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LoveTheClassics

Changing Times

8 posts in this topic

I seldom post on TCM. com, but I do visit TCM.com to shop and buy movies. Buying seems to be the only alternative for good cinema. I don’t watch TCM much anymore, maybe once a month, because the classics are gone. And, classics are what I thought TCM was known for.  My on-demand provides the same 3 or 4 movies for viewing that stay listed for a month.  I should say that it just isn’t TCM that has changed, it’s TV in general.  I understand now why viewers have turned to Neflix, Hulu, and the like.  Entertainment from the big box is disappearing.

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Welcome! I get what you are saying.

 

It supports, in a way, my efforts in another thread on this board. I have been focusing on golden age of Hollywood films that are available on TCM and the other cable channels, as well as streaming services. 

 

We may have to look harder to find what we consider real classic films-- but they are still there. 

 

http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/49402-tcm-and-other-sources-for-classic-film/

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Thanks for your reply as well as the link. Excellent – thanks for sharing!

No problem! And again, welcome to the message boards.

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Welcome! I get what you are saying.

 

It supports, in a way, my efforts in another thread on this board. I have been focusing on golden age of Hollywood films that are available on TCM and the other cable channels, as well as streaming services. 

 

We may have to look harder to find what we consider real classic films-- but they are still there. 

 

 

 

Funny but the L.A. Times just ran an article saying how T.V. has changed and is now showing MORE 'classic'  (pre-1970), movies and T.V. shows.   

 

Right next to that article was one on Get-TV and their showing of the Judy Garland T.V Show (ran one season 63 - 64), and how Get-TV as well as other networks were featuring these old programs  (e.g.  all the old Carson shows will soon be broadcast).   One very interesting part of the article was how it has become a lot easier to obtain the rights to these broadcast at very low cost.   e.g.  unions have waived or lowered their fees (as well as family members that hold ownership rights).     This being necessary since these stations and this type of programming doesn't attract the target 'younger' demographic.

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Funny but the L.A. Times just ran an article saying how T.V. has changed and is now showing MORE 'classic'  (pre-1970), movies and T.V. shows.   

 

Right next to that article was one on Get-TV and their showing of the Judy Garland T.V Show (ran one season 63 - 64), and how Get-TV as well as other networks were featuring these old programs  (e.g.  all the old Carson shows will soon be broadcast).   One very interesting part of the article was how it has become a lot easier to obtain the rights to these broadcast at very low cost.   e.g.  unions have waived or lowered their fees (as well as family members that hold ownership rights).     This being necessary since these stations and this type of programming doesn't attract the target 'younger' demographic.

The reality is, and we have to face it-- that the older programming primarily appealed to an older generation...and they are dying out. That's life. So the newer generations, who have not developed an appreciation for the older programming (classics from certain decades, whether we're talking about film or TV), are not clamoring to see these shows. That means there is less demand. So that is why the families and rights holders are agreeing to a lower fee/royalty. If there was a huge demand, they wouldn't have to come down one cent. So then we have these newer commercial-driven channels like Me-TV, Get-TV and Antenna-TV doing well-- because they are getting programming at reduced rates but I am sure they still charge advertisers the same or more than what they always charged.

 

But honestly, there is no way I am going to watch Dennis the Menace on Antenna-TV, when I can see it without commercials on Hulu. And I can see any episode at any time-- I don't have to wait for someone at that channel to program the episode I want to see now, at this very minute, today.

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The reality is, and we have to face it-- that the older programming primarily appealed to an older generation...and they are dying out. That's life. So the newer generations, who have not developed an appreciation for the older programming (classics from certain decades, whether we're talking about film or TV), are not clamoring to see these shows. That means there is less demand. So that is why the families and rights holders are agreeing to a lower fee/royalty. If there was a huge demand, they wouldn't have to come down one cent. So then we have these new commercial-driven channels like Me-TV, Get-TV and Antenna-TV doing well-- because they are getting programming at reduced rates but I am sure they still charge advertisers the same or more than what they always charged.

 

Well most of the advertiser on these stations are non-profits;  e.g. wounded warriors,   the humane society and animal rights groups and starving kids in 3rd world countries.   Do these non-profits groups pay less for a time slot?   Does the station get a tax write-off to make up the difference?    

 

What is interesting about really old T.V. is that the commercial sponsors were part of the show.   A few of these companies still exist so they are getting free advertising on shows like Let's Make a Deal  (which is really 90% commercials disguised as a game show).

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What is interesting about really old T.V. is that the commercial sponsors were part of the show.   A few of these companies still exist so they are getting free advertising on shows like Let's Make a Deal  (which is really 90% commercials disguised as a game show).

That applies to old films, too. Recently I watched LOVE HAPPY, the last Marx Brothers film, on Amazon Prime. When I read up on the production history of it, I learned the film ran into financial problems and almost wasn't finished. The only way to complete it, by raising the extra funds, was to invent a rooftop scene where Harpo is chased by some crooks.

 

And as Harpo runs around during that sequence (which lasts for more than five minutes), he whizzes past billboards that flash product information in bright lights. About half those companies are still in existence today. So whoever worked for Wheaties' ad department made a smart decision, because every time that film is seen from 1950 into infinity, Wheaties continues to get on-going advertising from it.

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