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"Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" 1931 Video Movie Review - Fredric March was Incredible!

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Tonight's review is the first horror movie to ever win an Oscar! Fredric March was seriously incredible in the transformation scenes of "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." He was literally a different person when he was Mr. Hyde. This movie will certainly be a must watch every October from now on! You gotta see it!


 


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Well done pre-code Horror film.     Miriam Hopkins isn't a traditional beauty but she is one sexy gal in this film as well as many other pre-code films.     She always bring a lot of energy to the screen and with good direction that didn't cross over into over doing it.

 

  

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Well done pre-code Horror film.     Miriam Hopkins isn't a traditional beauty but she is one sexy gal in this film as well as many other pre-code films.     She always bring a lot of energy to the screen and with good direction that didn't cross over into over doing it.

She certainly did a good job in this. I thought that Rose Hobart as the tavern girl stole the show away from her, though! She was outstanding.

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Ian--good job noting the films' box office take & budget--Good job noting the use of split-screen back then--& noting it was Pre-Code--& noting the supporting cast.  Review ran a little long but was good.

 

Film for a different take on the story:

 

"Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde"--(1971)--TCM's cast is incorrectly billed, except for the director--Google imdb.

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Ian--good job noting the films' box office take & budget--Good job noting the use of split-screen back then--& noting it was Pre-Code--& noting the supporting cast.  Review ran a little long but was good.

 

Film for a different take on the story:

 

"Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde"--(1971)--TCM's cast is incorrectly billed, except for the director--Google imdb.

I usually try to keep my reviews under 10 minutes, but I end up rambling sometimes with movies I really liked haha. I would watch that one for fun! I don't go past the 1960s for my reviews...I'm not a huge fan of that era

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Just watched your view, Ian...

 

Good comment about the film earning an Oscar. 

 

Rose Hobart had a lengthy screen career-- by the 40s, she was a character actress who had occasional leads. See her as Bogart's doomed wife in the film noir CONFLICT (1945). She's very good in that one.

 

Fredric March would earn another Best Actor Oscar in 1946, for THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES.

 

It would have been nice if you had shown a picture (movie still) of the transformation scene. Even if you don't have a book with any photos of it, you could print something off the internet. 

 

Are you going to review the Spencer Tracy-Ingrid Bergman version later?

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Just watched your view, Ian...

 

Good comment about the film earning an Oscar. 

 

Rose Hobart had a lengthy screen career-- by the 40s, she was a character actress who had occasional leads. See her as Bogart's doomed wife in the film noir CONFLICT (1945). She's very good in that one.

 

Fredric March would earn another Best Actor Oscar in 1946, for THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES.

 

It would have been nice if you had shown a picture (movie still) of the transformation scene. Even if you don't have a book with any photos of it, you could print something off the internet. 

 

Are you going to review the Spencer Tracy-Ingrid Bergman version later?

 

Funny I was going to ask the same question related to the Tracy-Bergman version.   Both are high quality "A" production versions so I would be interested in what Ian has to say about this one.   (and as you know a young Lana Turner as well in the remake).

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Funny I was going to ask the same question related to the Tracy-Bergman version.   Both are high quality "A" production versions so I would be interested in what Ian has to say about this one.   (and as you know a young Lana Turner as well in the remake).

Yes, I think Ian would probably have a lot to say about the remake.

 

Personally, I don't think it comes close to matching its predecessor...even Spencer Tracy himself questioned the logic in remaking it.

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Funny I was going to ask the same question related to the Tracy-Bergman version.   Both are high quality "A" production versions so I would be interested in what Ian has to say about this one.   (and as you know a young Lana Turner as well in the remake).

I read that the Spencer Tracy one was not as well received as the 1931 version. However, I must say that I am curious to watch it just because I love the Dr. Jekyll store so much. I'm not a huge fan of Spencer Tracy but I could give it a whirl! 

 

Here is the transformation scene by March...such an amazing moment in horror history! 

 

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I also agree that I think Mr. Fredric March's version was absolutely great.  This movie was first made as a silent picture starring Mr. John Barrymore, with respect & not taking anything away from the original, I must say that I did enjoy Mr. March's version the most.  These days silent pictures are only seen on TCM and I'm happy about that!  I watched a Lillian Gish movie early this a.m. & caught part of a John Gilbert one as well.  I know many people who will not sit through a silent film!  They don't know what they are missing.  Those films are the first of all films and they are classics.  They will never loose their appeal, charm, inspiration and the many wonderful memories received from Fantastic performers as Charles Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Norma Shearer, Lon Chaney, Lillian Gish and Rudolph Valentino to name a few!  sorry for going "off" track ;)

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I also agree that I think Mr. Fredric March's version was absolutely great.  This movie was first made as a silent picture starring Mr. John Barrymore, with respect & not taking anything away from the original, I must say that I did enjoy Mr. March's version the most.  These days silent pictures are only seen on TCM and I'm happy about that!  I watched a Lillian Gish movie early this a.m. & caught part of a John Gilbert one as well.  I know many people who will not sit through a silent film!  They don't know what they are missing.  Those films are the first of all films and they are classics.  They will never loose their appeal, charm, inspiration and the many wonderful memories received from Fantastic performers as Charles Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Norma Shearer, Lon Chaney, Lillian Gish and Rudolph Valentino to name a few!  sorry for going "off" track ;)

You aren't going off track at all! Everything is relevant here! I hope you enjoyed my review of the movie. I mentioned that John Barrymore was originally asked to be in the 1931 film, but due to contract issues, he was unable to be Dr. Jekyll. I love silent movies...it just takes a certain mood for me to watch them. I watch "Nosferatu" about once a year! Maybe I will do a review on it at some point. I love watching the old Chaplin and Keaton movies. Harold Lloyd is another one I really like. 

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Ian--for "silents" recommendations (others will have different ones, I'm sure)

 

"The Phantom of the Opera"--(1925)--Lon Chaney Sr. stars.

 

"The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari--(1919)--Classic of German Expressionism (in other words, the granddaddy of horror film techniques--was shown on TCM this past Sept.--if you get a chance,see it.

 

"The Unknown"--(1927)--Lon Chaney Sr. & a young Joan Crawford.

 

"The Lodger"--(1926)--My favorite director, Alfred Hitchcock: his first major film.

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I read that the Spencer Tracy one was not as well received as the 1931 version. 

By the way, the Spencer Tracy version from 1941 is airing soon on TCM. Check it out on Friday October 23, 2015 as part of a theme on Literary Horror.

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