Superx

50s-70s romance movies?

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any romance comedy classic movies between 50s to late 70s .. I mean the groovy era of technicolor movies of 60s and 70s, please don't write musicals.

for me:(not ordered)
the long long trailer (1953)
Pillow Talk (1959)
splendor in the grass (1961)
Breakfast at Tiffany's(1961)

All in a Nights Work (1961)
Sunday in New York (1963)

Move Over, Darling (1963)

Man's Favorite Sport? (1964)

Modesty Blaise (1966)
Bonnie and Clyde (1967)
A Guide for the Married Man (1967)

Fathom (1967)

Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (1969)
Lovers and Other Strangers(1970)

 

 

 

what is your list?

 

Thanks.

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Some which I enjoy:

 

How to Marry a Millionaire (1953)

 

Sabrina (1954)

 

Pillow Talk (1959)

 

The Parent Trap (1961)

 

Sunday in New York (1963)

 

Come Fly With Me (1963)

 

Man's Favorite Sport? (1964)

 

Never Too Late (1965)

 

Who's Minding the Mint? (1967)

 

A Guide for the Married Man (1967)

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Breakfast at Tiffany's

The Goodbye Girl

The Parent Trap

Pillow Talk

Sabrina

Send Me No Flowers

Yours, Mine and Ours

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​Lovers and Other Strangers

​Annie Hall

Barefoot in the Park

​The Apartment

A New Leaf

​That Touch of Mink

​Tall Story

The Owl and the Pussycat

​Seems Like Old Times

Where the Boys Are

​Goodbye Columbus

Fatso

Any Wednesday

​What's Up Doc?

Walk Don't Run

​Minnie and Moskowitz

Sheila Levine is Dead and Living in New York

​Cactus Flower

Butterflies are Free

​Same Time Next Year

​Play it Again, Sam

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​Lovers and Other Strangers

​Annie Hall

Barefoot in the Park

​The Apartment

A New Leaf

​That Touch of Mink

​Tall Story

The Owl and the Pussycat

​Seems Like Old Times

Where the Boys Are

​Goodbye Columbus

Fatso

Any Wednesday

​What's Up Doc?

Walk Don't Run

​Minnie and Moskowitz

Sheila Levine is Dead and Living in New York

​Cactus Flower

Butterflies are Free

​Same Time Next Year

​Play it Again, Sam

 

I see a few on your list which I forgot to mention.

 

I see others on your list which I'm hoping to see some day.  :)

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From the 1950's, I love Indiscreet, directed by Stanley Donen. Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman aren't exactly young lovers but they're smart and chic, with expert comic timing. Age makes their romance all the more compelling. For the same reasons, I also love Vincente Minnelli's The Reluctant Debutante, with Rex Harrison and Kay Kendall as the older romantic pairing and a newly-minted Sandra Dee and a very appealing John Saxon for the younger audience. Both Harrison and Kendall were seasoned stage actors and, again, their comic timing is perfection. Another very smart romantic comedy from the 50's is The Swan, with Grace Kelly and Louis Jourdan as the star-crossed would-be lovers, as well as a surprisingly romantic Alec Guinness as her destined mate. All three films have obvious roots on the stage and may be off-putting for some for that reason, but I love all three.

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34 minutes ago, DougieB said:

From the 1950's, I love Indiscreet, directed by Stanley Donen. Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman aren't exactly young lovers but they're smart and chic, with expert comic timing. Age makes their romance all the more compelling. For the same reasons, I also love Vincente Minnelli's The Reluctant Debutante, with Rex Harrison and Kay Kendall as the older romantic pairing and a newly-minted Sandra Dee and a very appealing John Saxon for the younger audience. Both Harrison and Kendall were seasoned stage actors and, again, their comic timing is perfection. Another very smart romantic comedy from the 50's is The Swan, with Grace Kelly and Louis Jourdan as the star-crossed would-be lovers, as well as a surprisingly romantic Alec Guinness as her destined mate. All three films have obvious roots on the stage and may be off-putting for some for that reason, but I love all three.

I loved INDISCREET the first time I saw it about fifteen years ago (checked out on VHS from a public library). Then when TCM finally aired the movie about two or three years ago, I was disappointed by its slow pace and labored love story. Not at all what I remembered from the first viewing. 

Recently I found it on YouTube and re-watched the thing, just to give it one more chance. And strangely, I loved it again. I don't think I've ever gone from liking to disliking to liking a classic the way I have with INDISCREET. It's the same movie, it didn't change, but somehow my perspective did each time. I'm afraid to look at it a fourth time. LOL

It definitely is a slow movie, very leisurely paced, and as you indicated, its stage play roots are quite in evidence. But if the viewer is not in a hurry and just wants two captivating middle-aged stars to do their stuff and be charmed by them, then it works. Bergman's performance truly is flawless. I can't heap generous praise on Grant, as I think he's too fearful of being upstaged by her in some of their scenes (and there's a weird competitive energy that comes across from him)-- he certainly knows she's the better stage-trained performer. 

Donen's direction is equally flawless. And the set design is extraordinary. I also enjoyed the supporting performances by Phyllis Calvert and Cecil Parker.  

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Shutoo mentioned The Owl and the Pussycat (1970) and that's got to be one of my all-time favorites. It's Barbra before the "grande dame" overlay got between her and her audience. She and George Segal work wonders with the Buck Henry script, taking the old introvert/extrovert dynamic to a whole new level. There's a brilliant scene where Segal helps insomniac Streisand go to sleep by doing a whole late-night-tv sign off (of which there is no such thing today) through a fish tank. It's the classic situation where two people irritate each other no end until they begin to see themselves through the other's eyes and start to change accordingly. It's adult and witty and a great "modern" romantic comedy.

P.S. One thing I've noticed is that the movie seems to exist only in a slightly edited form these days. It was one of the first instances of a major star (Streisand) dropping the F bomb, but a few crucial seconds have been edited out for the DVD and broadcast. The movie suffers because without it the overreaction of the hecklers doesn't make sense and it's not clear why they would be chasing her. There was also a brief shot of her (or someone's..a double?) breasts as reflected in a mirror when Segal and Streisand are in the tub....also gone bye-bye. I wonder if the aforementioned "grande dame" side got the best of her and she had some history rewritten here...or maybe Columbia got cold feet instead of having to put one of those language and nudity advisories on the DVD?

Edited by DougieB
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Shutoo also mentioned "Butterflies Are Free", God bless him or her.

Its' stage roots are quite visible - I did see it on Broadway.

But it is such an effective - and unrecognized - romantic classic, I think.

Perhaps the fact that the boy is blind has somehow invalidated its' obvous appeal.

That is, turning it into a rather strange love story.

In the original, Keir Dullea and Blythe Danner made Broadway history.

But Edward Albert and Goldie Hawn are flawless in the movie.

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55 minutes ago, rayban said:

Shutoo also mentioned "Butterflies Are Free", God bless him or her.

Its' stage roots are quite visible - I did see it on Broadway.

But it is such an effective - and unrecognized - romantic classic, I think.

Perhaps the fact that the boy is blind has somehow invalidated its' obvous appeal.

That is, turning it into a rather strange love story.

In the original, Keir Dullea and Blythe Danner made Broadway history.

But Edward Albert and Goldie Hawn are flawless in the movie.

Albert and Hawn are indeed flawless but classic movie actress Eileen Heckart is also.

Big fan of this movie.   Yea, it is a 'rather strange love story' but that is one of the reasons I like it so much.

 

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1 hour ago, rayban said:

Shutoo also mentioned "Butterflies Are Free", God bless him or her.

Its' stage roots are quite visible - I did see it on Broadway.

But it is such an effective - and unrecognized - romantic classic, I think.

Perhaps the fact that the boy is blind has somehow invalidated its' obvous appeal.

That is, turning it into a rather strange love story.

In the original, Keir Dullea and Blythe Danner made Broadway history.

But Edward Albert and Goldie Hawn are flawless in the movie.

Screen Shot 2018-02-22 at 11.31.43 AM.png

You know how much I love Keir Dullea...so I'm very jealous you saw him doing this play on Broadway!

Screen Shot 2018-02-22 at 11.35.12 AM.jpg

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