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NickAndNora34

Weird/creepy/psychological

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I think, for me, I thoroughly enjoyed The Bad Seed (1956), What Ever Happened to Baby Jane (1962) and The Thing from Another World (1951; despite its corniness; "Keep watching the skies!") What are some y'all have seen that you thought were weird/strange, scary/creepy, or just things that made you think?

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You mean, what I call "disturbing" films?

There are at least a couple from the 50s, smarter than average sci-fi/horror flicks: The Incredible Shrinking Man  and The Fly. Both of them made me feel kind of awful, watching them, but they also maintained my interest.

 

I agree about The Bad Seed. Any film with an evil child is creepy and disturbing.

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"Island of Lost Souls" (1933)--Based on H. G. Wells' "The Island of Dr. Moreau", film was banned in England when first released.

 

"Dead of Night" (1946)--British horror anthology film--5 stories--Michael Redgrave, Googie Withers, & teenaged Sally Ann Howes make the biggest impact--ending must have packed a wallop when first released.

 

"The Wicker Man" (1973)(TWM 73)--Not the 2006 remake!--TWM 73 works splendidly because director & star knew horror cliches & did the cliches opposite, plus the viewer sees the opportunities for escape vanish 1 by 1.

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The Green Room (1978) is one. An oddly compelling and effective film. Francoise Truffaut is excellent playing one of the most bizarre, surreally realistic characters I ever recall having seen. He's creepy and acts very oddly, but is curiously sympathetic whilst being very alien. Now, I've only seen it once, and I don't speak French, so I'm not in the greatest judge- but I found it haunting.

 

(I was just watching He Who Gets Slapped (1924) last night.) Lon Chaney might be better at this than anyone. His films are so ridiculously strange that they sometimes verge on silliness. I've wondered if that effects their dramatic impact, but have come to think that it actually gives his films an edge. There's something I find liberating about how over-the-top his films are in every way- like they take place in a twisted parallel universe that the toned-down films of later years simply did not exist in. They are usually tragedies and melodramas, but they create a feeling horror that exceeds that of most more typical horror films, to me.

 

The Truffaut film I mentioned is not comparable, but it is one film that managed to create this feeling in me while also being very realistic. I'll have to watch it again some day to see if it's really as I remember it being...

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You mean, what I call "disturbing" films?

There are at least a couple from the 50s, smarter than average sci-fi/horror flicks: The Incredible Shrinking Man  and The Fly. Both of them made me feel kind of awful, watching them, but they also maintained my interest.

 

I agree about The Bad Seed. Any film with an evil child is creepy and disturbing.

THE BAD SEED, yes, despite the ridiculous cop-out ending (compare it with the play it's based on).

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"Island of Lost Souls" (1933)--Based on H. G. Wells' "The Island of Dr. Moreau", film was banned in England when first released.

 

"Dead of Night" (1946)--British horror anthology film--5 stories--Michael Redgrave, Googie Withers, & teenaged Sally Ann Howes make the biggest impact--ending must have packed a wallop when first released.

 

"The Wicker Man" (1973)(TWM 73)--Not the 2006 remake!--TWM 73 works splendidly because director & star knew horror cliches & did the cliches opposite, plus the viewer sees the opportunities for escape vanish 1 by 1.

The 1933 ISLAND OF LOST SOULS is truly horrifying; it's infinitely superior to the technicolor remake, which looks like a travelogue (and Burt Lancaster is miscast -- he's too normal). 

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It's hard to top FREAKS and THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS.

Oh yeah... Freaks "freaked me out" when I first saw it. My drama teacher showed it to us a while ago (I guess, because it was almost Halloween?) and I was slightly disturbed.

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