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IanPatrickMovieReviews

"I'll Be Seeing You" 1944 Video Movie Review - Beautiful 4 Star Holiday Movie!

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Wow...just wow, guys! This movie completely blew me away! It is definitely one of my favorite movies now. Please watch this movie if you haven't!

 

I'm so happy I saw this at Christmas time...such a special movie, and I'm very thankful that I was able to watch it. It's perfect to watch at Christmas and New Year's. Enjoy the review and be sure to subscribe to me on YouTube for more reviews!

 


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Okay, my goal is to get to this one later in the morning...better late than never, right? I need to buy a hat like yours! :)

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Some comments--

 

Dieterle and Cotten were both under contract to Selznick. This was the only film Ginger Rogers did for Selznick. From what I read, Ginger had some arguments with the producer about the way her character was presented in the story.

 

Ginger had recently left home studio RKO, had a multi-picture deal at Paramount and was doing this project with Selznick's independent production company. The greatest source of contention was that Ginger was afraid Shirley Temple, a Selznick contract player at this point, would be favored with carefully lit and photographed close-ups in their scenes together. Ginger was pretty competitive when it came to her scenes and fiercely guarded her top-billing. Selznick had to reassure Ginger that she was indeed the star and that Shirley was supporting the leads. And it's interesting to note that up until this time, Shirley had usually been the lead star in all her films. 

 

Maltin bashes the film in his review..he calls it 'Overblown David Selznick schmaltz.' 

 

I think this was one of the first films that tackled the very real issue of post-traumatic stress disorder, experienced by soldiers.

 

I'LL BE SEEING YOU is airing tomorrow night on TCM, December 18th.

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Someone else created a thread about this film in the General Discussion forum when it aired on TCM on December 18th.

 

http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/71632-ill-be-seeing-you/

 

This is what I posted over there:

 

Ian Patrick reviewed this film on his thread in the Romance genre sub-forum. He gave it four stars and really liked it. If you check Maltin's review, he bashes the picture rather cold-heartedly (is there any other way to bash something?).

 

I think because Shirley did not do well at test screenings they changed the ending. Probably she was supposed to tell the soldier about Mary's secret out of malice-- but instead it was reworked as a teenaged blunder and she was then made to be contrite in her final scene, in order to mete out the proper penance. 

 

In a way, the part where we focus on Shirley, while Ginger's face is buried in a pillow, takes the story off-center. We don't really get a scene with Ginger leaving the house, so Spring Byington and Tom Tully's characters are just sidelined completely, as the focus is all on Shirley in that last-minute bedroom scene. Ginger was not pleased with Selznick's preoccupation with how Temple was presented, and she never worked with the producer again. 

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This one is a really beautiful film - about a man and a woman who are "at bay" in their lives - not really knowing where they are - and with very real problems, too - it is almost non-dramatic in terms of being "naturalistic" - it builds itself on blocks of atmosphere and mood.

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