TopBilled

Golden age: Roll call

1,426 posts in this topic

 

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Fran Ryan got a late start in the movies and on television. But she had been in show business for many years before she first appeared on screen in the 1960s. Her days as an entertainer can be traced back to when she performed for the troops during the Second World War.

 

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After the war she married a pilot and they were expecting a child when his plane went down. Fran ended up giving birth to their son three months after her husband’s death. Her next husband was also a pilot, and he died in a crash, too. That marriage was even more short-lived than her first one. Maybe she felt it would be jinxing things too much to try again, so she remained unmarried and raised her son on her own. While her boy was growing up, Fran began to take roles in legitimate theater productions and gain valuable experience as an actress.

 

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Gradually she became known for playing gruff, no-nonsense characters. Some folks compared Fran’s style to Marjorie Main and Mary Wickes. In the mid-1960s she began to appear on television programs. For ten episodes she played a housekeeper on Doris Day’s sitcom.

 

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But Fran didn’t stay on Doris’ show long, because she was needed to fill in for Barbara Pepper on Green Acres. When Pepper passed away, Fran took over the part of Doris Ziffel full time. During these years she developed a larger fan base, and in addition to roles on TV, she was now appearing in movies. The types of women she played gave her many scene-stealing moments, and she eventually racked up 144 screen credits.

 

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During the last season of Gunsmoke the show’s producers hired her to take over for Amanda Blake who had vacated the role of saloon owner Miss Kitty. Fran was brought on to the program to play a similar character named Miss Hannah. In the late 80s, when Jim Arness decided to do a reunion movie, Fran and Amanda were both asked to reprise their roles.

 

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  1. the million dollar duck (1971); disney; comedy; dean jones; 89 mins.
  2. the apple dumpling gang (1975); disney; comedy western; bill bixby; 100 mins.
  3. family plot (1976); universal; crime; karen black; 120 mins.
  4. rocky ii (1979); ua; sports drama; sylvester stallone; 119 mins.
  5. the long riders (1980); ua; western; stacy keach; 99 mins.
  6. stripes (1981); columbia; comedy; bill murray; 106 mins.
  7. savannah smiles (1982); embassy; comedy; peter graves; 105 mins.
  8. private school (1983); universal; comedy; ray walston; 88 mins.
  9. the sure thing (1985); embassy; comedy; john cusack; 95 mins.
  10. pale rider (1985); warners; western; clint eastwood; 116 mins.

 

I don't really remember her in anything.

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I don't really remember her in anything.

 

She's very good in THE LONG RIDERS as the tough mother of some outlaws.

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Re' Fran Ryan - really tough break to lose two husbands like that.

 

Yes, a case where truth is stranger than fiction. To have it happen to her twice in a short period of time. 

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Can you guess the ones I will be spotlighting..?


 


Universal contract players


screen-shot-2017-05-18-at-6-39-11-am.jpg


 


Suffered from acromegaly


Married to Ray Danton


Practiced law before becoming an actor


Named after President Eisenhower's wife


Universal's biggest star of the early 50s


Lily Munster


In two films with Joan Bennett & Edward G. Robinson


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Just a heads up-- this may be the last week I do these for awhile. I was planning to take a month off (June) with this thread. I hope that's okay with everyone. It will give me time to focus on some other stuff, and it will give people a chance to catch up and read the ones that have been posted. 

 

I will definitely continue with the thread. There are some patriotic stars I want to feature during the first part of July to coincide with the Independence Day holiday. Thanks for understanding.

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Acromegaly is a condition that develops in some people when they’re adults. It’s hard to pronounce, and even harder to live with. The actor Paul Benedict, who played Mr. Bentley on The Jeffersons had it. And so did Universal horror star Rondo Hatton.

 

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Ironically Rondo had been voted the most handsome guy of his graduating class in school. But as a teen, he hadn’t begun to show signs of the disease, which is caused by an excessive growth hormone. It tends to enlarge one’s facial features, hands and feet. As the disease continues, these features become increasingly grotesque in appearance. In college Rondo studied writing and journalism. His work as a journalist is what led him into the movies. But he still had a more normal-looking appearance then.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-18-at-3-14-10-pm.png

 

It was in 1930 when director Henry King was filming a motion picture in Florida when Rondo was ‘discovered.’ He and King hit it off, and King cast him in an uncredited role in HELL HARBOR. There was another small role in a different film the following year, but Rondo continued to work as a journalist. He stayed in touch with King who invited him out to Hollywood five years later and cast him in an Alice Faye picture at Fox.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-18-at-3-17-40-pm.png

 

At this point, Rondo decided to give acting a shot full-time. He found a series of roles, mostly uncredited, where he played characters that were supposed to be somewhat frightening on screen. He was cast in roles that took advantage of his now evident facial deformities. Besides his work at Fox, Rondo was also directed by Henry King’s brother Lou at Paramount. Plus there was a memorable turn at RKO where he appeared in a scene with Charles Laughton in THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-18-at-3-14-46-pm.png

 

After this he moved over to Universal, a studio known for its horror films. Universal understood that with his looks he could authentically play villains in its B crime flicks and assorted chillers. Soon Rondo appeared in two Sherlock Holmes movies. In one of them he was a scary bad guy named ‘The Creeper,’ a character that was re-used in a separate film series. Rondo was basically dying of acromegaly at the time, but he managed to make two Creeper horror flicks, which were released after his death. In later years Rondo and his image took on a cult status, and he is not forgotten.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-18-at-3-15-17-pm.png

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  1. the pearl of death (1944); universal; crime; basil rathbone; 69 mins.
  2. the jungle captive (1945); universal; horror; otto kruger; 63 mins.
  3. the spider woman strikes back (1946); universal; horror; gale sondergaard; 59 mins.
  4. house of horrors (1946); universal; horror; robert lowery; 65 mins.
  5. the brute man (1946); universal; horror; tom neal; 58 mins.

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Can you guess the ones I will be spotlighting..?

 

Universal contract players

screen-shot-2017-05-18-at-6-39-11-am.jpg

 

Suffered from acromegaly

Married to Ray Danton

Practiced law before becoming an actor

Named after President Eisenhower's wife

Universal's biggest star of the early 50s

Lily Munster

In two films with Joan Bennett & Edward G. Robinson

 

 

 topbilled, Are you going to feature these before or after your break?  What about your WW2 war flicks for women?  Are you off the boards entirely or just this thread?

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 topbilled, Are you going to feature these before or after your break?  What about your WW2 war flicks for women?  Are you off the boards entirely or just this thread?

 

I will post all the Universal contract player pieces I wrote (I shared the one on Rondo Hatton earlier). Then I will take a break from this thread during the month of June.

 

I am still doing the WWII flicks for women. If you check the Essentials forum tomorrow, you will see my write-up for TENDER COMRADE.

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I will post all the Universal contract player pieces I wrote (I shared the one on Rondo Hatton earlier). Then I will take a break from this thread during the month of June.

 

I am still doing the WWII flicks for women. If you check the Essentials forum tomorrow, you will see my write-up for TENDER COMRADE.

 

Thanks for the clarification.

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Who didn’t Julie Adams costar with during her long tenure at Universal? She was paired with all the big stars. And she became a big star herself. Originally the studio changed her first name from Betty to Julia. She was billed as Julia Adams in several early pictures, but she didn’t feel like ‘Julia’ suited her, so they let her go by Julie instead.

 

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Julie was featured in a variety of westerns and horror-science fiction classics. In the western dramas she made, she worked with James Stewart, Robert Ryan and Rock Hudson. In the horror genre, she appeared opposite a creature whose home was the black lagoon. I’m surprised she ever went swimming again after that ordeal.

 

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Julie was at her peak in the 1950s and 1960s as a movie actress; and her contract was often renewed by Universal. She married Ray Danton, a fellow performer at the studio. They had two sons, and after their movie careers waned both moved into television at Universal in the 70s and 80s. Ray became a noted director of episodic TV programs; often Julie appeared as a guest star in episodes of the shows he directed.

 

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In the early 80s Julie signed up for a starring role on the CBS daytime soap opera Capitol. She played Ed Nelson’s deranged wife on the politically-themed sudser. She gained a whole new legion of fans with her work on the series. Later, when the soap was cancelled, Julie returned to primetime guest roles without missing a beat. She had a recurring gig on Murder, She Wrote. The show was produced by– you guessed it– Universal.

 

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  1. bend of the river (1952); universal; western; james stewart; 91 mins.
  2. horizons west (1952); universal; western; robert ryan; 81 mins.
  3. the mississippi gambler (1953); universal; adventure; tyrone power; 99 mins.
  4. the man from the alamo (1953); universal; western; glenn ford; 79 mins.
  5. creature from the black lagoon (1954); universal; horror science fiction; richard carlson; 79 mins.
  6. one desire (1955); universal; drama; rock hudson; 94 mins.
  7. the looters (1955); universal; adventure; ray danton; 87 mins.
  8. the private war of major benson (1955); universal; comedy; charlton heston; 105 mins.
  9. away all boats (1956); universal; war; jeff chandler; 114 mins.
  10. four girls in town (1957); universal; drama; george nader; 85 mins.
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screen-shot-2017-05-19-at-7-15-44-am1.pn

 

Acromegaly is a condition that develops in some people when they’re adults. It’s hard to pronounce, and even harder to live with. The actor Paul Benedict, who played Mr. Bentley on The Jeffersons had it. And so did Universal horror star Rondo Hatton.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-18-at-3-13-53-pm.png

 

Ironically Rondo had been voted the most handsome guy of his graduating class in school. But as a teen, he hadn’t begun to show signs of the disease, which is caused by an excessive growth hormone. It tends to enlarge one’s facial features, hands and feet. As the disease continues, these features become increasingly grotesque in appearance. In college Rondo studied writing and journalism. His work as a journalist is what led him into the movies. But he still had a more normal-looking appearance then.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-18-at-3-14-10-pm.png

 

It was in 1930 when director Henry King was filming a motion picture in Florida when Rondo was ‘discovered.’ He and King hit it off, and King cast him in an uncredited role in HELL HARBOR. There was another small role in a different film the following year, but Rondo continued to work as a journalist. He stayed in touch with King who invited him out to Hollywood five years later and cast him in an Alice Faye picture at Fox.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-18-at-3-17-40-pm.png

 

At this point, Rondo decided to give acting a shot full-time. He found a series of roles, mostly uncredited, where he played characters that were supposed to be somewhat frightening on screen. He was cast in roles that took advantage of his now evident facial deformities. Besides his work at Fox, Rondo was also directed by Henry King’s brother Lou at Paramount. Plus there was a memorable turn at RKO where he appeared in a scene with Charles Laughton in THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-18-at-3-14-46-pm.png

 

After this he moved over to Universal, a studio known for its horror films. Universal understood that with his looks he could authentically play villains in its B crime flicks and assorted chillers. Soon Rondo appeared in two Sherlock Holmes movies. In one of them he was a scary bad guy named ‘The Creeper,’ a character that was re-used in a separate film series. Rondo was basically dying of acromegaly at the time, but he managed to make two Creeper horror flicks, which were released after his death. In later years Rondo and his image took on a cult status, and he is not forgotten.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-18-at-3-15-17-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the pearl of death (1944); universal; crime; basil rathbone; 69 mins.
  2. the jungle captive (1945); universal; horror; otto kruger; 63 mins.
  3. the spider woman strikes back (1946); universal; horror; gale sondergaard; 59 mins.
  4. house of horrors (1946); universal; horror; robert lowery; 65 mins.
  5. the brute man (1946); universal; horror; tom neal; 58 mins.

 

He is interred right down here in Tampa, FL

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In the late 50's and early 60's Ray Danton and Julie Adams became staple performers at Warner Brothers working in all their TV shows and Ray playing Legs Diamond on screen.  Julie was also part of the "Perry Mason stock company"; in one she played the defendant in the one case Perry lost (he still found out who really did it). She then worked on many 4-Star series.  Many of these roles were villainous and let her show just how good an actress she was.  The fact that these producers kept having her back on the shows seems to say she was well liked and respected for her talent.  I'm glad she's still alive to see how remembered she still is      

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In the late 50's and early 60's Ray Danton and Julie Adams became staple performers at Warner Brothers working in all their TV shows and Ray playing Legs Diamond on screen.  Julie was also part of the "Perry Mason stock company"; in one she played the defendant in the one case Perry lost (he still found out who really did it). She then worked on many 4-Star series.  Many of these roles were villainous and let her show just how good an actress she was.  The fact that these producers kept having her back on the shows seems to say she was well liked and respected for her talent.  I'm glad she's still alive to see how remembered she still is      

 

Good comment. Thanks for mentioning the other TV productions she worked on. In the mid-60s she began to be cast against type. She successfully shed the wholesome girl-next-door image she had at Universal in the 50s. She's excellent on an episode of The Big Valley as a politician's scheming wife. When she appeared on Capitol in the 80s, she played a very treacherous woman who shot her politician husband's mistress and devised the perfect alibi. Later the character had someone kidnap the husband to prevent him from leaving her for the other woman. She had a lot of fun with that role.

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He was born with the first name Horace, and in the beginning of his acting career that’s how Stephen was billed– as Horace McNally. Before he was an actor, he studied law and even worked as an attorney for a few years. However, he had been bit by the acting bug and there was no recovering from it.

 

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In the late 1930s Horace McNally learned his new craft in New York. He landed a few roles on Broadway. One of these parts was the lead in the original stage production of ‘Johnny Belinda.’ After his initial Broadway success, he was signed by MGM. Metro didn’t insist on a name change. Perhaps they only saw him as a supporting player or a secondary lead. None of his early movie roles were very distinguished. The studio kept the young actor busy but there were no real opportunities to demonstrate his talent. That would come in the late 40s after he had left MGM.

 

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When Warner Brothers decided to make the film version of ‘Johnny Belinda,’ he was hired for a supporting role and was billed for the first time as Stephen; Lew Ayres played the male lead. Because of his performance in JOHNNY BELINDA, Stephen McNally made a mark as a bad guy. Soon he signed with Universal, where he was cast in crime dramas. He turned up in CRISS CROSS with Burt Lancaster and Yvonne De Carlo. And he played Ida Lupino’s dangerous husband in WOMAN IN HIDING, creating the reason for her character to go into hiding.

 

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Universal also used Stephen in westerns, and there were some notable turns in this genre. He costarred with Alexis Smith several times and had lead roles. But by the late 50s and early 60s he was appearing more on television. Though he did not exactly become a household name, he delivered some worthwhile performances and should be remembered for it.

 

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  1. city across the river (1949); universal; crime; thelma ritter; 91 mins.
  2. the lady gambles (1949); universal; drama; barbara stanwyck; 91 mins.
  3. criss cross (1949); universal; crime; burt lancaster; 84 mins.
  4. sword in the desert (1949); universal; war; dana andrews; 101 mins.
  5. winchester ’73 (1950); universal; western; james stewart; 92 mins.
  6. woman in hiding (1950); universal; drama; ida lupino; 92 mins.
  7. wyoming mail (1950); universal; western; alexis smith; 87 mins.
  8. air cadet (1951); universal; drama; gail russell; 94 mins.
  9. apache drums (1951); universal; western; coleen gray; 75 mins.
  10. the lady pays off (1951); universal; drama; linda darnell; 80 mins.
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screen-shot-2017-05-21-at-6-32-39-am.png

 

He was born with the first name Horace, and in the beginning of his acting career that’s how Stephen was billed– as Horace McNally. Before he was an actor, he studied law and even worked as an attorney for a few years. However, he had been bit by the acting bug and there was no recovering from it.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-21-at-8-49-02-am.png

 

In the late 1930s Horace McNally learned his new craft in New York. He landed a few roles on Broadway. One of these parts was the lead in the original stage production of ‘Johnny Belinda.’ After his initial Broadway success, he was signed by MGM. Metro didn’t insist on a name change. Perhaps they only saw him as a supporting player or a secondary lead. None of his early movie roles were very distinguished. The studio kept the young actor busy but there were no real opportunities to demonstrate his talent. That would come in the late 40s after he had left MGM.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-21-at-8-50-37-am.png

 

When Warner Brothers decided to make the film version of ‘Johnny Belinda,’ he was hired for a supporting role and was billed for the first time as Stephen; Lew Ayres played the male lead. Because of his performance in JOHNNY BELINDA, Stephen McNally made a mark as a bad guy. Soon he signed with Universal, where he was cast in crime dramas. He turned up in CRISS CROSS with Burt Lancaster and Yvonne De Carlo. And he played Ida Lupino’s dangerous husband in WOMAN IN HIDING, creating the reason for her character to go into hiding.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-21-at-8-49-26-am.png

 

Universal also used Stephen in westerns, and there were some notable turns in this genre. He costarred with Alexis Smith several times and had lead roles. But by the late 50s and early 60s he was appearing more on television. Though he did not exactly become a household name, he delivered some worthwhile performances and should be remembered for it.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-21-at-8-51-32-am.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. city across the river (1949); universal; crime; thelma ritter; 91 mins.
  2. the lady gambles (1949); universal; drama; barbara stanwyck; 91 mins.
  3. criss cross (1949); universal; crime; burt lancaster; 84 mins.
  4. sword in the desert (1949); universal; war; dana andrews; 101 mins.
  5. winchester ’73 (1950); universal; western; james stewart; 92 mins.
  6. woman in hiding (1950); universal; drama; ida lupino; 92 mins.
  7. wyoming mail (1950); universal; western; alexis smith; 87 mins.
  8. air cadet (1951); universal; drama; gail russell; 94 mins.
  9. apache drums (1951); universal; western; coleen gray; 75 mins.
  10. the lady pays off (1951); universal; drama; linda darnell; 80 mins.

 

As a bad, bad guy, Stephen McNally made his mark in "Johnny Belinda" and "Winchester '73".

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I remember John as a kid on "The Six Million Dollar Man"  (NOTE: I think my last response got jammed yup)

Top, ironically I was only 2 days ago what happened to Conrad? I know most of Hollywood is not a fan, as he made a jackass on all the eoisides I watch from '78 up   "Battle of the Network Stars"-(a cheezy show, but they shoulda' kept it on)

 

But he did other good work as well

 

Thinkit's be about 82, correct?

 

& Robert would also be  overly compitieve, druink others away   Frankly I'm stunned Quarentino hasbrought himback, yet?

 

 

 

& pn the note, whats it up with both David Schultzs & Paul Gleaserr?

 

 

Ever see a tv series-(tv movie) "The FBI Murders?  That entire thing was really down here around 1986.  He was a complete maniac & didn't care about dying, so long as he could off as many cops as he couple

 

He had a high power gun, looked strong then an AR-15    Pooor Gross was too scared of his buddy to even even talk back either

 

Then towards the end & the feds god them on a side street, but then the FBI didn't barely wear vests,etc & with Soul's gone, which they never saw befire, he killed about 7 FBI agents    MANY RULES HAVE CHANGED SINCE THEN

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She was a curvaceous babe with lots of appeal, but Mamie Van Doren didn’t quite become a household name. It wasn’t for lack of trying. In fact nobody probably worked harder to be taken seriously as a movie actress in the 1950s than Mamie did.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-23-at-5-12-51-am.png

 

As a preteen she and her family had left the midwest and moved out to California. Her name was Joan then, and during the next few years young Joan found jobs as an usher at a movie theater as well as assignments modeling. She also entered beauty pageants around Southern California and when she won one a competition in Palm Springs, she caught the eye of Howard Hughes. He gave her a few bit parts in films as his studio, RKO.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-23-at-5-17-22-am.png

 

The experience at RKO hardly turned Joan into a star, and when she and Hughes broke up, she went to New York to find stage work. She made a splash there and was signed by a Universal talent scout. So back to Hollywood she went. The studio changed her name, calling her Mamie in recognition of the country’s first lady (Mamie Eisenhower). She had minor parts in films with Tony Curtis and Jeff Chandler, then received her first starring roles.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-23-at-5-13-20-am.png

 

For several years Mamie appeared in westerns and crime pictures at Universal. In looks and attitude, she resembled Marilyn Monroe (perhaps intentionally). But none of the Monroe clones, except for possibly Jayne Mansfield, really became big stars. Mamie left Universal and found films at other studios. She became typecast as bad girls when she was featured in stories about juvenile delinquents.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-23-at-5-12-08-am.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. forbidden (1953); universal; crime; tony curtis; 85 mins.
  2. all american (1953); universal; drama; tony curtis; 83 mins.
  3. yankee pasha (1954); universal; adventure; jeff chandler; 84 mins.
  4. francis joins the wacs (1954); universal; comedy; donald o’connor; 95 mins.
  5. ain’t misbehavin’ (1955); universal; musical; jack carson; 82 mins.
  6. running wild (1955); universal; crime; william campbell; 81 mins.
  7. the second greatest sex (1955); universal; comedy; jeanne crain; 87 mins.
  8. star in the dust (1956); universal; western; john agar; 80 mins.
  9. the private lives of adam and eve (1960); universal; comedy; mickey rooney; 86 mins.
  10. college confidential (1960); universal; drama; steve allen; 91 mins.
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screen-shot-2017-05-23-at-5-03-49-am.png

 

She was a curvaceous babe with lots of appeal, but Mamie Van Doren didn’t quite become a household name. It wasn’t for lack of trying. In fact nobody probably worked harder to be taken seriously as a movie actress in the 1950s than Mamie did.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-23-at-5-12-51-am.png

 

As a preteen she and her family had left the midwest and moved out to California. Her name was Joan then, and during the next few years young Joan found jobs as an usher at a movie theater as well as assignments modeling. She also entered beauty pageants around Southern California and when she won one a competition in Palm Springs, she caught the eye of Howard Hughes. He gave her a few bit parts in films as his studio, RKO.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-23-at-5-17-22-am.png

 

The experience at RKO hardly turned Joan into a star, and when she and Hughes broke up, she went to New York to find stage work. She made a splash there and was signed by a Universal talent scout. So back to Hollywood she went. The studio changed her name, calling her Mamie in recognition of the country’s first lady (Mamie Eisenhower). She had minor parts in films with Tony Curtis and Jeff Chandler, then received her first starring roles.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-23-at-5-13-20-am.png

 

For several years Mamie appeared in westerns and crime pictures at Universal. In looks and attitude, she resembled Marilyn Monroe (perhaps intentionally). But none of the Monroe clones, except for possibly Jayne Mansfield, really became big stars. Mamie left Universal and found films at other studios. She became typecast as bad girls when she was featured in stories about juvenile delinquents.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-23-at-5-12-08-am.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. forbidden (1953); universal; crime; tony curtis; 85 mins.
  2. all american (1953); universal; drama; tony curtis; 83 mins.
  3. yankee pasha (1954); universal; adventure; jeff chandler; 84 mins.
  4. francis joins the wacs (1954); universal; comedy; donald o’connor; 95 mins.
  5. ain’t misbehavin’ (1955); universal; musical; jack carson; 82 mins.
  6. running wild (1955); universal; crime; william campbell; 81 mins.
  7. the second greatest sex (1955); universal; comedy; jeanne crain; 87 mins.
  8. star in the dust (1956); universal; western; john agar; 80 mins.
  9. the private lives of adam and eve (1960); universal; comedy; mickey rooney; 86 mins.
  10. college confidential (1960); universal; drama; steve allen; 91 mins.

 

Her finest hour - starring with Clark Gable and Doris Day in "Teacher's Pet"?

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Her finest hour - starring with Clark Gable and Doris Day in "Teacher's Pet"?

 

Yes, that was a good role for her. She did a little better when she made films at Paramount.

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Mamie also was in HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL with Russ Tamblyn in 1958.  It's sort of a cult classic.  Russ plays an undercover cop in a high school and Mamie plays his "aunt" or some such character.  (I'm not aware of COLLEGE CONFIDENTIAL)

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Mamie also was in HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL with Russ Tamblyn in 1958.  It's sort of a cult classic.  Russ plays an undercover cop in a high school and Mamie plays his "aunt" or some such character.  (I'm not aware of COLLEGE CONFIDENTIAL)

 

High School Confidential and Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women both secure Mamie a place in the B-movie Hall of Fame.

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screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-14-08-am.png

 

Without a doubt Jeff Chandler was one of the busiest leading men who ever worked at Universal. He not only starred in countless motion pictures at the studio, he also had two regular starring roles on radio. Plus he ran his own production company.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-16-51-am.png

 

Originally Jeff began his career on the east coast. He had an early job in radio, but spent most of his time in those days touring with a stock company. Along the way Jeff became friends with other performers like Gordon MacRae and Susan Hayward. Life in show biz was put on hold when he served four years during the war. After the war, Jeff resumed acting and found his way to southern California. But he had a tough time breaking into the movies.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-16-19-am.png

 

He began to find success on popular radio programs and starred in the radio version of Michael Shayne. Plus he had a major role with Eve Arden on Our Miss Brooks. During this time he became friends with Dick Powell who lobbied to have him cast in an uncredited role in the Columbia noir JOHNNY O’CLOCK. There were some B films at Fox after this, before Universal hired him to make SWORD OF THE DESERT, in which he had a substantial supporting role. The execs were impressed with Jeff and signed him to a seven-year contract.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-17-44-am.png

 

Jeff was loaned to Fox for BROKEN ARROW, which made him a star and netted him an Oscar nomination. He would repeat his role as Cochise in other films. Back at Universal, he made a string of hit films across several genres, with all the studio’s most important leading ladies. Jeff was soon Universal’s biggest star, though his box office clout would eventually be eclipsed by Rock Hudson.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-15-39-am.png

 

Jeff continued to work for Universal, but in the late 50s and early 60s, he was busy with his own production company and made some independent films in which he starred. Also, he did an early TV movie before his untimely death. One of his last major starring roles found him working at Paramount with his old pal Susan Hayward.

 

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. sword in the desert (1949); universal; war; dana andrews; 101 mins.
  2. abandoned (1949); universal; crime; dennis o’keefe; 79 mins.
  3. deported (1950); universal; crime; marta toren; 89 mins.
  4. smuggler’s island (1951); universal; adventure; evelyn keyes; 75 mins.
  5. flame of araby (1951); universal; adventure; maureen o’hara; 77 mins.
  6. red ball express (1952); universal; war; alex nicol; 83 mins.
  7. yankee buccaneer (1952); universal; adventure; scott brady; 86 mins.
  8. because of you (1952); universal; drama; loretta young; 83 mins.
  9. the great sioux uprising (1953); universal; western; faith domergue; 80 mins.
  10. sign of the pagan (1954); universal; historical drama; jack palance; 92 mins.
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screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-14-08-am.png

 

Without a doubt Jeff Chandler was one of the busiest leading men who ever worked at Universal. He not only starred in countless motion pictures at the studio, he also had two regular starring roles on radio. Plus he ran his own production company.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-16-51-am.png

 

Originally Jeff began his career on the east coast. He had an early job in radio, but spent most of his time in those days touring with a stock company. Along the way Jeff became friends with other performers like Gordon MacRae and Susan Hayward. Life in show biz was put on hold when he served four years during the war. After the war, Jeff resumed acting and found his way to southern California. But he had a tough time breaking into the movies.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-16-19-am.png

 

He began to find success on popular radio programs and starred in the radio version of Michael Shayne. Plus he had a major role with Eve Arden on Our Miss Brooks. During this time he became friends with Dick Powell who lobbied to have him cast in an uncredited role in the Columbia noir JOHNNY O’CLOCK. There were some B films at Fox after this, before Universal hired him to make SWORD OF THE DESERT, in which he had a substantial supporting role. The execs were impressed with Jeff and signed him to a seven-year contract.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-17-44-am.png

 

Jeff was loaned to Fox for BROKEN ARROW, which made him a star and netted him an Oscar nomination. He would repeat his role as Cochise in other films. Back at Universal, he made a string of hit films across several genres, with all the studio’s most important leading ladies. Jeff was soon Universal’s biggest star, though his box office clout would eventually be eclipsed by Rock Hudson.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-15-39-am.png

 

Jeff continued to work for Universal, but in the late 50s and early 60s, he was busy with his own production company and made some independent films in which he starred. Also, he did an early TV movie before his untimely death. One of his last major starring roles found him working at Paramount with his old pal Susan Hayward.

 

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. sword in the desert (1949); universal; war; dana andrews; 101 mins.
  2. abandoned (1949); universal; crime; dennis o’keefe; 79 mins.
  3. deported (1950); universal; crime; marta toren; 89 mins.
  4. smuggler’s island (1951); universal; adventure; evelyn keyes; 75 mins.
  5. flame of araby (1951); universal; adventure; maureen o’hara; 77 mins.
  6. red ball express (1952); universal; war; alex nicol; 83 mins.
  7. yankee buccaneer (1952); universal; adventure; scott brady; 86 mins.
  8. because of you (1952); universal; drama; loretta young; 83 mins.
  9. the great sioux uprising (1953); universal; western; faith domergue; 80 mins.
  10. sign of the pagan (1954); universal; historical drama; jack palance; 92 mins.

 

now there's a guy who died before his time.

 

what a great starship captain jeff woulda made on star trek.

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