TopBilled

Golden age: Roll call

1,426 posts in this topic

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-14-08-am.png

 

Without a doubt Jeff Chandler was one of the busiest leading men who ever worked at Universal. He not only starred in countless motion pictures at the studio, he also had two regular starring roles on radio. Plus he ran his own production company.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-16-51-am.png

 

Originally Jeff began his career on the east coast. He had an early job in radio, but spent most of his time in those days touring with a stock company. Along the way Jeff became friends with other performers like Gordon MacRae and Susan Hayward. Life in show biz was put on hold when he served four years during the war. After the war, Jeff resumed acting and found his way to southern California. But he had a tough time breaking into the movies.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-16-19-am.png

 

He began to find success on popular radio programs and starred in the radio version of Michael Shayne. Plus he had a major role with Eve Arden on Our Miss Brooks. During this time he became friends with Dick Powell who lobbied to have him cast in an uncredited role in the Columbia noir JOHNNY O’CLOCK. There were some B films at Fox after this, before Universal hired him to make SWORD OF THE DESERT, in which he had a substantial supporting role. The execs were impressed with Jeff and signed him to a seven-year contract.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-17-44-am.png

 

Jeff was loaned to Fox for BROKEN ARROW, which made him a star and netted him an Oscar nomination. He would repeat his role as Cochise in other films. Back at Universal, he made a string of hit films across several genres, with all the studio’s most important leading ladies. Jeff was soon Universal’s biggest star, though his box office clout would eventually be eclipsed by Rock Hudson.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-6-15-39-am.png

 

Jeff continued to work for Universal, but in the late 50s and early 60s, he was busy with his own production company and made some independent films in which he starred. Also, he did an early TV movie before his untimely death. One of his last major starring roles found him working at Paramount with his old pal Susan Hayward.

 

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. sword in the desert (1949); universal; war; dana andrews; 101 mins.
  2. abandoned (1949); universal; crime; dennis o’keefe; 79 mins.
  3. deported (1950); universal; crime; marta toren; 89 mins.
  4. smuggler’s island (1951); universal; adventure; evelyn keyes; 75 mins.
  5. flame of araby (1951); universal; adventure; maureen o’hara; 77 mins.
  6. red ball express (1952); universal; war; alex nicol; 83 mins.
  7. yankee buccaneer (1952); universal; adventure; scott brady; 86 mins.
  8. because of you (1952); universal; drama; loretta young; 83 mins.
  9. the great sioux uprising (1953); universal; western; faith domergue; 80 mins.
  10. sign of the pagan (1954); universal; historical drama; jack palance; 92 mins.

 

Jeff Chandler and Joan Crawford were a memorable duo in "Female On The Beach" - he was a man for hire and handled by Cecil Kellaway and Natalie Schaefer; Miss Crawford wasn't able to keep away from him (we hear you, Joan).

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeff Chandler and Joan Crawford were a memorable duo in "Female On The Beach" - he was a man for hire and handled by Cecil Kellaway and Natalie Schaefer; Miss Crawford wasn't able to keep away from him (we hear you, Joan).

 

What an interesting list of recommended films for Jeff Chandler;  I can't recall seeing any of them! 

 

I have seen Johnny O'clock,  Broken Arrow,  Foxfire,  Female On The Beach,  The Tattered Dress, and Return to Peyton Place.

 

Some of those short running adventure films Chandler made for Universal with stars like O'Hara or Keyes sound interesting in that I assume they are fairly fast paced in order to play out the adventure in < 80 minutes.

 

I always liked his screen persona;  just the right balance of the macho with the sensitive.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What an interesting list of recommended film for Jeff Chandler;  I can't recall seeing any of them! 

 

I have seen Johnny O'clock,  Broken Arrow,  Foxfire,  Female On The Beach,  The Tattered Dress, and Return to Peyton Place.

 

Some of those short running adventure films Chandler made for Universal with stars like O'Hara or Keyes sound interesting in that I assume they are fairly fast paced in order to play out the adventure in < 80 minutes.

 

I always like his screen persona;  just the right balance of the macho with the sensitive.  

 

Totally agree about his balance of macho and sensitive. I think some of those action films were under 80 minutes because they were remakes of silent pictures Universal had done decades earlier, back when features were not so long. They didn't add filler scenes and pretty much stuck to the original stories. People went to see them because they were in Technicolor and because they starred Jeff Chandler. LOL

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great looking (great voice, too) guy; gone too soon.  Loved the photos TopBilled selected.  He would have been a wonderful Captain Kirk!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Totally agree about his balance of macho and sensitive. I think some of those action films were under 80 minutes because they were remakes of silent pictures Universal had done decades earlier, back when features were not so long. They didn't add filler scenes and pretty much stuck to the original stories. People went to see them because they were in Technicolor and because they starred Jeff Chandler. LOL

Just looking at him, experiencing him, was worth the price of admission.

 

And he could turn trash - "Return To Peyton Place" - into something meaningful, too.

 

Esther Williams' exposing him was/still is - unforgivable.

 

Some "secrets" should not be divulged.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just looking at him, experiencing him, was worth the price of admission.

 

And he could turn trash - "Return To Peyton Place" - into something meaningful, too.

 

Esther Williams' exposing him was/still is - unforgivable.

 

Some "secrets" should not be divulged.

 

 

I wonder how many extra copies Esther sold of her book for that "revelation." LOL

 

We should say that many people who worked with Jeff Chandler and knew him disputed Esther's claims, dismissing them as fiction and a publicity gimmick.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just looking at him, experiencing him, was worth the price of admission.

 

And he could turn trash - "Return To Peyton Place" - into something meaningful, too.

 

Esther Williams' exposing him was/still is - unforgivable.

 

Some "secrets" should not be divulged.

 

 

Right.  Everyone, even movie stars, is entitled to some privacy.  From what I understand about what Esther Williams said (and I didn't read the book) is that it wasn't such a big deal (at least to me) so I'm kind of "so what" - let him be.  These "tell all" books by relatives always appear after the person being talked about is dead so readers get only a one-sided account.  Unless they're committing some heinous crime or act, maybe just let it be.  Esther should have remembered that at one time she supposedly loved Jeff.  Show a little class. Show some respect.

 

(As an aside, I'll admit I'm not the biggest Esther Williams fan.  Yeah, she could swim, she was pretty but I find her range as an actress somewhat limited and Jeff Chandler could act rings around her.)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right.  Everyone, even movie stars, is entitled to some privacy.  From what I understand about what Esther Williams said (and I didn't read the book) is that it wasn't such a big deal (at least to me) so I'm kind of "so what" - let him be.  These "tell all" books by relatives always appear after the person being talked about is dead so readers get only a one-sided account.  Unless they're committing some heinous crime or act, maybe just let it be.  Esther should have remembered that at one time she supposedly loved Jeff.  Show a little class. Show some respect.

 

(As an aside, I'll admit I'm not the biggest Esther Williams fan.  Yeah, she could swim, she was pretty but I find her range as an actress somewhat limited and Jeff Chandler could act rings around her.)

 

Great post. When I looked at Jeff's filmography, I noticed he had an uncredited role as a singer in THRILL OF A ROMANCE (1945). That's when Esther had become a star at Metro; and Jeff was just starting in Hollywood. Later, after she quit MGM, they made RAW WIND IN EDEN at Universal-- but he was definitely the bigger star in 1958 (though he graciously took second billing-- a nice thing to do since Universal was his home studio and he was one of their top box office attractions).

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great post. When I looked at Jeff's filmography, I noticed he had an uncredited role as a singer in THRILL OF A ROMANCE (1945). That's when Esther had become a star at Metro; and Jeff was just starting in Hollywood. Later, after she quit MGM, they made RAW WIND IN EDEN at Universal-- but he was definitely the bigger star in 1958 (though he graciously took second billing-- a nice thing to do since Universal was his home studio and he was one of their top box office attractions).

Let's face it, Esther Williams had a very big mouth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-10-13-12-pm.pn

 

Not everyone has what it takes to be a movie star. Then again not everyone is as beautiful as Yvonne De Carlo. She was born Margaret but went by her middle name Yvonne when she arrived in Hollywood. De Carlo was her mother’s side of the family, and they were Sicilian, not Spanish, as she often pointed out.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-10-28-07-pm.pn

 

Originally Yvonne and her mother had left their native Canada illegally, and they were deported back across the Canadian border. A short time later mother and daughter were allowed to return to the U.S., legally. They settled in Los Angeles, and Yvonne began to pursue her dreams of becoming a movie star. She was signed with Paramount during the war, but the studio couldn’t seem to figure out how to use her. At one point Yvonne, like so many other actresses, tried out for a role in a Cecil B. DeMille picture, but she was not selected. Soon Paramount dropped her and she was back to square one.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-10-29-33-pm.pn

 

But Yvonne and her mother did not give up. In 1945 she moved over to Universal, and that is where she achieved her greatest success. The studio put her in a sensational action-dance western war picture (there’s no other way to describe it), and she became an overnight star in SALOME, WHERE SHE DANCED. Universal saw great value in promoting its hot new commodity. She was featured in adventure tales and westerns. And occasionally she was used in gritty crime dramas, such as BRUTE FORCE; and the classic noir CRISS CROSS, both with Burt Lancaster.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-10-41-15-pm.pn

 

By the mid-50s, Yvonne had become a freelancer. She was in great demand in England and other parts of Europe. Her career experienced a resurgence when Mr. DeMille asked her to come back to Hollywood and play the part of Sephora in THE TEN COMMANDMENTS. Years later Yvonne cited this as her best performance.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-10-27-27-pm.pn

 

She was now back at Paramount and an even bigger star. She enjoyed other prestigious assignments, including a role opposite Clark Gable in Warners’ BAND OF ANGELS.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-10-48-59-pm.pn

 

In the early 60s Yvonne took a break from the movies. But when her husband, stuntman Bob Morgan, was severely injured on the set of an MGM western, she was forced to return to the screen to pay his medical bills. Their friend John Wayne gave Yvonne a role in MCCLINTOCK!; and producer A.C. Lyles used her in several of his westerns at Paramount in subsequent years. As part of her husband’s settlement with MGM, Yvonne went to work at Metro; and she had strong secondary roles there in the 60s.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-10-29-08-pm.pn

 

She also managed to squeeze in a two-year gig as Lily Munster in the classic sitcom The Munsters. It brought her a whole new audience. Unlike other actresses, she did not become typecast– her versatility led to more opportunities during the following decades. In 1990, she had a good role in Sylvester Stallone’s mobster comedy OSCAR, where she was able to play a character that was Sicilian, not Spanish.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-25-at-10-44-50-pm.pn

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. salome, where she danced (1945); universal; western war adventure; rod cameron; 90 mins.
  2. frontier gal (1945); universal; western; rod cameron; 84 mins.
  3. song of scheherazade (1947); universal; musical comedy; jean-pierre aumont; 105 mins.
  4. slave girl (1947); universal; adventure; george brent; 80 mins.
  5. casbah (1948); universal; musical adventure; tony martin; 94 mins.
  6. black bart (1948); universal; western; dan duryea; 80 mins.
  7. river lady (1948); universal; western; rod cameron; 78 mins.
  8. criss cross (1949); universal; crime; burt lancaster; 84 mins.
  9. calamity jane and sam bass (1949); universal; western; howard duff; 86 mins.
  10. the gal who took the west (1949); universal; western; charles coburn; 84 mins.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tomorrow I will post the last write-up on Universal stars-- it focuses on Dan Duryea. Then I will be taking a temporary break with this thread. But there will be more weekly themes and columns starting again in July. Thanks for allowing me to have a bit of the summer "off." LOL

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-05-28-at-8-01-21-am.png

 

Dan Duryea spent several years as an ad exec before he gave up the life of a nine-to-five job and pursued acting. The theater was his real love, and he began to earn favorable notices. He had a strong role in the original production of ‘Dead End,’ then made a name for himself in ‘The Little Foxes.’ Producer Samuel Goldwyn was impressed and hired him for the feature film version.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-27-at-4-55-36-pm.png

 

During his time with Goldwyn, Dan appeared opposite Gary Cooper in THE PRIDE OF THE YANKEES. He soon became known for his idiosyncratic turns in support of bigger stars. He and Cooper reunited for the western ALONG CAME JONES; and Dan also collaborated twice with Joan Bennett in the Fritz Lang crime dramas WOMAN IN THE WINDOW and SCARLET STREET.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-27-at-4-56-39-pm.png

 

SCARLET STREET was made at Universal; and soon Dan signed on exclusively with the studio to make a series of thrillers and crime dramas. Usually Dan was cast in villainous parts; and he did quite well at that. Sometimes his shadier characters were the main focus, and he snagged a lead role.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-27-at-4-53-58-pm.png

 

In addition to crime pictures, he found a niche playing rogues in westerns at Universal. He worked with James Stewart and Audie Murphy several times– in one film, NIGHT PASSAGE, they all appeared together. Dan also made forays into television– he starred in two seasons of his own adventure program. Later Dan went overseas and appeared in some European productions. But he would mostly be remembered for his strong film performances at Universal.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-27-at-4-53-18-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. scarlet street (1945); universal; crime; joan bennett; 102 mins.
  2. black angel (1946); universal; crime; june vincent; 81 mins.
  3. black bart (1948); universal; western; yvonne de carlo; 80 mins.
  4. larceny (1948); universal; crime; john payne; 89 mins.
  5. johnny stool pigeon (1949); universal; crime; howard duff; 76 mins.
  6. winchester ’73 (1950); universal; western; james stewart; 92 mins.
  7. ride clear of diablo (1954); universal; western; audie murphy; 80 mins.
  8. foxfire (1955); universal; drama; jane russell; 92 mins.
  9. night passage (1957); universal; western; james stewart; 90 mins.
  10. kathy o’ (1958); universal; comedy; patty mccormack; 99 mins.
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-05-28-at-8-01-21-am.png

 

Dan Duryea spent several years as an ad exec before he gave up the life of a nine-to-five job and pursued acting. The theater was his real love, and he began to earn favorable notices. He had a strong role in the original production of ‘Dead End,’ then made a name for himself in ‘The Little Foxes.’ Producer Samuel Goldwyn was impressed and hired him for the feature film version.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-27-at-4-55-36-pm.png

 

During his time with Goldwyn, Dan appeared opposite Gary Cooper in THE PRIDE OF THE YANKEES. He soon became known for his idiosyncratic turns in support of bigger stars. He and Cooper reunited for the western ALONG CAME JONES; and Dan also collaborated twice with Joan Bennett in the Fritz Lang crime dramas WOMAN IN THE WINDOW and SCARLET STREET.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-27-at-4-56-39-pm.png

 

SCARLET STREET was made at Universal; and soon Dan signed on exclusively with the studio to make a series of thrillers and crime dramas. Usually Dan was cast in villainous parts; and he did quite well at that. Sometimes his shadier characters were the main focus, and he snagged a lead role.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-27-at-4-53-58-pm.png

 

In addition to crime pictures, he found a niche playing rogues in westerns at Universal. He worked with James Stewart and Audie Murphy several times– in one film, NIGHT PASSAGE, they all appeared together. Dan also made forays into television– he starred in two seasons of his own adventure program. Later Dan went overseas and appeared in some European productions. But he would mostly be remembered for his strong film performances at Universal.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-27-at-4-53-18-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. scarlet street (1945); universal; crime; joan bennett; 102 mins.
  2. black angel (1946); universal; crime; june vincent; 81 mins.
  3. black bart (1948); universal; western; yvonne de carlo; 80 mins.
  4. larceny (1948); universal; crime; john payne; 89 mins.
  5. johnny stool pigeon (1949); universal; crime; howard duff; 76 mins.
  6. winchester ’73 (1950); universal; western; james stewart; 92 mins.
  7. ride clear of diablo (1954); universal; western; audie murphy; 80 mins.
  8. foxfire (1955); universal; drama; jane russell; 92 mins.
  9. night passage (1957); universal; western; james stewart; 90 mins.
  10. kathy o’ (1958); universal; comedy; patty mccormack; 99 mins.

 

Dan Duryea and Lizabeth Scott were terrific together in "Too Late For Tears".

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/25/2017 at 4:11 PM, TopBilled said:

 

Great post. When I looked at Jeff's filmography, I noticed he had an uncredited role as a singer in THRILL OF A ROMANCE (1945). That's when Esther had become a star at Metro; and Jeff was just starting in Hollywood. Later, after she quit MGM, they made RAW WIND IN EDEN at Universal-- but he was definitely the bigger star in 1958 (though he graciously took second billing-- a nice thing to do since Universal was his home studio and he was one of their top box office attractions).

As Fanny Brice said "Wet, Esther's a star, dry, she ain't", so even other golden age celebrities didn't all care for her. I like Esther, but that's just my opinion. She was pleasant, pretty, a great swimmer, and her swimming musical numbers were spectacular. But, she didn't really have much else such as a knack for good comedy, and didn't portray very deep or interesting characters in her films, and I can see how some may not find her their favorite for those reasons. I did enjoy "Thrill of a romance" though, it was a nice, feel good romance with comedy added such as opera singer Lauritz Melchior struggling to stay on a diet while being watched over by his wife, and the humorous scene of him finally convincing the manager to let him sing for a steak and beer, only to have his nagging wife snatch it from him. That film was also a showcase of some talent with besides Esther's swimming, there was Lauritz's great opera singing, Buddy Rich's very fast and skilled drum playing, Tommy Dorsey's daughter Susan's talented piano playing a very good jazzed up version of Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody and "The man with the sliding trombone", and then there was that kid (bellhop) who tried to hide a gifted singing voice of his own, then was discovered by Lauritz while singing "Don't say no, say maybe" and then sang "Because" for the hotel.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Ruby jewel said:

As Fanny Brice said "Wet, Esther's a star, dry, she ain't", so even other golden age celebrities didn't all care for her. I like Esther, but that's just my opinion. She was pleasant, pretty, a great swimmer, and her swimming musical numbers were spectacular. But, she didn't really have much else such as a knack for good comedy, and didn't portray very deep or interesting characters in her films, and I can see how some may not find her their favorite for those reasons. I did enjoy "Thrill of a romance" though, it was a nice, feel good romance with comedy added such as opera singer Lauritz Melchior struggling to stay on a diet while being watched over by his wife, and the humorous scene of him finally convincing the manager to let him sing for a steak and beer, only to have his nagging wife snatch it from him. That film was also a showcase of some talent with besides Esther's swimming, there was Lauritz's singing, Buddy Rich's drum playing, Tommy Dorsey's daughter Susan's talented piano playing a very good jazzed up version of Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody and "The man with the sliding trombone", and then there was that kid (bellhop) who tried to hide a gifted singing voice of his own, then was discovered by Lauritz while singing "Don't say no, say maybe" and then sang "Because" for the hotel.

Yes. They had to bring in others to do the comic relief, or play the more serious stuff. Though I do think Esther Williams is quite good in the non-aquatic thriller THE UNGUARDED MOMENT.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Yes. They had to bring in others to do the comic relief, or play the more serious stuff. Though I do think Esther Williams is quite good in the non-aquatic thriller THE UNGUARDED MOMENT.

I have not had the chance to see "The unguarded moment" yet. It's still on my list of not yet watched Golden age films that I want to see. I love golden age films, have seen hundreds of them now, but thankfully, there are a great many of them and more for me to go and see

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Ruby jewel said:

As Fanny Brice said "Wet, Esther's a star, dry, she ain't", so even other golden age celebrities didn't all care for her. I like Esther, but that's just my opinion. She was pleasant, pretty, a great swimmer, and her swimming musical numbers were spectacular. But, she didn't really have much else such as a knack for good comedy, and didn't portray very deep or interesting characters in her films, and I can see how some may not find her their favorite for those reasons. I did enjoy "Thrill of a romance" though, it was a nice, feel good romance with comedy added such as opera singer Lauritz Melchior struggling to stay on a diet while being watched over by his wife, and the humorous scene of him finally convincing the manager to let him sing for a steak and beer, only to have his nagging wife snatch it from him. That film was also a showcase of some talent with besides Esther's swimming, there was Lauritz's great opera singing, Buddy Rich's very fast and skilled drum playing, Tommy Dorsey's daughter Susan's talented piano playing a very good jazzed up version of Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody and "The man with the sliding trombone", and then there was that kid (bellhop) who tried to hide a gifted singing voice of his own, then was discovered by Lauritz while singing "Don't say no, say maybe" and then sang "Because" for the hotel.

Actually, Brice was not talking about Esther with that quote, but about husband Billy Rose's latest Aquatic (ahem!) Star at his water show in San Francisco.  Let's not rewrite Hollywood history.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Wet she's a star, dry she ain't" refers to Eleanor Holm, star of Billy Roses's Aquacade, not to Esther Williams.  In 1938, Rose divorced Fanny Brice and in 1939 he married Holm. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, filmnoirguy said:

"Wet she's a star, dry she ain't" refers to Eleanor Holm, star of Billy Roses's Aquacade, not to Esther Williams.  In 1938, Rose divorced Fanny Brice and in 1939 he married Holm. 

Thanks for clarifying. I think it's an oft-repeated quote that has long been associated with Esther Williams. Most people probably don't know who Eleanor Holm was.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/21/2018 at 2:20 PM, filmnoirguy said:

Actually, Brice was not talking about Esther with that quote, but about husband Billy Rose's latest Aquatic (ahem!) Star at his water show in San Francisco.  Let's not rewrite Hollywood history.

Not trying to rewrite anything, I really thought Brice was talking about Esther. As big as a fan as I am of the golden age, I'm always learning more as I go, there's still alot I don't know.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Ruby jewel said:

Not trying to rewrite anything, I really thought Brice was talking about Esther. As big as a fan as I am of the golden age, I'm always learning more as I go, there's still alot I don't know.

Good attitude. We're all learning more as we go along.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/25/2018 at 8:59 PM, TopBilled said:

Good attitude. We're all learning more as we go along.

I do like having found this site with other 1930s, 40s, and 50s movie fans to share my interests with. I'd like to find some kind of group where I can meet with other Golden age fans in person, but have not been able to find any yet.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ruby jewel said:

I do like having found this site with other 1930s, 40s, and 50s movie fans to share my interests with. I'd like to find some kind of group where I can meet with other Golden age fans in person, but have not been able to find any yet.

In one town I lived in, about ten years ago, I started a Film Club at the local library. I created a program of films-- just six films, one film a month for six months. I knew a lot of people wouldn't come at first. But word of mouth would spread and the group grew in number. I moved away after the six months and it was up to them to continue it. When I watch any of those six films, I remember those people and the discussions we had at the library.

You could do something like that. It didn't cost anything. We didn't have to pay to screen the films, since it was for educational purposes and not for profit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/28/2018 at 11:29 AM, TopBilled said:

In one town I lived in, about ten years ago, I started a Film Club at the local library. I created a program of films-- just six films, one film a month for six months. I knew a lot of people wouldn't come at first. But word of mouth would spread and the group grew in number. I moved away after the six months and it was up to them to continue it. When I watch any of those six films, I remember those people and the discussions we had at the library.

You could do something like that. It didn't cost anything. We didn't have to pay to screen the films, since it was for educational purposes and not for profit.

I could start a group here in Kansas city where I live, since I have not been able to find such a group online near me (although there were several in New York (New York has more variety of everything though)). Since I also play some of those great 1930s songs on piano such as "42nd St" and "I only have eyes for you", one of those groups would also be an excellent opportunity to share my 20s, 30s and 40s style piano playing (I also play "Charleston"). I have played piano in two different nursing homes in the past year, but even they aren't a garuntee of finding fans of that era's music. One of the homes I played in, the activities director told me afterwards that there were residents there complaining about me playing music that was too old and wanted to hear newer music such as Elvis and the Beatles. That particular home though was also more of a recovery center than an old age home and there were numerous residents there in their 50s and 60s (some 70s and 80s too). I can see how 50 and 60 something year olds may not care for 20s and 30s music since that era ended before they were even born. This is why my best option for playing the music (besides a home where almost everyone is over 80) is not a nursing home, but me playing those songs on piano in a specialized group for serious fans of 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s music and films.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Ruby jewel said:

I could start a group here in Kansas city where I live, since I have not been able to find such a group online near me (although there were several in New York (New York has more variety of everything though)). Since I also play some of those great 1930s songs on piano such as "42nd St" and "I only have eyes for you", one of those groups would also be an excellent opportunity to share my 20s, 30s and 40s style piano playing (I also play "Charleston"). I have played piano in two different nursing homes in the past year, but even they aren't a garuntee of finding fans of that era's music. One of the homes I played in, the activities director told me afterwards that there were residents there complaining about me playing music that was too old and wanted to hear newer music such as Elvis and the Beatles. That particular home though was also more of a recovery center than an old age home and there were numerous residents there in their 50s and 60s (some 70s and 80s too). I can see how 50 and 60 something year olds may not care for 20s and 30s music since that era ended before they were even born. This is why my best option for playing the music (besides a home where almost everyone is over 80) is not a nursing home, but me playing those songs on piano in a specialized group for serious fans of 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s music and films.

Interesting. Yes, you have to find an audience who appreciates the same music and films you do.

When I started the film club, I advertised it by putting up flyers in the library where I reserved a conference room each month. Attendance was small at first but by the third month, word of mouth spread and the group grew in number. The main idea was to provide something for others who also wanted to discuss classic film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us