JakeHolman

VETERANS DAY

172 posts in this topic

Thank You.

It's the soldier, not the reporter who has given us
Freedom of the Press.
It's the soldier, not the poet, who has given us
Freedom of Speech.
It's the soldier, not the campus organizer, who has given us the
Freedom to Demonstrate.
It's the soldier, not the lawyer, who has given us the
Right to a Fair Trial.
It's the soldier who salutes the flag, serves under the flag and
whose coffin is draped by the flag,
Who gives the protestor the right to burn the flag.
~Father Dennis Edward O'Brien, USMC

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Veterans Day began as Armistice Day, to mark the end of World War I. Wilfred Owen, the greatest of all war poets, died in battle a week before that day. His powerful and realistic poems have no equal in the annals of war poetry:

 

Anthem for Doomed Youth

By Wilfred Owen (1893-1918)

 

What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?
Only the monstrous anger of the guns.
Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle
Can patter out their hasty orisons.
No mockeries for them; no prayers nor bells,
Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs,—
The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;
And bugles calling for them from sad shires.

What candles may be held to speed them all?
Not in the hands of boys, but in their eyes
Shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes.
The pallor of girls' brows shall be their pall;
Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds,
And each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds.

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I posted this on another thread before I saw this one.  Two might be better than one.

 

Can somebody please download the words to the final scene from Fort Apache where John Wayne as Captain York gives the press that monologue about the "Regular Army" and how it will still be the same "50 years from now" which is now 150?  I just heard it on Encore but it went too fast for me to write down.  It's perfect for today.  HAPPY VETERANS DAY to all it applies to; our family counts twelve.

 

The quote was posted in the "Favorite Lines from a Movie" thread on the My Favorites Forum.  Some things might be different but I'm certain the spirit of our military personnel hasn't.  I've been thinking about it since yesterday and am glad it's on the Board for all to see.  

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Jake and Swithin:  Thank you for the beautiful poetry.  While today is for those who came through the fights alive and can enjoy the gratitude so many are hurt in body, mind and soul and need to know what they've given is appreciated.  My Sis and "the love of my life" are two.

 

Sis says in Texas there are four restaurant chains in Austin who are treating vets to meals today.  Whatever my opinions about who's running the State, it gets a shout-out from me.

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"Don't Thank Me Anymore ... Just Care for Veterans Who Return and Work to End All War"

 

http://www.truth-out.org/opinion/item/33609-don-t-thank-me-anymore-just-care-for-veterans-who-return-and-work-to-end-all-war

 

"For decades, Vietnam veterans were denied recognition of illnesses caused by the extremely deadly chemical dioxin in Agent Orange. Gulf War veterans are struggling with Gulf War Syndrome.  And now the challenges faced by returning troops today. The madness and suffering will not end until civilians demand a different way. Maybe because you don't have to fight the wars, you don't care. I don't know. But with all the above I outlined, I repeat, don't thank us anymore. Change the above and work to end war.  That's real thanks."

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FLANDERS FIELDS POEM

 

The World’s Most Famous WAR MEMORIAL POEM

By Canadian, Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae

 

 

 

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place: and in the sky

The larks still bravely singing fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

 

We are the dead: Short days ago,

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved: and now we lie

In Flanders fields!

 

Take up our quarrel with the foe

To you, from failing hands, we throw

The torch: be yours to hold it high

If ye break faith with us who die,

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields

 

Composed at the battlefront on May 3, 1915

during the second battle of Ypres, Belgium

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Good thoughts for all veterans, today and every day.  

 

That includes my father, a pilot in WWII, who observed the day by playing golf.

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Sis says in Texas there are four restaurant chains in Austin who are treating vets to meals today.  Whatever my opinions about who's running the State, it gets a shout-out from me.

These are probably national chains with a national policy.  There are several that do it.

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4e608534a5a889bffa37ced974b61980.jpg

It Is The Soldier

It is the Soldier, not the minister
Who has given us freedom of religion.

It is the Soldier, not the reporter
Who has given us freedom of the press.

It is the Soldier, not the poet
Who has given us freedom of speech.

It is the Soldier, not the campus organizer
Who has given us freedom to protest.

It is the Soldier, not the lawyer
Who has given us the right to a fair trial.

It is the Soldier, not the politician
Who has given us the right to vote.

It is the Soldier who salutes the flag,
Who serves beneath the flag,
And whose coffin is draped by the flag,
Who allows the protester to burn the flag.

Charles Michael Province, U.S. Army

Copyright Charles M. Province, 1970, 2005.
All rights reserved.

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.....

 

 

 

Charles Michael Province, U.S. Army

 

Copyright Charles M. Province, 1970, 2005.

All rights reserved.

 

I don't think he mind you quoting him but it's best to play it safe.  Some busybody might notify the law of Copyright infringement. ;)

 

happy-veterans-day-quotes-sms-for-vetera

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Oh, here you are!

 

I started a Veterans Day thread early this morning hoping to beat you to the punch but couldn't get the pictures I chose off the clip pages to post so I just said my piece.  It was read but not commented on.  I just found this one; I knew you wouldn't, couldn't let today go by in silence.  Your visuals are beautiful.

 

Today is special; on that I hope we will always agree.

 

P. S.  Thanks for the quote from the Catholic chaplain.

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I've never quite figured out what to thank them for, except

for their general service in national defense, but most

countries have an armed force that provides the same

function. For us not speaking Vietnamese. No, I don't

think so. The modern day U.S. reminds me of a tiresome

version of the British Empire, constantly celebrating

some war or other and those who fought in some war

or other. It's all rather pathetic.

 

Ol' Bone Spurs expressing his deepest gratitude to

veterans. Too funny.

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I've never quite figured out what to thank them for, except

for their general service in national defense...

 

That right there would be enough to thank them for, Vautrin.

 

However, and in MY case, the only problem I'M having lately is all this recent liberal use of the word "heroes" to describe all military veterans.

 

'Cause ya see, my father who was a combat veteran of WWII and who was awarded 6 bronze battle stars during HIS service to our country at that time, would have SCOFFED at the idea that HE was ever some kind of "hero" for just doing his duty and one he had signed on to do.

 

(...saaay, maybe THIS is why THAT generation is now collectively known as "The Greatest Generation", and because so many of THEM seemed to know the value of placing the proper words into the proper context, and a concept which occasionally seems so lacking in generations since)

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That right there would be enough to thank them for, Vautrin.

 

However, and in MY case, the only problem I'M having lately is all this recent liberal use of the word "heroes" to describe all military veterans.

 

'Cause ya see, my father who was a combat veteran of WWII and who was awarded 6 bronze battle stars during HIS service to our country at that time, would have SCOFFED at the idea that HE was ever some kind of "hero" for just doing his duty and one he had signed on to do.

 

(...saaay, maybe THIS is why THAT generation is now collectively known as "The Greatest Generation", and because so many of THEM seemed to know the value of placing the proper words into the proper context, and a concept which occasionally seems so lacking in generations since)

I guess so, though most countries have an armed force that

performs that job. And the military conflicts we've been engaged

in over the last fifty years haven't had much to do with actually

defending our country from attack. The local paper put out a Veteran's

Day special with photos of local veterans from all eras and it was

called a salute to our heroes. To me a hero meant someone who

had gone beyond the usual and done extraordinary things. Now

it's anybody who served, even the guy who was scrubbing pots

down in the galley.

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Your current discussion interests me, as a vet who always finds it awkward when someone finds out I served and promptly thanks me "for my service."  I try to gently say something to the effect that it's combat vets who really deserve our gratitude, as my military career never put me in such danger. 

 

Sure, there was some patriotism involved in my initial decision to enlist, but making it a career was more pragmatic.  It definitely was my ticket out of my small Rust Belt town that was already in decline when I left, and for that I was most grateful. 

 

As Dargo indicated, our WWII vets were usually reticent about discussing any of their wartime experiences.

 

This whole "thank you for your service" is a fairly recent phenomenon, one I hope will soon fade into oblivion.

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Your current discussion interests me, as a vet who always finds it awkward when someone finds out I served and promptly thanks me "for my service." I try to gently say something to the effect that it's combat vets who really deserve our gratitude, as my military career never put me in such danger.

 

Sure, there was some patriotism involved in my initial decision to enlist, but making it a career was more pragmatic. It definitely was my ticket out of my small Rust Belt town that was already in decline when I left, and for that I was most grateful.

 

As Dargo indicated, our WWII vets were usually reticent about discussing any of their wartime experiences.

 

This whole "thank you for your service" is a fairly recent phenomenon, one I hope will soon fade into oblivion.

 

 

My father was a Master Sergeant in World War II in the United States Army.

 

He served in the Normandy Invasion, The Liberation of Paris and then finally in the Battle of the Bulge. After he fortunately survived the Battle of the Bulge, he volunteered to go to Okinawa. But that wasn't necessary.

 

My father did not volunteer to be in the U.S. Army. He was drafted into the US Army because he was an American citizen. He didn't expect any special attention or recognition because he was serving his country because he was an American and expected to do his part in his role of being an American citizen.

 

No one ever thanked him for his service. He didn't have any special license plates on his car or any other kind of recognition in public to brag about serving his country in World War 2 in the European theater.

 

His family was proud of him. But he was no different from so many other men who had done the same thing during World War II and the Korean War and the Vietnam War.

 

He didn't join the Army because he was going to get bonus money or because he thought he could get a free college education.

 

He was drafted and he served because it was his duty to do so as an American citizen.

 

But he later told me that he wanted to go to protect his family and our country against Hitler's Fascist 3rd Reich of hatred and racism.

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To me a hero meant someone who

had gone beyond the usual and done extraordinary things.

I consider my parents (as well as many other people I know) to be heroes. My father was a WW II vet, but putting that aside, somehow he and my mother managed to raise two kids, stay out of debt, and provide for our basic needs. I would consider that both of them went beyond the usual and did some extraordinary things. Heroes can be everyday people ... you just need to look around sometimes.

 

I know there are several veterans on these boards, so Happy Veteran's Day to them. I was traveling yesterday, so I apologize for getting to the party a day late.

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I consider my parents (as well as many other people I know) to be heroes. My father was a WW II vet, but putting that aside, somehow he and my mother managed to raise two kids, stay out of debt, and provide for our basic needs. I would consider that both of them went beyond the usual and did some extraordinary things. Heroes can be everyday people ... you just need to look around sometimes.

 

I know there are several veterans on these boards, so Happy Veteran's Day to them. I was traveling yesterday, so I apologize for getting to the party a day late.

I'm sure that many people think of their parents as heroes in one way

or another and understandably so. I was referring specifically to how

that word is used in a military context and how widespread it has become,

where everyone who ever served in the military is a hero. The WW II

generation has caught up somewhat with today's spirit of self-congratulation

with their caps and tee shirts and celebrations, etc. I don't blame them,

that's part of modern society and they deserve that recognition.

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Your current discussion interests me, as a vet who always finds it awkward when someone finds out I served and promptly thanks me "for my service."  I try to gently say something to the effect that it's combat vets who really deserve our gratitude, as my military career never put me in such danger. 

 

Sure, there was some patriotism involved in my initial decision to enlist, but making it a career was more pragmatic.  It definitely was my ticket out of my small Rust Belt town that was already in decline when I left, and for that I was most grateful. 

 

As Dargo indicated, our WWII vets were usually reticent about discussing any of their wartime experiences.

 

This whole "thank you for your service" is a fairly recent phenomenon, one I hope will soon fade into oblivion.

 

Ya know Belle, this last observation of yours could most likely be attributed to a form of social "compensation effect", and a reaction(some might say "overreaction") to the generally shabbier treatment many returning Vietnam veterans were subjected to following that conflict and as compared to the returning WWII vets.

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I'm sure that many people think of their parents as heroes in one way

or another and understandably so. I was referring specifically to how

that word is used in a military context and how widespread it has become,

where everyone who ever served in the military is a hero. The WW II

generation has caught up somewhat with today's spirit of self-congratulation

with their caps and tee shirts and celebrations, etc. I don't blame them,

that's part of modern society and they deserve that recognition.

 

So Vautrin, you're basically saying here that EVEN those still around from the WWII generation might have forgotten Tom Landry's admonition about what to do and how to act once one gets into the end zone, TOO???!!!

 

(...say it ain't so, dude...I'd REALLY like to keep the thought that at least THAT generation was the LAST one to actually know what the term "class" meant, IF you don't mind!) ;)

 

LOL

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Veterans Day should also remind you to contact your senators and representatives and tell them to make sure our men and women who served and are serving will be taken care of and afforded the benefits and privileges promised to them. The fact that Congress needs reminding is sad enough.

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