the situations the characters in the stories were in, their reactions and behaviors were more or less projected in a way most of us might feel, think and do in similar situations. That, and those intrinsic human tendencies we all have in common.

 

TZ, like I LOVE LUCY has even captured the attention of following generations.  I have younger family members, some in their mid teens and early adolescence who eagerly await the frequent "marathons" SCY-FY has every year.  A few even scour stores for DVD compilations/collections.  It's a trip to discuss certain Twilight Zone episodes with younger people who were anywhere from 25 to 30 years away from being born AFTER the show went out of production.  Some did try to "resurrect"  the show, in updated fashion over the years, and they failed miserably due to either the poor storylines, or an attempt to make the show more(as a friend of mine once put it) "Science fictiony" than it ever was originally.

 

Plus, (the "human condition" thing again) many of the episodes were about more than what they seemed   For prime example---Do you really think "The Monsters Are Due On Maple Street" was about MONSTERS?  Or was it really a testament to our sometimes unreasonable fear of the unknown, or assumptions we make about that which we don't understand.?  Or perhaps intolerance?  I do recall the script for it was in a high school textbook I had, and a teacher using it for just that sort of lesson(about intolerance).

 

 

Sepiatone

I'm no particular fan of the sci-fi genre, but I love TZ. That's an indication of how remarkable it was.

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Sepiatone is talking about "Number 12 Looks Just like Me"  with Richard Long, Suzy Parker, Collin Wilcox and Pam Austin.  Wilcox's character doesn't want to be transformed from what everybody thinks is plain to beautiful and look like everybody else.  Eventually she is tricked into getting the makeover and ends up looking like BFF Pam aka the "Dodge Rebellion" girl.  This seemed to be a ongoing theme of the series. 

 

The original title of the Donna Douglas episode is "The Private World of Darkness" which is mentioned in the story.  However the "beholder" quote is so well known-and also in the story-that it's what the episode became known by.  When it's shown on TV, neither title is shown.

 

If the elderly lady who sees her husband become young again was Celia Lovsky, I can understand why her performance was so powerful-she couldn't be anything else.  I want to be as beautiful at that age as she was.

 

My personal favorites are "Long Live Walter Jameson", "I am the Night, Color Me Black" and the signoff episode "The Bewitching Pool".  This is the 60's series that had the most effect on my life and how I formed my values. I know, it started in '59 but ran until '64 so I count it as a 60s show.      

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Sepiatone is talking about "Number 12 Looks Just like Me"  with Richard Long, Suzy Parker, Collin Wilcox and Pam Austin.  Wilcox's character doesn't want to be transformed from what everybody thinks is plain to beautiful and look like everybody else.  Eventually she is tricked into getting the makeover and ends up looking like BFF Pam aka the "Dodge Rebellion" girl.  This seemed to be a ongoing theme of the series. 

 

The original title of the Donna Douglas episode is "The Private World of Darkness" which is mentioned in the story.  However the "beholder" quote is so well known-and also in the story-that it's what the episode became known by.  When it's shown on TV, neither title is shown.

 

If the elderly lady who sees her husband become young again was Celia Lovsky, I can understand why her performance was so powerful-she couldn't be anything else.  I want to be as beautiful at that age as she was.

 

My personal favorites are "Long Live Walter Jameson", "I am the Night, Color Me Black" and the signoff episode "The Bewitching Pool".  This is the 60's series that had the most effect on my life and how I formed my values. I know, it started in '59 but ran until '64 so I count it as a 60s show.      

If you include his film work, Serling may be considered the greatest writer for film and/or TV ever. Anyone better?

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If you include his film work, Serling may be considered the greatest writer for film and/or TV ever. Anyone better?

If there is, I have no idea who it could be.  And even if there was, it would in no way diminish Serling's standing as a writer and creative mind.

 

On something you mentioned earlier DGF....

 

Although on several occasions "The Twilight Zone" did touch on some science fiction storylines, I never really considered the show to be a truly "science fiction" program.  Which probably much explains WHY in spite of your not being a fan of the "sci-fi" genre, you still liked "The Twilight Zone".  :)

 

 

Sepiatone

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'Twilight Zone' was an "anthology of strange stories" series.

 

Sci-Fi, religious, philosophical, supernatural, ironical, human-conditional, and horror were all used at times in the service of those stories.

 

I always loved the Lee Marvin episode 'Steel'. Robots are the prize fighters we watch after humans have been banned from taking part, but Lee's robot breaks down so he makes himself up to take its place in the ring. Great episode.

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'Twilight Zone' was an "anthology of strange stories" series.

 

Sci-Fi, religious, philosophical, supernatural, ironical, human-conditional, and horror were all used at times in the service of those stories.

 

I always loved the Lee Marvin episode 'Steel'. Robots are the prize fighters we watch after humans have been banned from taking part, but Lee's robot breaks down so he makes himself up to take its place in the ring. Great episode.

 

I thought of that episode a few years ago while watching the Hugh Jackman film "REAL STEEL"  although Jackman's character never DID disguise himself as a robot, but I wonder if that TZ episode is WHERE the writers of that movie GOT the idea...

 

 

Sepiatone

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I've always liked the one entitled "The Sixteen Millimeter Shrine" with Ida Lupino, in which she plays a sort of Norma Desmond-esque character who is a middle aged actress clinging to the past. Naturally, Ida's acting was spot-on, as it usually is. I also loved the episode "The Hitch Hiker", where the young woman is traveling through the US, and keeps seeing a hitch hiker everywhere she goes.

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I've always liked the one entitled "The Sixteen Millimeter Shrine" with Ida Lupino, in which she plays a sort of Norma Desmond-esque character who is a middle aged actress clinging to the past. 

 

SPOILERS FROM MULTIPLE EPISODES

 

I love the Twilight Zone episodes where the character "disappears" into his scenarios/imagination.  At the end of "Shrine", Ida disappears into the film.  In "A Stop at Willoughby", the main character disappears into the old town.  In "Miniature", the character disappears into the dollhouse.  I love the idea that if you wish for something hard enough, you can defy reality and make it come true...   :)

 

(Although it was a little sad for the James Daly character in "Willoughby".)

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SPOILERS FROM MULTIPLE EPISODES

 

I love the Twilight Zone episodes where the character "disappears" into his scenarios/imagination.  At the end of "Shrine", Ida disappears into the film.  In "A Stop at Willoughby", the main character disappears into the old town.  In "Miniature", the character disappears into the dollhouse.  I love the idea that if you wish for something hard enough, you can defy reality and make it come true...   :)

 

(Although it was a little sad for the James Daly character in "Willoughby".)

 

Not as sad as it was for the Richard Kiley character in an episode of Serling's 'Night Gallery' (a reboot of TZ, just with a different series name). He finds he can wish himself into a peaceful painting - but in the dark he doesn't realize that the painting has been replaced by another of a far less pastoral theme.

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"In Praise of Pip", I think from the 1962-1963 season always gets me.  I was in high school the night it first aired.  When Jack Klugman's character learns his soldier son is dying from battle wounds he roars something like "Where's this Viet Nam?" as if he's never heard of it.  I think most of the American public hadn't yet as the monk's burning themselves in protest of the Diem regime had not started and they would not be overthrown and executed until the summer of 1963.  (If my timeline is off and Fred C Dobbs sees this I will be corrected).  It's just eerie that something that was to have such a profound effect on so many of our lives was almost but not quite known to us.    

 

The ending is also so beautiful in a strange way as we see nobody is completely despicable or incapable of being unselfish when necessary.  The man saves the one decent thing his life has produced completely willing to pay the highest cost. 

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The Sy Fy channel is having a New Years marathon - now through Sunday, Jan. 3.  They have a complete schedule on their website, if you want to find your favorite.

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As usually happens on a week-end like this we get feast or famine" time;  TTZ on one station and the original Death Valley Days on another.  As the DVD are on for the first time in over 40 years they won over TTZ yesterday; I taped a batch of those and am watching them now as I don't find the hour-long ones that appealing.  Tonight I'll tune into the rest of the 30-minute ones.  For the record seeing Stanley "The Old Ranger" Andrews and those marvelous Ruth Woodman scripts again was worth the wait.  TTZ will never be boring no matter how many times we see them.    

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They actually showed The Encounter, the controversial episode with Neville Brand and George Takei that wasn't aired for many years.  It is very strong and unsettling; I will probably watch it again but am not certain I will after that. 

 

I'm not sure I got the intent of the story and don't understand why Arthur killed himself at the end unless it was part of Japanese custom.  Since this episode, like all the others, were badly chopped to make way for repetitious commercials that might be the reason.  At least I finally got to see it.

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