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Golden age: Roll call

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She should have been given a more substantial career in Hollywood.

 

Otto Preminger was her Svengali, I believe.

 

Interesting comment, Ray. Never thought of it that way before. 

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I absolutely adore Burt in ATLANTIC CITY!  

 

Same here;   Very few studio-era actors had such a substantial and fine role in their senior years (Melvyn Douglas comes to mind).

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Burt Lancaster deserved the Oscar for Atlantic City,another fantastic performance  from him,Hank Fonda got it but i guess the Academy was influenced by his condition,well,my point of view at the time,i saw both movies when they were released.Burt should have won.

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Burt Lancaster deserved the Oscar for Atlantic City,another fantastic performance  from him,Hank Fonda got it but i guess the Academy was influenced by his condition,well,my point of view at the time,i saw both movies when they were released.Burt should have won.

 

Yes!  I also saw both movies when released.  My theory:  If Henry had won for GRAPES OF WRATH like he should have, Burt would have won for ATLANTIC CITY like he should have.  If Jimmy Stewart had won for MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON, he wouldn't have gotten the "make up" Oscar for PHILADELPHIA STORY and Henry would've won his for GRAPES.  

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Can you guess the ones I will be spotlighting..?


 


Cast of Gunsmoke


screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-10-38-52-am.pn


 


Wednesday May 10-- Marshal Dillon


Thursday May 11-- Chester


Friday May 12-- Miss Kitty


Saturday May 13-- Festus 


Sunday May 14-- Sam the bartender


Monday May 15-- Miss Hannah


 


*Note: I previously featured Milburn Stone, so that's why Doc Adams is not included.


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given his phenomenal immense popularity which still endures to this day, I have always thought it extremely unfair to exclude John Wayne from being recognized as a golden age star merely because he did not have the recognition of a stewart or a fonda which was afforded to them by their studio contract player status.

 

I say wayne's monolithic iconic status demands that he be included among the ranks of Hollywood's golden age stars.

 

the duke so easily earned it. you cannot minimize john wayne for he was the very cinematic symbol of the american WWll fighting G.I.

 

 

what strength!

 

what command of the screen!

 

Duke was the real king!

:)

 

 

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Can you guess the ones I will be spotlighting..?

 

Cast of Gunsmoke

screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-10-38-52-am.pn

 

Wednesday May 10-- Marshal Dillon

Thursday May 11-- Chester

Friday May 12-- Miss Kitty

Saturday May 13-- Festus 

Sunday May 14-- Sam the bartender

Monday May 15-- Miss Hannah

 

*Note: I previously featured Milburn Stone, so that's why Doc Adams is not included.

 

I do wish that there was an entry for Roger Ewing, James Arness' mirror-image.

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I do wish that there was an entry for Roger Ewing, James Arness' mirror-image.

And who saw to it that Arness got the part of Matt Dillon?...

 

his pal John Wayne!

:) 

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the truth be told John Wayne's iconic status was and is unequaled.

 

Duke not only took command of the screen almost like it was second nature to him...

 

he commanded unparalleled star power.

 

the power of Wayne's screen presence remains unmatched.

 

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And who saw to it that Arness got the part of Matt Dillon?...

 

his pal John Wayne!

 

That's correct.

 

I do wish that there was an entry for Roger Ewing, James Arness' mirror-image.

 

Sorry Ray! I also didn't include Burt Reynolds or Buck Taylor. But we can always honor them later.

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screen-shot-2017-05-10-at-8-02-55-am.png

 

With a height of 6’7, Jim Arness rode tall in the saddle on Gunsmoke. For twenty seasons he played Marshal Matt Dillon on the popular western TV series and became a household name. When the program started in 1955, he was introduced to audiences by friend John Wayne. But Jim was not exactly new to the screen, and in fact he had worked with Duke in several movies.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-04-at-2-41-33-pm.png

 

Jim ended up in show biz after a two-year stint in the army during the war. After his discharge, he went to college and found work as a broadcaster. A short time later he headed west (hitchhiking) and arrived in Hollywood, determined to make it in the movies. After a B film at Fox, where he was billed with his family name ‘Aurness,’ he signed with RKO.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-04-at-2-44-16-pm.png

 

Jim’s first motion picture at RKO found him cast as Loretta Young’s kid brother in THE FARMER’S DAUGHTER. It was a perfect role for Jim, who grew up in Minnesota and whose father was Norwegian. Jim was a success with this assignment and the studio assigned roles to him in several other iconic productions.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-04-at-2-47-11-pm.png

 

He would soon appear in THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD, as the title character; and he was also featured in the classic science fiction-horror flick THEM! In the meanwhile, Jim had become pals with Duke.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-04-at-2-40-20-pm.png

 

Together they worked on BIG JIM MCLAIN and THE SEA CHASE, both for Warners. Jim also had good supporting roles at Republic– he appeared with Yvonne De Carlo in the Technicolor adventure drama FLAME OF THE ISLANDS. It was released the same year Gunsmoke premiered. The weekly western series was an immediate hit, and in a way, it ended Jim’s movie career. But after more than 600 episodes and five TV movies as Marshal Dillon, I’m sure he wasn’t complaining.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-04-at-2-39-26-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the farmer’s daughter (1947); rko; drama; loretta young; 97 mins.
  2. sierra (1950); universal; western; audie murphy; 83 mins.
  3. the thing from another world (1951); rko; science fiction horror; kenneth tobey; 87 mins.
  4. the people against o’hara (1951); mgm; crime; spencer tracy; 102 mins.
  5. hellgate (1952); ua; western; sterling hayden; 87 mins.
  6. big jim mclain (1953); warners; crime; john wayne; 90 mins.
  7. horizons west (1953); universal; western; rock hudson; 81 mins.
  8. the lone hand (1953); universal; western; joel mccrea; 80 mins.
  9. them! (1954); warners; science fiction horror; edmund gwenn; 94 mins.
  10. flame of the islands (1955); republic; adventure; yvonne de carlo; 90 mins.
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screen-shot-2017-05-10-at-8-02-55-am.png

 

With a height of 6’7, Jim Arness rode tall in the saddle on Gunsmoke. For twenty seasons he played Marshal Matt Dillon on the popular western TV series and became a household name. When the program started in 1955, he was introduced to audiences by friend John Wayne. But Jim was not exactly new to the screen, and in fact he had worked with Duke in several movies.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-04-at-2-41-33-pm.png

 

Jim ended up in show biz after a two-year stint in the army during the war. After his discharge, he went to college and found work as a broadcaster. A short time later he headed west (hitchhiking) and arrived in Hollywood, determined to make it in the movies. After a B film at Fox, where he was billed with his family name ‘Aurness,’ he signed with RKO.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-04-at-2-44-16-pm.png

 

Jim’s first motion picture at RKO found him cast as Loretta Young’s kid brother in THE FARMER’S DAUGHTER. It was a perfect role for Jim, who grew up in Minnesota and whose father was Norwegian. Jim was a success with this assignment and the studio assigned roles to him in several other iconic productions.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-04-at-2-47-11-pm.png

 

He would soon appear in THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD, as the title character; and he was also featured in the classic science fiction-horror flick THEM! In the meanwhile, Jim had become pals with Duke.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-04-at-2-40-20-pm.png

 

Together they worked on BIG JIM MCLAIN and THE SEA CHASE, both for Warners. Jim also had good supporting roles at Republic– he appeared with Yvonne De Carlo in the Technicolor adventure drama FLAME OF THE ISLANDS. It was released the same year Gunsmoke premiered. The weekly western series was an immediate hit, and in a way, it ended Jim’s movie career. But after more than 600 episodes and five TV movies as Marshal Dillon, I’m sure he wasn’t complaining.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-04-at-2-39-26-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the farmer’s daughter (1947); rko; drama; loretta young; 97 mins.
  2. sierra (1950); universal; western; audie murphy; 83 mins.
  3. the thing from another world (1951); rko; science fiction horror; kenneth tobey; 87 mins.
  4. the people against o’hara (1951); mgm; crime; spencer tracy; 102 mins.
  5. hellgate (1952); ua; western; sterling hayden; 87 mins.
  6. big jim mclain (1953); warners; crime; john wayne; 90 mins.
  7. horizons west (1953); universal; western; rock hudson; 81 mins.
  8. the lone hand (1953); universal; western; joel mccrea; 80 mins.
  9. them! (1954); warners; science fiction horror; edmund gwenn; 94 mins.
  10. flame of the islands (1955); republic; adventure; yvonne de carlo; 90 mins.

 

I'm wondering how much creative control he had over "Gunsmoke".

 

Because this weekly TV Western was almost always a high-quality entry.

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I'm wondering how much creative control he had over "Gunsmoke".

 

Because this weekly TV Western was almost always a high-quality entry.

 

Well, his production company owned a share of it. So I think he did have considerable control, especially in the later seasons. If he had left, the show would've folded. They couldn't do it without him (a recast would have been out of the question).

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the truth be told John Wayne's iconic status was and is unequaled.

 

Duke not only took command of the screen almost like it was second nature to him...

 

he commanded unparalleled star power.

 

the power of Wayne's screen presence remains unmatched.

 

 

Burt Lancaster deserved the Oscar for Atlantic City,another fantastic performance  from him,Hank Fonda got it but i guess the Academy was influenced by his condition,well,my point of view at the time,i saw both movies when they were released.Burt should have won.

My mom was a security guard in the same parking lot you see in the film, around 1980/81   & the rising car lot was there too  She kinda accidentally had BB. King's limo taken away for illegal parking & all his security guards bounced out furious of course. the club *Burt goes into is where BB was playing. She was security a Playboy but got fired. (bus accident,etc)   SUPERBLY SUBTLE FILM, BUT *HENRY FONDA won that year for "0N GOLDEN POND" instead

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given his phenomenal immense popularity which still endures to this day, I have always thought it extremely unfair to exclude John Wayne from being recognized as a golden age star merely because he did not have the recognition of a stewart or a fonda which was afforded to them by their studio contract player status.

 

I say wayne's monolithic iconic status demands that he be included among the ranks of Hollywood's golden age stars.

 

the duke so easily earned it. you cannot minimize john wayne for he was the very cinematic symbol of the american WWll fighting G.I.

 

 

what strength!

 

what command of the screen!

 

Duke was the real king!

:)

 

 

When they voted on "

The King & Queen" of Hollywood "The Duke" wasn't yet appearing in "Stagecoach"

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Same here;   Very few studio-era actors had such a substantial and fine role in their senior years (Melvyn Douglas comes to mind).

AGREED 100%

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Interesting comment, Ray. Never thought of it that way before. 

Ever see the tv movie with Halle Berry?

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Yes, I think it's one of Burt's best later films.

& Sarandon looks even greater today!

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My mom was a security guard in the same parking lot you see in the film, around 1980/81   & the rising car lot was there too  She kinda accidentally had BB. King's limo taken away for illegal parking & all his security guards bounced out furious of course. the club *Burt goes into is where BB was playing. She was security a Playboy but got fired. (bus accident,etc)   SUPERBLY SUBTLE FILM, BUT *HENRY FONDA won that year for "0N GOLDEN POND" instead

It shouldn't matter, what year & who won when, but Fonda deserved his Academy Award as Tom Joad

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When they voted on "

The King & Queen" of Hollywood "The Duke" wasn't yet appearing in "Stagecoach"

He always truly felt he deserved the nomination for same yrs "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" instead

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Burt Lancaster deserved the Oscar for Atlantic City,another fantastic performance  from him,Hank Fonda got it but i guess the Academy was influenced by his condition,well,my point of view at the time,i saw both movies when they were released.Burt should have won.

AGREED 100%

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When they voted on "

The King & Queen" of Hollywood "The Duke" wasn't yet appearing in "Stagecoach"

I know that but when duke did attain his stardom he practically eclipsed everyone else with his powerful screen presence.

 

that's what his detractors doan wanna admit.

 

when duke was on screen he just blew away everyone else.

 

cagney, tracy, gable, bogart, fonda or whoever.

 

duke's screen power was nothing less than awesome!

 

they knew it! the public knew it!

 

duke had more starring leads in films than any other actor his contemporary.

 

that doan happen without a reason and the reason was sheer public popularity.

 

:D

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fine. doan give wayne his golden age ranking.

 

but his screen legacy is undeniable. :P

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fine. doan give wayne his golden age ranking.

 

but his screen legacy is undeniable. :P

 

Wayne doesn't get a metal for honorable service in the Armed Forces either,  but yea his screen legacy is undeniable.  :P

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