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Gay joking in straight classics

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In "Algiers", Charles Boyer as Pepe Le Moko seems quite torn between "the man in his life", Pierrot (who is played by Johnny Downs) and "the lady in his life", Gaby (who is played by Hedy Lamarr).

 

Is it some sort of dark, dark joke that Pepe Le Moko loses both of them?

 

In other words, stray if you will - a younger man, a lady about to be married - but you will pay a high, high price.

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In "Algiers", Charles Boyer as Pepe Le Moko seems quite torn between "the man in his life", Pierrot (who is played by Johnny Downs) and "the lady in his life", Gaby (who is played by Hedy Lamarr).

 

Is it some sort of dark, dark joke that Pepe Le Moko loses both of them?

 

It might just be dramatic irony, which in turn seems like a twisted joke.

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Pepe Le Moko hoping that his beloved Pierrot (who is dying) will shoot the snitch who caused him his life - this kind of charged drama just doesn't happen that often on the screen - love, death, retribution all rolled into one multi-layered incident in the lives of two close friends -

  400px-Algiers_2.jpg

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Interesting...

 

Was Dr. No a gay man?

 

Joseph Wiseman's riveting performance suggests a monomanical madman with a great deal of suppressed homosexuality.

 

And his lifestyle on Crab Island is certainly that of a gay man.

 

In the dinner party scene, Dr. No can't get rid of Honey Badger fast enough - and then he tells his henchmen to "soften" James Bond up.

 

What other assaults on Mr. Bond's masculinity did he intend?

 

It's a tantalizing thought.

 

Dr.%2BNo.png

I was just watching this and yes Dr No might have been gay-( or at least bi curious)  even before the dinner scene- he sneaks into Bond's room and ogles the sleeping agent ( perhaps he was having a flash back to scene in which the tarantula crawls over Connery's perfect chest) - after he suggest his henchmen "soften" Bond up- James wakes up face down on the cell?! ( Hmm I wonder what kind of treatment he got from the henchmen)  T

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Is the little boy Patrick in the film version of "Auntie Mame" meant to be gay?

 

He does seem to be a rather refined-looking little boy.

 

And he is far too-loving for such a little boy.

 

Of course, he does grow up to be Roger Smith, who likes girls, marries and has a child of his own.

 

But the whole film has a barely-concealed gay sensibility.

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Is the little boy Patrick in the film version of "Auntie Mame" meant to be gay?

 

He does seem to be a rather refined-looking little boy.

 

And he is far too-loving for such a little boy.

 

Of course, he does grow up to be Roger Smith, who likes girls, marries and has a child of his own.

 

But the whole film has a barely-concealed gay sensibilit

 

If they remade this now- would Patrick comes to his senses and end up with some cute guy instead of that snooty girl? 

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Is the little boy Patrick in the film version of "Auntie Mame" meant to be gay?

 

He does seem to be a rather refined-looking little boy.

 

And he is far too-loving for such a little boy.

 

Of course, he does grow up to be Roger Smith, who likes girls, marries and has a child of his own.

 

But the whole film has a barely-concealed gay sensibility.

 

You remember when Little Patrick was taking notes with his notepad during his first party and asked her what "heterosexual" meant? She was quick to grab his notes.

 

Too bad Dwight Babcock was so furious about Little Patrick learning about gentlemen fishes doing what they are supposed to do with lady fish eggs that he was yanked out of school.

 

First Mame, then Dwight are concerned that Little Patrick might wind up... straight.

 

Ooooohhhh Auntie Mame. How I love that film. She and Beauregard Jackson Pickett Burnside sure had a weird relationship. She claims she married him for love, but there wasn't a whole lotta lovin' going on despite Norah Muldoon saying she's a "lovin' woman... if odd". Instead lots and lots of sight seeing on camels.

 

When Brian O'Banyon tried to make hot love with her later, she had to fight him off. She then made sure he was passed off onto Agnes Gooch who wound up "on the nest" instead. (Agnes gets into heterosexual "trouble" with Brian after Mame has her "coming out"... a clever play in words for the post gay liberation audience.)

 

 

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"Some Like It Hot" -

 

Joe E. Brown's lovable, elderly millionaire is so enamored of Jack Lemmon's Daphne - so willing to marry her with his mother's blessing - that he actually does not care that "Daphne" has been created by a man - and is a man - "Nobody's perfect", he says - the two of them are going to be a very loving couple, I think.

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"Some Like It Hot" -

 

Joe E. Brown's lovable, elderly millionaire is so enamored of Jack Lemmon's Daphne - so willing to marry her with his mother's blessing - that he actually does not care that "Daphne" has been created by a man - and is a man - "Nobody's perfect", he says - the two of them are going to be a very loving couple, I think.

A perfect movie farce and that final line is still shockingly true.

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There was a very amusing vignette in "Dancing Lady" with Joan Crawford and Clark Gable -

 

Sterling Hollloway was playing an obviously gay playwright, who was very emotional over the fact that his producers didn't like his book to the musical that was in the process of being rehearsed -

 

Sterling Holloway looked like he might explode at any second from the sheer stress of it all -

 

unfortunately, Clark Gable's character, the director, ended it all on a very sour note -

 

"We had a cousin like you.  We took him out and shot him."

 

I do wonder, however, if Clark Gable could have refused to say that line.

 

It is ssoo homophobic.

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There was a very amusing vignette in "Dancing Lady" with Joan Crawford and Clark Gable -

 

Sterling Hollloway was playing an obviously gay playwright, who was very emotional over the fact that his producers didn't like his book to the musical that was in the process of being rehearsed -

 

Sterling Holloway looked like he might explode at any second from the sheer stress of it all -

 

unfortunately, Clark Gable's character, the director, ended it all on a very sour note -

 

"We had a cousin like you.  We took him out and shot him."

 

I do wonder, however, if Clark Gable could have refused to say that line.

 

It is ssoo homophobic

It would depend on how he said the line

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Is Lovett( Edward Everet Horton)  in "Lost Horizon" gay or just gay coded? By the way I found the film boring specially once they get to Shagri -La and I don't blame George ( John Howard) for wanting to get back to civilization. 

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Is the character of Handel Fain, the part that Esme Percy plays in "Murder", meant to be a half-cast transvestite who has somehow captured the love of a young woman?

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In Hitchcok's "Shadow of a Doubt"- Herbie ( Hume Cronyn) lives with his mother and has a bromance with the father ( Henry Travers)  I wonder if he was created by gay writer Thorton Wilder?

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In Hitchcok's "Shadow of a Doubt"- Herbie ( Hume Cronyn) lives with his mother and has a bromance with the father ( Henry Travers)  I wonder if he was created by gay writer Thorton Wilder?

Sounds like a good probability.

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