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hamradio

Wish I have the room (and the $)

8 posts in this topic

Lucky guy.  :D

 

According to the DVD "Great MTH Layouts", the trees ALONE cost $60,000!  (this is not a typo)

 

 

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We occasionally purchase magazines dedicated to specific hobbies because it allows us insight into people's various passions. We have many model railroading magazines because it is a hobby whose practitioners have particular intensity.

 

This would be known as a prototypical layout because it accurately represents a particular area and era. It is part of the era of: 'revenue steam' because steam engines were primary. I must wonder if there are any sprung frogs in the layout.

 

The number of scale-model buildings available is awesome. I believe it was last year that one supplier introduced the Bates house in HO scale. 

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This would be known as a prototypical layout because it accurately represents a particular area and era. It is part of the era of: 'revenue steam' because steam engines were primary. I must wonder if there are any sprung frogs in the layout.

 

 

 

John Shankland did the Chicago / Burlington single ended classification yard in Hi Rail to reflect the 1950 - 60's.  Everything is in fine detail concerning operations - classification tracks, switches, signals, service area, dispatching station and steam / diesel switching locomotives.

 

No hand touches the cars or locomotives.

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As a model railroader (N scale), I can appreciate the time, labor and money that went into building this layout.  The absolute worst aspect is the maintenance.  Frequently, the tracks have to be cleaned and the engines require cleaning of the wheels as a minimum.  Sometime disassembling engines to clean electrical contacts inside, oil and grease them.

BTW, it is not exactly steam era.  Never heard the expression "steam revenue era."  Have to ask my steam friends about that.  There are Amtrak and Norfolk Southern engines on the roundhouse tracks.   However, it is primarily steam.  Might consider it the transition period when railroads were going from steam to diesel.  This began in late 30's and ended in late '50's for most railroads.

 

Like most modelers though, it is hard to stick to our self-created historical rationale.  Mine is modeled for 1967 in South Carolina, but is what is called "freelanced."  That means I created a railroad of my own, but try to follow prototype procedures. Prototype means real railroads and railroad procedures.  I also heavily model Southern and Seaboard Coast Line railroads from this period.

However when I have opened it up for showings, I would drag out a steam engine or an Amtrak train. I also have freight cars for railroads I like that did not even exist in 1967.

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Trivia: According to the "Norfolk and Western Steam Freight" video, the era of steam officially ended on May 7, 1960 in Williamson, West Virginia when the switcher 291, an S1A 0-8-0 dropped it boiler for the last time.  Williamson is one of the largest  classification yards east of the Mississippi. 

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Never heard the expression "steam revenue era."

 

 

It is my understanding that: "revenue steam" indicates when steam locomotives provided majority of income for railroads. I have seen timetables for era classifications of layouts and: "revenue steam" is between: "post-civil war" and "diesel" eras.

 

Brian Solomon says of his wonderful book: The Twilight of Steam: Great Photography from the Last Days of Steam Locomotives in America: "Significantly, The Twilight of Steam focuses on evocative images exposed toward the end of the era of revenue steam operations."

 

Do you have photographs of your freelance N-scale layout? I have great interest in why modelers chose certain elements for their layouts.

 

We have talked much of building fantasy layout when we have time/space/cash for such things. It would require much work because we wish it to be live steam in HO and there are no suitable engines readily available. 

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It is my understanding that: "revenue steam" indicates when steam locomotives provided majority of income for railroads. I have seen timetables for era classifications of layouts and: "revenue steam" is between: "post-civil war" and "diesel" eras.

 

Brian Solomon says of his wonderful book: The Twilight of Steam: Great Photography from the Last Days of Steam Locomotives in America: "Significantly, The Twilight of Steam focuses on evocative images exposed toward the end of the era of revenue steam operations."

 

Do you have photographs of your freelance N-scale layout? I have great interest in why modelers chose certain elements for their layouts.

 

We have talked much of building fantasy layout when we have time/space/cash for such things. It would require much work because we wish it to be live steam in HO and there are no suitable engines readily available. 

Thanks for info.

Sorry, I don't have pictures of the layout that I can post.  But it "depicts" Spartanburg, Columbia and Charleston S.C. primarily as passenger points, but fair amount of freight. However, I have sort of moved into automobiles and automobile services. Gas stations, auto dealerships, motels, etc.

I chose 1967 as it is the year SAL and ACL combined to create SCL, so all three names can be used on cars and engines.  Also, Southern and Clinchfield were still around.  SAL, ACL and Southern had significant passenger train presence before Amtrak.  Manyu of their former routes still exist under Amtrak.

HO steam would be great, but as you say probably not a lot out there (if any).  From what I have seen of live steam, it is a lot of maintenance and produces pretty strong odors. 

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