TopBilled

Golden age: Roll call

1,426 posts in this topic

"The Emperor Jones" is a most impressive film. 

 

It used to air on Retroplex. I'm surprised TCM doesn't show it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-05-04-at-6-16-35-am.png

 

An independent artist is someone who takes charge of their career, and Gloria Swanson certainly qualifies. She began at the age of 14 in her native Chicago, where she first appeared as an extra in short silent films. One of these pictures was a comedy with Charlie Chaplin. By the age of 16, she had dropped out of school and decided she would focus full-time on moviemaking.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-10-16-36-am.pn

 

Gloria and her mother eventually relocated to southern California where most of the film companies had gone. She began to get better roles, usually in short comedy films. In some of these early productions, she was performing her own stunts alongside her male costars. By the time Gloria turned twenty, she had signed a long-term contract with Paramount and started to make feature-length motion pictures.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-10-16-20-am.pn

 

During the 1920s Gloria became a bonafide movie star– not just in America, but internationally too. She worked frequently with directors Cecil B. DeMille and Sam Wood. She had one hit after another, and not only did audiences enjoy her unique acting on screen, they also were interested in her fashion sense. Soon people all around the world were copying Gloria’s clothes and talking about her sensational personal life.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-10-17-04-am.pn

 

She was linked to various leading men; but interestingly, she married Wallace Beery whose own film career was eclipsed by Gloria’s, at least in those days.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-10-15-33-am.pn

 

In the late 20s Gloria left Paramount and joined United Artists. Like her old friend Chaplin, she wanted to be in charge of the movies she made. Some of Gloria’s early sound films did not do too well; however, she still continued to take starring roles on screen until the mid-30s. After this time, she left the movies and focused on theater and her personal life. She was lured back to the screen in 1941 by RKO for a romantic comedy with Adolphe Menjou, but it did not lead to a major comeback. That wouldn’t occur until a decade later when Gloria took the part of Norma Desmond in Billy Wilder’s classic noir SUNSET BOULEVARD. She was able to poke fun at her silent film days and reunite with DeMille.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-10-13-36-am.pn

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. why change your wife? (1920); paramount; comedy; bebe daniels; 90 mins.
  2. the affairs of anatol (1921); paramount; comedy drama; wallace reid; 117 mins.
  3. beyond the rocks (1922); paramount; romance; rudolph valentino; 80 mins.
  4. zaza (1923); paramount; drama; h.b. warner; 66 mins.
  5. stage struck (1925); paramount; comedy; lawrence gray; 87 mins.
  6. the love of sunya (1927); ua; drama; john boles; 78 mins.
  7. sadie thompson (1928); ua; drama; lionel barrymore; 91 mins.
  8. the trespasser (1929); ua; drama; robert ames; 90 mins.
  9. perfect understanding (1933); ua; comedy; laurence olivier; 80 mins.
  10. sunset boulevard (1950); paramount; crime; william holden; 110 mins.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-05-04-at-6-16-35-am.png

 

An independent artist is someone who takes charge of their career, and Gloria Swanson certainly qualifies. She began at the age of 14 in her native Chicago, where she first appeared as an extra in short silent films. One of these pictures was a comedy with Charlie Chaplin. By the age of 16, she had dropped out of school and decided she would focus full-time on moviemaking.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-10-16-36-am.pn

 

Gloria and her mother eventually relocated to southern California where most of the film companies had gone. She began to get better roles, usually in short comedy films. In some of these early productions, she was performing her own stunts alongside her male costars. By the time Gloria turned twenty, she had signed a long-term contract with Paramount and started to make feature-length motion pictures.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-10-16-20-am.pn

 

During the 1920s Gloria became a bonafide movie star– not just in America, but internationally too. She worked frequently with directors Cecil B. DeMille and Sam Wood. She had one hit after another, and not only did audiences enjoy her unique acting on screen, they also were interested in her fashion sense. Soon people all around the world were copying Gloria’s clothes and talking about her sensational personal life.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-10-17-04-am.pn

 

She was linked to various leading men; but interestingly, she married Wallace Beery whose own film career was eclipsed by Gloria’s, at least in those days.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-10-15-33-am.pn

 

In the late 20s Gloria left Paramount and joined United Artists. Like her old friend Chaplin, she wanted to be in charge of the movies she made. Some of Gloria’s early sound films did not do too well; however, she still continued to take starring roles on screen until the mid-30s. After this time, she left the movies and focused on theater and her personal life. She was lured back to the screen in 1941 by RKO for a romantic comedy with Adolphe Menjou, but it did not lead to a major comeback. That wouldn’t occur until a decade later when Gloria took the part of Norma Desmond in Billy Wilder’s classic noir SUNSET BOULEVARD. She was able to poke fun at her silent film days and reunite with DeMille.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-10-13-36-am.pn

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. why change your wife? (1920); paramount; comedy; bebe daniels; 90 mins.
  2. the affairs of anatol (1921); paramount; comedy drama; wallace reid; 117 mins.
  3. beyond the rocks (1922); paramount; romance; rudolph valentino; 80 mins.
  4. zaza (1923); paramount; drama; h.b. warner; 66 mins.
  5. stage struck (1925); paramount; comedy; lawrence gray; 87 mins.
  6. the love of sunya (1927); ua; drama; john boles; 78 mins.
  7. sadie thompson (1928); ua; drama; lionel barrymore; 91 mins.
  8. the trespasser (1929); ua; drama; robert ames; 90 mins.
  9. perfect understanding (1933); ua; comedy; laurence olivier; 80 mins.
  10. sunset boulevard (1950); paramount; crime; william holden; 110 mins.

 

Her performance in "Sunset Boulevard" is one of the screen's greatest performances.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Her performance in "Sunset Boulevard" is one of the screen's greatest performances.

 

Yes, indeed. I don't think Mae West (Wilder's original choice) would have been as good.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Avery Brooks playing Paul Robeson?  This I want to see.  I can't imagine anyone else doing it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Avery Brooks playing Paul Robeson?  This I want to see.  I can't imagine anyone else doing it.

 

He performed it on stage in the 90s on Broadway. There's been a revival and he could always do it again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-05-05-at-5-58-27-am.png

 

Some stars are a bit more eclectic than others. Anthony Quinn’s independent spirit propelled him in more than one direction. As a young man, he thought about becoming a preacher and took up religion. But then he changed his mind and took up boxing. After boxing, he studied architecture; and during that particular apprenticeship, he underwent surgery and needed speech therapy. So he enrolled in an acting class to help with vocal exercises and decided to pursue acting full time.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-05-at-6-00-58-am.png

 

Later when he had become a well-known actor, he dabbled in painting. One of his Oscars was for a biopic based on Van Gogh (LUST FOR LIFE); so it seemed to follow that Tony would try to follow his dreams in this area, too. He was called a genius by many who knew him, and there didn’t seem to be anything he wouldn’t try, if it appealed to his creative instincts.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-05-at-6-00-38-am.png

 

Tony’s Hollywood career had its ups and downs. He began appearing in films at Paramount in the late 30s. Some of these early productions were directed by Cecil B. DeMille, and Tony soon married DeMille’s daughter. The two men didn’t always get along. At the end of DeMille’s career, when the director’s health was failing, he let Tony take over the remake of THE BUCCANEER. But it was a long road to that point.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-05-at-6-02-00-am1.pn

 

In the 40s Tony worked at a variety of studios, usually playing ethnic characters. During these years he was stuck in supporting roles. He did not achieve his breakthrough until after he had gone to Broadway and successfully taken over Brando’s role in ‘A Streetcar Named Desire.’ He and Brando collaborated on screen, in 20th Century Fox’s VIVA ZAPATA!, for which Tony earned his first Oscar. In the mid-50s and 60s, Tony’s movie career was red hot. He was making hit films in Hollywood and hit films in Europe. He had the chance to appear alongside an incredible array of performers, usually with many of the world’s top directors behind the camera.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-05-at-2-01-53-pm.png

 

There were more Oscar nominations and even several returns to Broadway. He also was praised for his later roles on television. It was a career that kept going, because Tony’s restless creative spirit meant he had to continue looking for new challenges– new ways to express himself. He never disappointed his fans.

 

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the buccaneer (1938); paramount; adventure; fredric march; 126 mins.
  2. union pacific (1939); paramount; western; barbara stanwyck; 135 mins.
  3. city for conquest (1940); warners; crime; james cagney; 104 mins.
  4. larceny, inc. (1942); warners; crime; edward g. robinson; 95 mins.
  5. china sky (1945); rko; drama; randolph scott; 78 mins.
  6. back to bataan (1945); rko; war; john wayne; 95 mins.
  7. the brave bulls (1951); columbia; drama; mel ferrer; 106 mins.
  8. viva zapata! (1952); fox; drama; marlon brando; 113 mins.
  9. blowing wild (1953); warners; drama; barbara stanwyck; 92 mins.
  10. la strada (1954); italian; drama; giulietta masina; 104 mins.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-05-05-at-5-58-27-am.png

 

Some stars are a bit more eclectic than others. Anthony Quinn’s independent spirit propelled him in more than one direction. As a young man, he thought about becoming a preacher and took up religion. But then he changed his mind and took up boxing. After boxing, he studied architecture; and during that particular apprenticeship, he underwent surgery and needed speech therapy. So he enrolled in an acting class to help with vocal exercises and decided to pursue acting full time.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-05-at-6-00-58-am.png

 

Later when he had become a well-known actor, he dabbled in painting. One of his Oscars was for a biopic based on Van Gogh (LUST FOR LIFE); so it seemed to follow that Tony would try to follow his dreams in this area, too. He was called a genius by many who knew him, and there didn’t seem to be anything he wouldn’t try, if it appealed to his creative instincts.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-05-at-6-00-38-am.png

 

Tony’s Hollywood career had its ups and downs. He began appearing in films at Paramount in the late 30s. Some of these early productions were directed by Cecil B. DeMille, and Tony soon married DeMille’s daughter. The two men didn’t always get along. At the end of DeMille’s career, when the director’s health was failing, he let Tony take over the remake of THE BUCCANEER. But it was a long road to that point.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-05-at-6-02-00-am.png

 

In the 40s Tony worked at a variety of studios, usually playing ethnic characters. During these years he was stuck in supporting roles. He did not achieve his breakthrough until after he had gone to Broadway and successfully taken over Brando’s role in ‘A Streetcar Named Desire.’ He and Brando collaborated on screen, in 20th Century Fox’s VIVA ZAPATA!, for which Tony earned his first Oscar. In the mid-50s and 60s, Tony’s movie career was red hot. He was making hit films in Hollywood and hit films in Europe. He had the chance to appear alongside an incredible array of performers, usually with many of the world’s top directors behind the camera.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-05-at-6-01-33-am.png

 

There were more Oscar nominations and even several returns to Broadway. He also was praised for his later roles on television. It was a career that kept going, because Tony’s restless creative spirit meant he had to continue looking for new challenges– new ways to express himself. He never disappointed his fans.

 

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the buccaneer (1938); paramount; adventure; fredric march; 126 mins.
  2. union pacific (1939); paramount; western; barbara stanwyck; 135 mins.
  3. city for conquest (1940); warners; crime; james cagney; 104 mins.
  4. larceny, inc. (1942); warners; crime; edward g. robinson; 95 mins.
  5. china sky (1945); rko; drama; randolph scott; 78 mins.
  6. back to bataan (1945); rko; war; john wayne; 95 mins.
  7. the brave bulls (1951); columbia; drama; mel ferrer; 106 mins.
  8. viva zapata! (1952); fox; drama; marlon brando; 113 mins.
  9. blowing wild (1953); warners; drama; barbara stanwyck; 92 mins.
  10. la strada (1954); italian; drama; giulietta masina; 104 mins.

 

"La Strada" must have been his crowning achievement.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"La Strada" must have been his crowning achievement.

 

Probably. One film of his I like a lot is a European picture he made with Ingrid Bergman called THE VISIT. I also enjoy their second pairing, an American production called A WALK IN THE SPRING RAIN. I just feel their styles complement each other very well.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-10-26-04-am.pn

 

Gypsy Rose Lee was named after her mother Rose, but her middle name was Louise. So when she started making films she was billed as Louise Hovick. Hovick was her family name, and younger sister June who was also a performer, used a modified version and called herself June Havoc. At first June was the breadwinner in the family.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-10-29-50-am.pn

 

At a very young age June led the sisters’ act in vaudeville, as a dancer and singer. June was the first one to get a movie deal; and she and their mother went to Hollywood, leaving Louise behind. When June was old enough she ran off and got married and started dancing with her new husband. This left the mother and Louise to fend for themselves. Unfortunately, without June, Louise didn’t have much of an act– until Mama Rose realized Louise could make money as a striptease artist.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-10-29-11-am.pn

 

The new act was a sensation, and it focused on teasing more than actual nudity. Louise also incorporated comedy into her burlesque routines, which helped entertain audiences and made her more popular. She would be arrested several times for her revue, but it only made her more famous. When Fox offered her a contract in the late 30s, she was billed as Louise Hovick, though fans of her live shows knew her as Gypsy Rose Lee. In most of her Fox films she was assigned supporting roles. These tended to be Alice Faye musicals or Sonja Henie musicals; though there was one lead role for Louise in a comedy with Brian Donlevy.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-10-28-10-am.pn

 

After her contract with Fox ended, she returned to New York. She recreated her stage act in theaters, and also brought it to the screen in the wartime musical STAGE DOOR CANTEEN. Around this time she also had a child, fathered by director Otto Preminger. In 1944 she had another lead role in a western musical with Randolph Scott though it hardly made her a movie star. She took occasional roles on television in the 50s, and there were some more movie roles in low budget productions. But her claim to fame was her burlesque show which she wrote about in her memoir, which became the basis for a Broadway musical and a feature film adaptation in the early 1960s.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-10-28-44-am.pn

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. you can’t have everything (1937); fox; musical; alice faye; 100 mins.
  2. sally, irene and mary (1938); fox; comedy; alice faye; 86 mins.
  3. battle of broadway (1938); fox; comedy; victor mclaglen; 84 mins.
  4. my lucky star (1938); fox; musical comedy; sonja henie; 90 mins.
  5. stage door canteen (1943); ua; musical; katharine hepburn; 132 mins.
  6. belle of the yukon (1944); rko; western musical; randolph scott; 83 mins.
  7. babes in bagdad (1952); ua; comedy; paulette goddard; 95 mins.
  8. screaming mimi (1958); columbia; crime; phil carey; 79 mins.
  9. wind across the everglades (1958); warners; drama; christopher plummer; 93 mins.
  10. the stripper (1963); fox; drama; joanne woodward; 95 mins.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gypsy Rose Lee doesn't have a very big part in Screaming Mimi (1958) but there is some fine musical scenes in the film.    The jazz guitar style featured is the type I'm really into and works well as back-up to the dancing by Anita Ekberg.

 

    

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gypsy Rose Lee doesn't have a very big part in Screaming Mimi (1958) but there is some fine musical scenes in the film.    The jazz guitar style featured is the type I'm really into and works well as back-up to the dancing by Anita Ekberg.

 

Thanks for the comment, James. It's been a few years since I've seen SCREAMING MIMI. I think I watched it as a Netflix rental when it was first issued on disc. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gypsy Rose Lee has a small part in "The Stripper", too, which has a dazzling performance from Joanne Woodward and a very fine performance from Richard Beymer.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-11-43-59-pm1.p

 

Burt Lancaster was a unique movie star. When he was hired to make his first picture, he deliberately chose not to sign with a studio. Instead his contract was with his agent, Harold Hecht, who would sell his services to studios that might be interested in using Burt. In the postwar years, this usually meant producer Hal Wallis at Paramount, or producer Mark Hellenger at Universal– men who were just as independent and found a kindred spirit in Burt.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-11-37-16-pm.pn

 

Burt also had a clause in his deal with Hecht, that after five years he would be allowed to start producing his own films. That was practically unheard of at the time. But Burt was focused on the future and was thinking big. Actually, he didn’t have to wait five years. Within a year, he and Hecht co-produced the noir KISS THE BLOOD OFF MY HANDS, in which Burt played the lead role. Other co-productions soon followed. Several of these were swashbucklers at Warners, and they were hits.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-11-36-29-pm.pn

 

Burt and Harold Hecht formed their own company, which expanded to include writer James Hill. For most of the 50s and into the early 60s, they were unstoppable as a team. Most of their pictures were successful with audiences. While they initially shopped these projects at various studios, it often proved more beneficial to distribute them through United Artists. Besides starring and co-producing, Burt even began to direct.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-11-39-06-pm.pn

 

In 1955 their film MARTY earned the Oscar for best picture. Its achievement brought them a level of prestige they didn’t have before. As his career moved forward, Burt earned his own Oscar for ELMER GANTRY. He and Hecht continued to collaborate, though Hill broke off on his own. In the 1960s Burt made a series of films with director John Frankenheimer. He also turned up in westerns. They were popular with audiences and proved he had staying power.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-11-39-52-pm.pn

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. apache (1954); ua; western; jean peters; 91 mins.
  2. vera cruz (1954); ua; western; gary cooper; 94 mins.
  3. the kentuckian (1955); ua; western; diana lynn; 104 mins.
  4. trapeze (1956); ua; drama; tony curtis; 105 mins.
  5. sweet smell of success (1957); ua; drama; tony curtis; 96 mins.
  6. separate tables (1958); ua; drama; rita hayworth; 100 mins.
  7. the devil’s disciple (1959); ua; drama; kirk douglas; 83 mins.
  8. the young savages (1961); ua; crime; dina merrill; 103 mins.
  9. birdman of alcatraz (1962); ua; drama; karl malden; 147 mins.
  10. ulzana’s raid (1972); ua; western; bruce davison; 103 mins.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gypsy Rose Lee has a small part in "The Stripper", too, which has a dazzling performance from Joanne Woodward and a very fine performance from Richard Beymer.

One of my 3 trips to Hollywood on the tour they stopped at Greystone Mansion-(once AFI headquarters& also the locale of yet another bizarre Tinsel-Town murder)  But way up on a hill, perched upon us was the fmr home of GYPSY then owned by Suzanne Sommers

 

(P.S. To anyone that's ever also seen David Lynch's "Twin Peaks" tv series, upon to start again by the way, Beymer was a regular & said to be back on this one)

 

& who agrees he & Chris Sarandon virtually look alike?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-11-43-59-pm1.p

 

Burt Lancaster was a unique movie star. When he was hired to make his first picture, he deliberately chose not to sign with a studio. Instead his contract was with his agent, Harold Hecht, who would sell his services to studios that might be interested in using Burt. In the postwar years, this usually meant producer Hal Wallis at Paramount, or producer Mark Hellenger at Universal– men who were just as independent and found a kindred spirit in Burt.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-11-37-16-pm.pn

 

Burt also had a clause in his deal with Hecht, that after five years he would be allowed to start producing his own films. That was practically unheard of at the time. But Burt was focused on the future and was thinking big. Actually, he didn’t have to wait five years. Within a year, he and Hecht co-produced the noir KISS THE BLOOD OFF MY HANDS, in which Burt played the lead role. Other co-productions soon followed. Several of these were swashbucklers at Warners, and they were hits.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-11-36-29-pm.pn

 

Burt and Harold Hecht formed their own company, which expanded to include writer James Hill. For most of the 50s and into the early 60s, they were unstoppable as a team. Most of their pictures were successful with audiences. While they initially shopped these projects at various studios, it often proved more beneficial to distribute them through United Artists. Besides starring and co-producing, Burt even began to direct.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-11-39-06-pm.pn

 

In 1955 their film MARTY earned the Oscar for best picture. Its achievement brought them a level of prestige they didn’t have before. As his career moved forward, Burt earned his own Oscar for ELMER GANTRY. He and Hecht continued to collaborate, though Hill broke off on his own. In the 1960s Burt made a series of films with director John Frankenheimer. He also turned up in westerns. They were popular with audiences and proved he had staying power.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-06-at-11-39-52-pm.pn

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. apache (1954); ua; western; jean peters; 91 mins.
  2. vera cruz (1954); ua; western; gary cooper; 94 mins.
  3. the kentuckian (1955); ua; western; diana lynn; 104 mins.
  4. trapeze (1956); ua; drama; tony curtis; 105 mins.
  5. sweet smell of success (1957); ua; drama; tony curtis; 96 mins.
  6. separate tables (1958); ua; drama; rita hayworth; 100 mins.
  7. the devil’s disciple (1959); ua; drama; kirk douglas; 83 mins.
  8. the young savages (1961); ua; crime; dina merrill; 103 mins.
  9. birdman of alcatraz (1962); ua; drama; karl malden; 147 mins.
  10. ulzana’s raid (1972); ua; western; bruce davison; 103 mins.

 

What about 1981's brilliant sublte "Atlantic City"-(his 4th & final Oscar nominations)?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the comment, James. It's been a few years since I've seen SCREAMING MIMI. I think I watched it as a Netflix rental when it was first issued on disc. 

& she only made it to age 56 in 1970   On that note Streisand is doing a big screen remake of "GYPSY"

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"La Strada" must have been his crowning achievement.

I recall when they had to get very special permission for him to be buried in his front yard in Rhode Island

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Her performance in "Sunset Boulevard" is one of the screen's greatest performances.

I've always felt she & Bette Davis in "All about Eve" split the vote & Judy Holliday in ":Born Yesterday" won instead-(though wonderful)

that coupled with "Adam's Rib"-(though most list it to be a 1949 release, was up for it's script in 1950)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-6-31-40-am.png

 

Perhaps no other artist demonstrated an independent nature more than Paul Robeson. He was someone who could do it all, and he did. At a young age, he had shown skill in athletics, which led to a college scholarship. In college he took up singing and acting, proving he had talent in those areas, too.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-02-at-10-51-48-am.pn

 

It wasn’t long before Paul made his way to Broadway. Early stage work for him included roles in ‘Taboo’ and ‘All God’s Chillun Got Wings.’ Also, he began to appear in silent films, but of course he would not make his mark in the movies until sound came in. One of Paul’s most celebrated movie performances was as EMPEROR JONES.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-02-at-11-08-43-am.pn

 

Around the same time he signed up for the musical based on Edna Ferber’s ‘Show Boat.’ He played the part of Joe on stage in London, where he and his wife lived. Universal hired him to recreate the role in the film remake with Irene Dunne and Allan Jones. He shared several memorable scenes with Hattie McDaniel.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-02-at-10-58-45-am.pn

 

When he wasn’t working in Hollywood Paul went back to England and appeared in British films. Off screen, he became increasingly active in politics. He supported the U.S. involvement in World War II, but at the same time he espoused pro-Soviet views. This would be problematic for him after the war, when he and so many others became targets during the McCarthy era.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-02-at-11-01-00-am.pn

 

Paul was subsequently blacklisted, and his passport was revoked. It severely curtailed his career and his ability to earn a living. Eventually Paul would survive the blacklist and his passport was reissued, but his health started to decline. Years after his death, Avery Brooks played him in a one-man show on Broadway. The show was revived later, again with Avery Brooks paying tribute to Paul Robeson.

 

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the emperor jones (1933); ua; drama; dudley digges; 72 mins.
  2. sanders of the river (1935); british; drama; leslie banks; 98 mins.
  3. show boat (1936); universal; musical; irene dunne; 113 mins.
  4. song of freedom (1936); british lion; musical drama; elisabeth welch; 70 mins.
  5. big fella (1937); british; musical drama; elisabeth welch; 85 mins.
  6. king solomon’s mines (1937); gaumont; adventure; anna lee; 80 mins.
  7. dark sands (1937); british; drama; henry wilcoxon; 75 mins.
  8. the proud valley (1940); ealing; drama; edward chapman; 76 mins.
  9. native land (1942); independent; documentary; fred johnson; 79 mins.
  10. tales of manhattan (1942); fox; anthology; charles boyer; 118 mins.

 

& most never hard of the man today?   They want everything new & if it was before their time, to them it didn't exist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-04-11-at-6-53-32-am.png

 

Janis Carter’s movie career lasted about a dozen years, from the early 1940s until the mid-1950s. During that time she appeared in films at several Hollywood studios; though the majority of those years were under contract at Columbia. She initially set out to be an opera singer and wound up singing on Broadway which brought her to the attention of a Hollywood mogul. However, by the time she was landing lead roles at Columbia, she was not exactly used for her musical skills.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-4-18-48-pm.png

 

Janis appeared in quite a few crime dramas during the war years, when Columbia had several mystery series in production. For instance, she costarred with Richard Dix in one of the Whistler movies; then was assigned to work with Chester Morris in a BostonBlackie picture; and this was followed by a role opposite Gerald Mohr in a retooled version of The Lone Wolf. These were hardly challenging roles, but Janis made the most of them.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-3-47-43-pm.png

 

When she was not cast in crime pictures, the actress was typically featured as a second lead in comedies headlined by bigger name actresses. She supported Lucille Ball, Barbara Hale and Rosalind Russell in these films. Sometimes she was loaned out and fared a little better. She wrapped up her Columbia contract in 1951 with a lead opposite Randolph Scott in the hit western SANTA FE.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-3-49-06-pm.png

 

After her days at the studio were over, Janis freelanced for a while. But by 1953 she was done with movies and went back east. She found jobs on live television programs and also found stage work. Then she married and decided to give her career up for love.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-3-47-20-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the mark of the whistler (1944); columbia; crime; richard dix; 60 mins.
  2. one mysterious night (1944); columbia; crime; chester morris; 61 mins.
  3. the ghost that walks alone (1944); columbia; comedy; arthur lake; 63 mins.
  4. the fighting guardsman (1945); columbia; adventure; anita louise; 84 mins.
  5. the notorious lone wolf (1946); columbia; crime; gerald mohr; 64 mins.
  6. framed (1947); columbia; crime; glenn ford; 82 mins.
  7. slightly french (1949); columbia; comedy; dorothy lamour; 81 mins.
  8. and baby makes three (1950); columbia; comedy; barbara hale; 83 mins.
  9. a woman of distinction (1950); columbia; comedy; rosalind russell; 85 mins.
  10. santa fe (1951); columbia; western; randolph scott; 87 mins.

 

Only you buddy, could find & come up with these long forgotten performers!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-46-25-pm.png

 

John Saxon was from a working class Italian family in New York. He hadn’t even graduated from high school when his picture appeared on the cover of a magazine. Super agent Henry Wilson noticed and at 17, the young kid was signed to a contract. Wilson gave him his new ‘movie star name’ and put him into acting classes with Stella Adler. For the next two years John prepared for his first motion picture role. Meanwhile, Wilson negotiated a deal for him to appear in films at Universal.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-6-59-15-pm.png

 

In 1955, at the age of 20, John made his first Universal picture, portraying a teenage delinquent in RUNNING WILD. He played a similar but more calculating character a short time afterward in THE UNGUARDED MOMENT where he was a dangerous youth stalking his pretty teacher (Esther Williams). Other films at the studio followed, and gradually he was given more romantic roles to play.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-7-00-21-pm.png

 

During John’s early days at Universal he worked with Sandra Dee several times and more than once with Audie Murphy. The studio also gave him jobs on its television programs, usually western shows. Despite the great exposure, John did not become a lead star; he was featured mainly in supporting roles. By the mid-60s, he was taking on character parts, where he specialized in ethnic types– cast as Italians, Arabs and Mexicans. A lot of these parts were villains, where he was seen as a bandit or a deadly revolutionary.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-7-02-18-pm.png

 

John’s work on television provided opportunities for him to develop his range as a character actor. He had very different roles on The Virginian for Universal; in fact, he’s the only guest star who worked with all the show’s main leads (Lee J. Cobb; Charles Bickford; John McIntire; and Stewart Granger). When he wasn’t on screen, John spent his free time refining techniques in martial arts. This would come in handy when he was hired for Bruce Lee’s first American film, ENTER THE DRAGON.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-7-02-35-pm.png

 

In addition to his assignments as villains and ethnic types, John also became known for playing detectives in horror films and thrillers. He made several Italian police thrillers; and he can be seen investigating deaths at a sorority house in BLACK CHRISTMAS. A few years later, he was investigating killings in THE NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET. He continued to remain in demand on television– he had a recurring role on Falcon Crest as Lorenzo Lamas’ father; and he was a slick Middle Eastern oil dealer in episodes of Dynasty opposite Joan Collins.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-7-04-40-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. running wild (1955); universal; crime; mamie van doren; 81 mins.
  2. the unguarded moment (1956); universal; crime; esther williams; 95 mins.
  3. rock, pretty baby (1956); universal; comedy; sal mineo; 89 mins.
  4. the restless years (1958); universal; drama; sandra dee; 86 mins.
  5. the plunderers (1960); aa; western; jeff chandler; 94 mins.
  6. posse from hell (1961); universal; western; audie murphy; 89 mins.
  7. war hunt (1962); ua; war; robert redford; 83 mins.
  8. the appaloosa (1966); universal; western; marlon brando; 98 mins.
  9. black christmas (1974); warner brothers; horror; olivia hussey; 98 mins.
  10. a nightmare on elm street (1984); new line; horror; 91 mins.

 

I remember John as a kid on "The Six Million Dollar Man"  (NOTE: I think my last response got jammed yup)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about 1981's brilliant sublte "Atlantic City" 

 

Yes, I think it's one of Burt's best later films.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-05-08-at-6-16-00-am.png

 

Dorothy Dandridge and her sister Vivian had a stage mother who pushed them hard. They started at a very young age entertaining audiences. They performed across the midwest then moved to California. Mrs. Dandridge worked, too– she was an actress who played servant roles in films and on radio. But she knew her daughters’ careers would eclipse her own.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-10-57-10-am.pn

 

By the time she was 15, Dorothy and her sister had played many venues– usually skipping school in the process. Their increasingly popular act helped them get hired for their first movie. In early film appearances, they were billed as the Dandridge sisters, but soon Dorothy was performing solo. For the next few years, she continued to find uncredited roles– usually as a singer and a dancer.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-10-57-31-am.pn

 

In the early 40s Dorothy began to work with the Nicholas brothers. She married the youngest brother and had a daughter with him. Dorothy and the Nicholas brothers performed the ‘Chattanooga Choo Choo’ with Glenn Miller and his band in Fox’s energetic musical SUN VALLEY SERENADE. They were a hit, but Dorothy was still having difficulty breaking out of specialty roles. Gradually, she began to get small acting roles in other films, but she still was being held back.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-10-59-17-am.pn

 

Meanwhile Dorothy continued to play nightclubs and she honed her act in front of live audiences. Several years later, she was given the chance to play a jungle queen in a Tarzan movie at RKO. Her provocative wardrobe set Hollywood abuzz, and moviegoers began to notice her. Then Dore Schary hired her for an important dramatic role as a teacher in the social message drama BRIGHT ROAD. It costarred Harry Belafonte, with whom she would work on two more films.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-10-57-59-am.pn

 

The next picture they did was Otto Preminger’s all-black adaptation of CARMEN JONES– it was a smash and earned Dorothy an Oscar nomination as best actress of the year. This was followed up with lesser supporting roles in other motion pictures at Fox. Dorothy also starred in a few European productions later in the 50s, and because there wasn’t the same kind of censorship abroad, she was allowed to wear even more sensational outfits and even kiss one of her white leading men on screen. Of course, none of her subsequent costars matched Harry Belafonte when it came to the chemistry they shared.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-10-58-31-am.pn

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. bahama passage (1941); paramount; drama; madeleine carroll; 82 mins.
  2. sun valley serenade (1941); fox; musical; sonja henie; 86 mins.
  3. atlantic city (1944); republic; musical; constance moore; 87 mins.
  4. tarzan’s peril (1951); rko; adventure; lex barker; 78 mins.
  5. the harlem globetrotters (1951); columbia; sports drama; thomas gomez; 78 mins.
  6. bright road (1953); mgm; drama; harry belafonte; 69 mins.
  7. carmen jones (1954); fox; musical; harry belafonte; 105 mins.
  8. island in the sun (1957); fox; drama; james mason; 119 mins.
  9. tamango (1958); italian; drama; curd jurgens; 98 mins.
  10. porgy and bess (1959); columbia; musical; sidney poitier; 138 mins.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-05-08-at-6-16-00-am.png

 

Dorothy Dandridge and her sister Vivian had a stage mother who pushed them hard. They started at a very young age entertaining audiences. They performed across the midwest then moved to California. Mrs. Dandridge worked, too– she was an actress who played servant roles in films and on radio. But she knew her daughters’ careers would eclipse her own.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-10-57-10-am.pn

 

By the time she was 15, Dorothy and her sister had played many venues– usually skipping school in the process. Their increasingly popular act helped them get hired for their first movie. In early film appearances, they were billed as the Dandridge sisters, but soon Dorothy was performing solo. For the next few years, she continued to find uncredited roles– usually as a singer and a dancer.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-10-57-31-am.pn

 

In the early 40s Dorothy began to work with the Nicholas brothers. She married the youngest brother and had a daughter with him. Dorothy and the Nicholas brothers performed the ‘Chattanooga Choo Choo’ with Glenn Miller and his band in Fox’s energetic musical SUN VALLEY SERENADE. They were a hit, but Dorothy was still having difficulty breaking out of specialty roles. Gradually, she began to get small acting roles in other films, but she still was being held back.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-10-59-17-am.pn

 

Meanwhile Dorothy continued to play nightclubs and she honed her act in front of live audiences. Several years later, she was given the chance to play a jungle queen in a Tarzan movie at RKO. Her provocative wardrobe set Hollywood abuzz, and moviegoers began to notice her. Then Dore Schary hired her for an important dramatic role as a teacher in the social message drama BRIGHT ROAD. It costarred Harry Belafonte, with whom she would work on two more films.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-10-57-59-am.pn

 

The next picture they did was Otto Preminger’s all-black adaptation of CARMEN JONES– it was a smash and earned Dorothy an Oscar nomination as best actress of the year. This was followed up with lesser supporting roles in other motion pictures at Fox. Dorothy also starred in a few European productions later in the 50s, and because there wasn’t the same kind of censorship abroad, she was allowed to wear even more sensational outfits and even kiss one of her white leading men on screen. Of course, none of her subsequent costars matched Harry Belafonte when it came to the chemistry they shared.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-10-58-31-am.pn

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. bahama passage (1941); paramount; drama; madeleine carroll; 82 mins.
  2. sun valley serenade (1941); fox; musical; sonja henie; 86 mins.
  3. atlantic city (1944); republic; musical; constance moore; 87 mins.
  4. tarzan’s peril (1951); rko; adventure; lex barker; 78 mins.
  5. the harlem globetrotters (1951); columbia; sports drama; thomas gomez; 78 mins.
  6. bright road (1953); mgm; drama; harry belafonte; 69 mins.
  7. carmen jones (1954); fox; musical; harry belafonte; 105 mins.
  8. island in the sun (1957); fox; drama; james mason; 119 mins.
  9. tamango (1958); italian; drama; curd jurgens; 98 mins.
  10. porgy and bess (1959); columbia; musical; sidney poitier; 138 mins.

 

She should have been given a more substantial career in Hollywood.

 

Otto Preminger was her Svengali, I believe.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us