Bug's Sidekick

WHAT IS A CLASSIC MOVIE

118 posts in this topic

After reading more comments,I realize that the question I wanted to be answered is why we are seeing 70's,80's and even 90's movies on a channel with classic in its name? My idea of classic was old or even older than me. I hope this thing of showing newer movies doesn't become a trend. We can watch them else where. Give me a Boston **** any day instead of even an Oscar winner from the 70's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AndreaDoria said: Since those phrases came from my post (snipped)

and:

Since you're so glad that I don't have any say in what TCM shows, then I would be interested in where you're going to find your majority to make the decisions.

 
Whoa, nellie! I'm not "glad" you don't decide TCMs schedule, I only quoted your first line (the "I think" and "MY choices" are repeated from several others' posts) to illustrate most posts defining "classic" are simply personal opinion.
 
I was not singling you out. Many share your opinion.
 
While I did not directly "lift" the description of "classic" from a dictionary, as an editor, I must be aware of precise definitions. While everyone is entitled to their personal opinion of what "classic" means for film, it's the collective majority who actually decides whether something is truly "classic".
 

They don't seem to understand that 1990s films DO NOT MIX well with 1930s and 40s films

 

TCM Programmers are just doing their job the best they can with what they are given. They have a budget, and rent film "packages" that dictate what can be shown, and sometimes even WHEN and how often they are shown. 

They can use their professional judgement, but rarely personal opinion.

 

When any other cable TV station disappoints it's viewers with say, overly violent shows or insipid reality shows, the viewers simply stop watching.

Why do classic movie viewers become so outraged with this station's content? 

And worse, why do the viewers complain?

 

2767638386_d8efc6fb1f.jpg

 

 

Bogie said- even in Canada.

smiley-whacky057.gif

You make it sound like you live in igloos.

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

You make it sound like you live in igloos.

 

 

 

 

 

I lived in an igloo until I was 14 and had to beat wolves off with a stick on the way to school.

And that was in downtown Toronto.

But try telling that to the kids of today and they won't believe you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the dictionary definitions agree that classic refers to

a work of high quality that endures over the years. So each

person will have their own opinion of which works are of high

quality. Endurance seems to be more a matter of math. I also

prefer to use the term studio era. That separates quality from

a specific time frame. Let's face it, the studio era certainly

produced its share of clunkers, just as the post studio era

does.The same goes for films of high quality.

But TCM has never restricted itself to works of high quality. They've always showed junk from the '30s and '40s along with the good films.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But TCM has never restricted itself to works of high quality. They've always showed junk from the '30s and '40s along with the good films.

I think he knows that and back we go to Jamesjazzguitar's astute observation that 'Classic' in TCM is merely a marketing tool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think he knows that and back we go to Jamesjazzguitar's astute observation that 'Classic' in TCM is merely a marketing tool.

They could have called themselves Turner Old Movies with the acronym TOM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those two components, the high quality of the work and its durability,

seem to be common to most of the definitions I've seen, both from

contemporary dictionaries and older ones. Maybe a new one will

be introduced in the future, but I'm just working with what is now

available. But indeed, what works are to be included in those two

components is still subjective.

 

When it comes to movies. to me classic is a description of quality,

not the year in which the movie came out.

But even quality can be viewed in subjective terms. We cannot assume that because something won an Oscar, it was quality when that victory may have been more of a political thing. 

 

I do want to point out that I never equated 'old' with 'classic.' Not sure if other posters have done that, but I know I have never said that (at least I don't remember saying that, because it's not exactly how I think). However, for me (and again, note this is my criteria and I am not imposing it on others) I choose to focus on the years 1930 to 1960, not because these are 'old films' per se, but because I am interested in that time period from a historical point of view and in terms of the technological advances that were sweeping through the motion picture industry.

 

To borrow Tom Brokaw's expression, I am most interested in the 'greatest generation' and how their story is reflected directly and indirectly in films from 1930 to 1960. I continually find new things in these films that give me insights into my four grandparents. Notice I said 'new things' not 'old things.' If others see classic film in a different way, that's fine...but this is how I define it and I don't see myself redefining my stance, nor should I. That would be like asking me to have a less personal attachment to film from these decades, and sorry but I am unable to do that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only hope that someone will pick up what TCM used to do and play the old movies. It is really a let down to tune in and find "Being There" or "Sleepless in Seattle" playing. Not that these are poor films. They are actually really good and could be considered "classics". Those newer films is not why I subscribe or watch TCM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only hope that someone will pick up what TCM used to do and play the old movies. It is really a let down to tune in and find "Being There" or "Sleepless in Seattle" playing. Not that these are poor films. They are actually really good and could be considered "classics". Those newer films is not why I subscribe or watch TCM.

 

The vast majority of movies TCM shows are pre-1960 movies.   TCM shows a few recently released movies and that prompts you to say 'what TCM used to do and play the old movies'?       

 

So you're not going to watch the 'old movies' that TCM does show and will continue to show because they showed some non 'old movies'?    

 

Sorry, I'm not getting the logic here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only hope that someone will pick up what TCM used to do and play the old movies. It is really a let down to tune in and find "Being There" or "Sleepless in Seattle" playing. Not that these are poor films. They are actually really good and could be considered "classics". Those newer films is not why I subscribe or watch TCM.

 

Would someone here please supply Bugsy here with the actual direct text of what a 21 years younger Bob Osborne said on day one of TCM's existence back in '94?!

 

(...'cause evidently there continues to be some widespread misunderstanding and confusion as to this channel's original "business model" was and is supposed to be)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only hope that someone will pick up what TCM used to do and play the old movies. It is really a let down to tune in and find "Being There" or "Sleepless in Seattle" playing. Not that these are poor films. They are actually really good and could be considered "classics". Those newer films is not why I subscribe or watch TCM.

So where else could you see BEING THERE, commercial free, other than TCM?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need to get mean over this. I am sure that I am less informed and don't know all of ins and outs of TCM. And I found out I don't have a clue what Classic means. In a bit plainer English , what I am trying to say is I only wish they would stick to playing movies over 50 years old. I never mentioned a word about not tuning into TCM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need to get mean over this. I am sure that I am less informed and don't know all of ins and outs of TCM. And I found out I don't have a clue what Classic means. In a bit plainer English , what I am trying to say is I only wish they would stick to playing movies over 50 years old. I never mentioned a word about not tuning into TCM.

It seems that most of the movies TCM plays during the day, Monday thru Friday, ARE over 50 years old.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems that most of the movies TCM plays during the day, Monday thru Friday, ARE over 50 years old.

 

Good point, DGF. And thus adhering to at least one of those aforementioned Bob Osborne stated TCM directives made 21 years ago.

 

And, lets not forget all those low-budget programmer serials they show on Saturday mornings and afternoons for all those of a certain age who can then relive their youth of going to an all-day Saturday matinee for the price of two bits.

 

(...popcorn not included, of course)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems that most of the movies TCM plays during the day, Monday thru Friday, ARE over 50 years old.

Many of the people who can watch movies during the day, during the week, are retired, and are older than the average TCM viewer. TCM assumes older viewers want to watch older movies, and younger viewers want to watch more recent movies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many of the people who can watch movies during the day, during the week, are retired, and are older than the average TCM viewer. TCM assumes older viewers want to watch older movies, and younger viewers want to watch more recent movies.

Do you really think that's what is going on with their programming? Interesting theory but I am not sure if it can fully be applied...because often the evening featuring Robert Osborne's picks, which occurs each month, does not show anything newer than 1960. In fact MAKE MINE MINK, a 1960 release, is the 'newest' film I have ever seen him introduce as one of his picks. And I think most of his Essentials choices are pre-1960...it is the guest cohost (Rose McGowan, Alec Baldwin, Drew Barrymore, and Sally Field) who typically selects more recent movies. 

 

Plus we have plenty of evenings when the Star of the Month (four nights per month) programming means that TCM is showing a lot of films from 1930 to 1960. If we look at the Norma Shearer retrospective in November, her last motion picture was made in 1942. So there will be no post-war films shown on any of those four nights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what is a classic movie? a lot of what tcm has utterly failed to procure and show.

 

here are three...

 

1. the flame barrier (1958)

 

2. Dracula (1958) 2012 BFI Restoration

 

3. Hot Spell (1958)

 

all three are classic films unknown to tcm programmers for some undefinable reason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what is a classic movie? a lot of what tcm has utterly failed to procure and show.

 

here are three...

 

1. the flame barrier (1958)

 

2. Dracula (1958) 2012 BFI Restoration

 

3. Hot Spell (1958)

 

all three are classic films unknown to tcm programmers for some undefinable reason.

and it wouldn't surprise me if ileanna douglas has not viewed any of these three films even once!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you really think that's what is going on with their programming? Interesting theory but I am not sure if it can fully be applied...because often the evening featuring Robert Osborne's picks, which occurs each month, does not show anything newer than 1960. In fact MAKE MINE MINK, a 1960 release, is the 'newest' film I have ever seen him introduce as one of his picks. And I think most of his Essentials choices are pre-1960...it is the guest cohost (Rose McGowan, Alec Baldwin, Drew Barrymore, and Sally Field) who typically selects more recent movies. 

 

Plus we have plenty of evenings when the Star of the Month (four nights per month) programming means that TCM is showing a lot of films from 1930 to 1960. If we look at the Norma Shearer retrospective in November, her last motion picture was made in 1942. So there will be no post-war films shown on any of those four nights.

But obviously, they are not going to have Bob's Picks,  the Essentials, and other high profile programming, during the day. That's going to occur in the evening, when more people of ALL ages are watching.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what is a classic movie? a lot of what tcm has utterly failed to procure and show.

 

here are three...

 

1. the flame barrier (1958)

 

2. Dracula (1958) 2012 BFI Restoration

 

3. Hot Spell (1958)

 

all three are classic films unknown to tcm programmers for some undefinable reason.

hollywood family connections are no substitute for real world familiarities meaning genuine old school living room TV space cadetism. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

...Plus we have plenty of evenings when the Star of the Month (four nights per month) means they are showing a lot of films from 1930 to 1960. If we look at the Norma Shearer month in November, her last motion picture was made in 1942. So there will be no post-war films shown on any of those four nights.

 

Well then, and so to paraphrase the last line in MISTER ROBERTS delivered by the great Jack Lemmon...

 

"Now, what's all this crud about 'no classic movies being shown on TCM', again?!"

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need to get mean over this. I am sure that I am less informed and don't know all of ins and outs of TCM. And I found out I don't have a clue what Classic means. In a bit plainer English , what I am trying to say is I only wish they would stick to playing movies over 50 years old. I never mentioned a word about not tuning into TCM.

Again, it bears repeating. THEY HAVE ALWAYS SHOWN FILMS MADE AFTER 1960.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I assume in the next few weeks tcm will be breaking out some of their holloween coffer-accessed films like horror of dracula, their inferior americanized cut of hammer's dracula from 1958 without the full count dracula sunlight disintegration.

 

great cinemaphiles huh? if svengoolie could get the BFI restored cut I bet he'd show it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well then, and so to paraphrase the last line in MISTER ROBERTS delivered by the great Jack Lemmon...

 

"Now, what's all this crud about no classic movies being shown on TCM, again?!"

Yes...I think TCM's programming is actually quite balanced. For me personally, I am focusing on the earlier decades. If they have an occasional evening where we see films from the 1990s, I am not going to get too upset about it-- I just know I probably won't be watching a lot of it. 

 

The Essentials series, though, is a perfect example of mixing older and newer classics. Pairing Osborne with a younger cohost who might have different preferences (from more recent decades) is a brilliant programming strategy, because it makes the series overall more wide-ranging. The real issue with Essentials, though is not the age of the films selected but the fact that precious few of them come from outside libraries like NBC Universal and Paramount/Republic and often do not show great enough variety in terms of genres covered. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us