LawrenceA

Top Ten Films of...

2,974 posts in this topic

1935 - 69 films seen

 

1. BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN

2. MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY

3. CAPTAIN BLOOD

4. TOP HAT

5. THE INFORMER

6. LES MISERABLES

7. CHINA SEAS

8. A NIGHT AT THE OPERA

9. A TALE OF TWO CITIES

10. THE 39 STEPS

 

 

Runner-ups: THE LIVES OF A BENGAL LANCER, DAVID COPPERFIELD, MAD LOVE, THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING, and "G" MEN.

 

A lot of literary adaptations this year, with a lot of costumes.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TopBilled, slow down! I'm trying to keep it to a year a day, so it doesn't get too congested. I appreciate your enthusiasm, but I'm just up to 1935 today.

Okay..LOL..earlier in the thread, I felt like I was behind. So I was trying to catch up. Now I'm ahead of the rest. :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Top, you've only got a few I don't know for these two years...CRAIG'S WIFE, THE PRESIDENT'S MYSTERY and HISTORY IS MADE AT NIGHT, ELEPHANT BOY, EVER SINCE EVE.

To be honest, EVER SINCE EVE (and SARATOGA which I also mentioned) are not great films per se, but they were the last ones of their respective stars-- Davies and Harlow-- and as such, I felt they deserved a tiny shout-out. 

 

THE PRESIDENT'S MYSTERY, believe it or not, is a Republic entry that was based on a short story suggested by President Roosevelt. It's actually very well made and is worth checking out.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_President%27s_Mystery

 

ELEPHANT BOY brought Sabu to the screen. CRAIG'S WIFE, which I have only seen aired once on TCM in the last five or six years, stars Rosalind Russell as a shrewish suburban wife. It was remade with Joan Crawford in the 50s and slightly retitled as HARRIET CRAIG. Both versions are great and would make a fine double-feature on TCM one evening. Hint-hint, programming department.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For 1935 - 65 films seen

 

1.  A Night at the Opera

2.  Triumph of the Will

3.  The Informer

4.  The Bride of Frankenstein

5.  Les Miserables

6.  Mutiny on the Bounty

7.  Anna Karenina

8.  David Copperfield

9.  The 39 Steps

10. The Lives of a Bengal Lancer

 

Here are some from my runner up list: The Story of Louis Pasteur, Hands Across the Table, Goin' to Town, Ruggles of Red Gap, Mad Love, Toni, La Kermesse Heroique, G-Men and The Man on the Flying Trapeze

 

For once, I have seen all of the same films that you have listed, Lawrence.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My current choices for performances for 1935 are:

 

Best Actor

 

The Marx Brothers, A Night at the Opera

 

Best Actress

 

Greta Garbo, Anna Karenina

 

Best Supporting Actor

 

Charles Laughton, Les Miserables

 

Best Supporting Actress

 

Margot Grahame, The Informer

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1935 - 69 films seen

 

1. BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN

2. MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY

3. CAPTAIN BLOOD

4. TOP HAT

5. THE INFORMER

6. LES MISERABLES

7. CHINA SEAS

8. A NIGHT AT THE OPERA

9. A TALE OF TWO CITIES

10. THE 39 STEPS

 

 

Runner-ups: THE LIVES OF A BENGAL LANCER, DAVID COPPERFIELD, MAD LOVE, THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING, and "G" MEN.

 

A lot of literary adaptations this year, with a lot of costumes.

I originally had THE INFORMER as an honorable mention, and it is quite good. I don't like A NIGHT AT THE OPERA as much as most people do, and I have never been able to pinpoint why. CHINA SEAS is one I used to think more highly of, but when I re-examined the film a year ago, I felt like all the leads were relying too much on stock characterizations and the script was too formulaic. Beery seems to overact more than usual, and the script almost requires him to do so, and that is why I do not entirely fault him. CAPTAIN BLOOD is enjoyable but a little too unpolished in spots. I think if it had been made a few years later when the leads were more mature, and in Technicolor, it would be more of a masterpiece.

 

I seem to have neglected the horror output for '35-- and I definitely like Lorre's central performance in MAD LOVE. I feel BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN is overrated, though I like it. As for THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING, the two leads are excellent, but I feel like the technology is not quite there yet to make the scenes believable where Robinson is talking to himself as the other character. It is obvious we have the same actor with a split screen, and it takes me out of the movie. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For 1935 - 65 films seen

 

1.  A Night at the Opera

2.  Triumph of the Will

3.  The Informer

4.  The Bride of Frankenstein

5.  Les Miserables

6.  Mutiny on the Bounty

7.  Anna Karenina

8.  David Copperfield

9.  The 39 Steps

10. The Lives of a Bengal Lancer

 

Here are some from my runner up list: The Story of Louis Pasteur, Hands Across the Table, Goin' to Town, Ruggles of Red Gap, Mad Love, Toni, La Kermesse Heroique, G-Men and The Man on the Flying Trapeze

 

For once, I have seen all of the same films that you have listed, Lawrence.

A lot here I don't know...HANDS ACROSS THE TABLE, TONI, GOIN TO TOWN, LA KERMESSE HEROIQUE, MAN ON THE FLYING TRAPEZE...I also haven't seen that version of ANNA KARENINA. So many titles to look for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot here I don't know...HANDS ACROSS THE TABLE, TONI, GOIN TO TOWN, LA KERMESSE HEROIQUE, MAN ON THE FLYING TRAPEZE...I also haven't seen that version of ANNA KARENINA. So many titles to look for.

The '35 version of ANNA KARENINA is in the TCM library so you can expect to see it sometime in the months ahead. Personally, the British version with Vivien Leigh from '48 is much better in my opinion. But see both of them, when you can.

 

HANDS ACROSS THE TABLE aired on TCM a few summers ago when Carole Lombard had a Summer Under the Stars tribute. It was the first of four she did with Fred MacMurray. She plays a manicurist, and third-billed Ralph Bellamy gets his hands done by her-- make of that what you will. LOL

 

GOIN' TO TOWN is classic Mae (as in West)...and MAN ON THE FLYING TRAPEZE is one of W.C. Fields' best during his tenure at Paramount. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I originally had THE INFORMER as an honorable mention, and it is quite good. I don't like A NIGHT AT THE OPERA as much as most people do, and I have never been able to pinpoint why. CHINA SEAS is one I used to think more highly of, but when I re-examined the film a year ago, I felt like all the leads were relying too much on stock characterizations and the script was too formulaic. Beery seems to overact more than usual, and the script almost requires him to do so, and that is why I do not entirely fault him. CAPTAIN BLOOD is enjoyable but a little too unpolished in spots. I think if it had been made a few years later when the leads were more mature, and in Technicolor, it would be more of a masterpiece.

 

I seem to have neglected the horror output for '35-- and I definitely like Lorre's central performance in MAD LOVE. I feel BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN is overrated, though I like it. As for THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING, the two leads are excellent, but I feel like the technology is not quite there yet to make the scenes believable where Robinson is talking to himself as the other character. It is obvious we have the same actor with a split screen, and it takes me out of the movie.

 

CHINA SEAS is actually the most recently viewed movie by me on this list. I know it's little more than a mostly-polished programmer, and Gable, Harlow and Beery are all playing their respective types. But I liked it. Sometimes the most routine films hit you just right way, and this was one for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CHINA SEAS is actually the most recently viewed movie by me on this list. I know it's little more than a mostly-polished programmer, and Gable, Harlow and Beery are all playing their respective types. But I liked it. Sometimes the most routine films hit you just right way, and this was one for me.

I think that is how it was for me in the beginning, when I had first seen it. But when I stack it up against TREASURE ISLAND and the countless other films where Beery is asked (expected) to ham it up, it just seems over-baked to me. And I love all three main stars but the MGM formula is no longer fresh at this point, and they are not pushing the performers to really stretch themselves with this kind of material.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1935

 

Here are my top ten, with a few comments:

 

Ah, Wilderness!  -- A joyous movie, based on Eugene O'Neill's only comedy. 

 
Bride of Frankenstein -- Brilliant, a work of art.
 
David Copperfield -- Great Dickens adaptation!
 
The Devil Is a Woman -- Dietrich's personal favorite of her films. I prefer it to Bunuel's film,
That Obscure Object of Desire, based on the same story.
 
The Mystery of Edwin Drood -- Stuart Walker made two great films in 1935, with some of the same actors. 
 
A Midsummer Night’s Dream -- Shakespeare meets Max Reinhardt. Gorgeous.
 
Mutiny on the Bounty -- Another brilliant 1935 adaptation of a novel. 
 
Peter Ibbetson -- A masterpiece of surrealism.
 
A Tale of Two Cities -- Perhaps my favorite Hollywood Dickens.
"Citizens -- Vote!," "I'm an Englishwoman, I'm your match!"
 
Werewolf of London -- My favorite of all the werewolf movies, another 1935 masterpiece by Stuart Walker. 
 
Mrs. Whack:  "Is your tripe tough, Mrs. Moncaster?"
Mrs. M:          "Not at all."
Mrs. W:          "Mine is."
Mrs M:           "It ain't tripe you're eating, it's your veil."
 
Pax vobiscum.
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The Devil Is a Woman -- Dietrich's personal favorite of her films. I prefer it to Bunuel's film,

That Obscure Object of Desire, based on the same story.
 

I haven't seen Bunuel's version. But yeah, the Dietrich one is a keeper.

 

Also glad you gave a shout-out to WEREWOLF OF LONDON-- highly atmospheric, superb cast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1935

 

1. The 39 Steps

2. Peter Ibbetson

3. Mad Love

4. The Informer

5. The Bride of Frankenstein

6. The Lives of a Bengal Lancer

7. Ruggles of Red Gap

8. Whipsaw

9. Charlie Chan in Paris

10. Sylvia Scarlett

11. The Whole Town's Talking

12. Toni

13. The Wedding Night

14. Mark of the Vampire

15. "G" Men

16. China Seas

17. Roberta

18. The Devil Is a Woman

19. Annie Oakley

20. Charlie Chan in Egypt

21. The Raven

22. Dangerous

23. Man of the Moment

24. She

25. Chandu on the Magic Island

26. Werewolf of London

27. The Murder Man

28. Les Miserables

29. Charlie Chan in Shanghai

30. Captain Blood

31. Hands Across the Table

32. The Gilded Lily

33. Barbary Coast

34. Wings in the Dark

35. Reckless

36. Steamboat Round the Bend

37. In Old Kentucky

38. Woman Wanted

39. Ah, Wilderness!

40. Break of Hearts

41. The Call of the Wild

42. Life Begins at Forty

43. The Good Fairy

44. Texas Terror

45. The Dawn Rider

46. Rendezvous

47. A Night at the Opera

48. Alice Adams

49. Top Hat

50. After Office Hours

51. If You Could Only Cook

52. A Tale of Two Cities

53. The Public Menace

54. The Mutiny on the Bounty

55. The Black Room

56. Westward Ho

57. David Copperfield

58. Doubting Thomas

59. Paradise Canyon

60. Rainbow Valley

61. Biography of a Bachelor Girl

62. Murder by Television

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1935

 

1. The 39 Steps

How can I have forgotten The 39 Steps, one of the all-time greats? I think I was working off an American list!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How can I have forgotten The 39 Steps, one of the all-time greats? I think I was working off an American list!

It's one of those films TCM rarely plays, so it tends to stay out of sight, out of mind. But it's such a good one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Screen%2Bshot%2B2015-12-16%2Bat%2B9.04.1

 

My list:

 

1. SAN FRANCISCO

2. LIBELED LADY

3. MY MAN GODFREY

4. DODSWORTH

5. THE STORY OF LOUIS PASTEUR

6. THE GREAT ZIEGFELD

7. CAMILLE

8. MR. DEEDS GOES TO TOWN

9. REMBRANDT

10. SHOW BOAT

 

Honorable Mentions: THEODORA GOES WILD; THE TRAIL OF THE LONESOME PINE; CRAIG'S WIFE; COME AND GET IT; MODERN TIMES; and THE PRESIDENT'S MYSTERY. 

 

I think the best performers of 1936 were: Irene Dunne; William Powell; Luise Rainer; Walter Huston; and Greta Garbo.

 

I think we're up to 1936 today. I was a day ahead when I posted this one yesterday. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite "shorties" of 1936...

 

...and a few I haven't seen but have read glowing reviews in Film Daily, Motion Picture Herald and other periodicals of the day so that they "should" be possible favorites of mine. Just sticking to US-produced films, although I could easily add some vintage George Pal and others as well.

 

(live-action)

 

1.) Disorder in the Court (Three Stooges)

Columbia- Preston Black / bw-17m / May 30

 

Everybody has seen this stooges flick

 

2.) The March of Time #3-4

Time, Inc.-RKO- Louis De Rochemont & Jack Glenn /  bw-15m / November 27

 

Typical "vintage" MOT, with segments: "A Soldier-King’s Son", "St. Lawrence Seaway" and "An Uncle Sam Production"

 

3.) Give Me Liberty (Technicolor Special)

Warner Bros. (Gordon Hollingshead, producer)- B. Reaves Eason & Forrest Barnes / c-21m / December 19

 

Featuring John Litel, Robert Warwick and Nedda Harrington recreating the times of Patrick Henry in Revolutionary America. Great color and great costume work.

 

4.) Free Rent (Tom Kennedy & Monte Collins)

Columbia- Del Lord / bw-20m / December 20

 

Antics with a mobile trailer that is a good representation of Columbia slapstick of the period

 

5.) Grand Slam Opera (Star Personality Comedy with Buster Keaton)

Educational (E.H. Allen, producer) & 20th Century Fox- Charles Lamont / bw-20m / February 21

 

Keaton's sound shorties never get respect, but this one deserves it

 

6.) Jimmie Lunceford and His Dance Orchestra (Melody Master)

Warner Bros.-Vitaphone Studio- Joseph Henabery / bw-10m / December 19

 

Because rhythm IS our business...

 

7.) Dummy Ache (Edgar Kennedy)

RKO- Leslie Goodwins / bw-18+m / July 10

 

Ed a.k.a. "Mister Average Man" thinks his wife Florence Lake is cheating on him and planning murder! Actually she is reciting a play, but you can see many future TV sitcoms owing their history back here. In addition to regulars Dot Farley and Jack Rice, we also see Harry Bowen, George Lewis, Lucille Ball (yup, her!) and Bobby Burns.

 

8.) Every Sunday (Tabloid Musical with Judy Garland & Deanna Durbin)

MGM- Felix E. Feist / bw-10m / December 9

 

The only time you will ever see these two together

 

9.) The Plow that Broke the Plains

Resettlement Administration Film Unit- Pare Lorenz / bw-28m / March 30

 

Among the few documentary shorts of the period to actually get shown in "Art of Film" classes, although a tad dull today

 

10.) Popular Science 5-4

Paramount (Jerry Fairbanks, producer)- Gayne Whitman (also narrator) / c (Cinecolor)-8m / March 27

 

Interesting segment here with Professor Jacobson researching earthquakes and use of model skyscrapers. Also radiography shown in Rochester (NY) and the usual kitchen "gadgets" that soon became a cliché with this series.

 

(animated)

 

1.) Popeye the Sailor Meets Sinbad the Sailor

Max Fleischer & Paramount- Dave Fleischer / c-17m / November 17

 

Quite the mini-epic pre-Snow White

 

2.) Thru The Mirror (Mickey Mouse)

Walt Disney & United Artists- David Hand / c-9m / May 30

 

One of Mickey's most charming films, with plenty of multiple card action predating ALICE IN WONDERLAND and a cute reference to "Calling All Cars" on the radio

 

3.) The Country Cousin (Silly Symphony)

Walt Disney & United Artists- Wilfred Jackson / c-8m / October 31

 

Great drunk scene animated by Art Babbitt. You know the tale of the country mouse and the city mouse...

 

4.) The Coo-Coo Nut Grove (Merrie Melody)

Len Schlesinger & Warner Bros.- Friz Freleng / c-7m / November 28

 

So many cartoons spoofed Hollywood celebrities, but this one with designs by T Hee is a particular hoot

 

5.) I-Ski Love-Ski You-Ski (Popeye)

Max Fleischer & Paramount- Dave Fleischer / bw-7m / April 3

 

Later Famous Studios repeated this cartoon and its "alpine" gags with Olive Oyle and Bluto

 

6.) Little Swee'Pea (Popeye)

Max Fleischer & Paramount- Dave Fleischer / bw-7m / September 25

 

Never let the brat loose in a zoo

 

7.) Christmas Comes But Once A Year (Color Classic)

Max Fleischer & Paramount- Dave Fleischer / c-8m / December 4

 

Awwwww... I love Grampy!

 

8.) Bottles (Happy Harmony)

Freleng-Ising & MGM- Hugh Harman / c-10m / January 11

 

Evil forces take over a pharmacy (?!). These Disney knock-offs of Harman & Ising are often quite odd, but the visuals are mighty pretty.

 

9.) It's a Greek Life (Rainbow Parade)

Amadee J. Van Beuren & RKO- Dan Gordon / c-7m / August 2

 

Not too many toons spoof the classical age.. and with ducks involved.

 

10.) Puppet Show (Oswald)

Walter Lantz & Universal / bw-8m / November 2

 

Mostly live-action with our cartoon rabbit shown "pulling the strings" but a fascinating little piece

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1936 - 71 films seen

 

1. MODERN TIMES

2. MR. DEEDS GOES TO TOWN

3. THINGS TO COME

4. MY MAN GODFREY

5. SWING TIME

6. CESAR

7. FURY

8. SAN FRANCISCO

9. SABOTAGE

10. DODSWORTH

 

Runner-ups: THE LOWER DEPTHS, WIFE VS SECRETARY, THE INVISIBLE RAY, BULLETS OR BALLOTS, and THE GREAT ZIEGFELD

 

 

Spencer Tracy, Myrna Loy, William Powell, and Sylvia Sidney appear to be my stars of the year. I know SABOTAGE is generally thought of as sub-standard Hitchcock, but I liked it, especially Sidney's performance. CESAR finished out the FANNY trilogy satisfactorily. DODSWORTH is really just a high-end soap, but I always like Walter Huston, and this is one of his better roles. THINGS TO COME is a very important film in the history of SF, and it's influence on virtually every other SF film made afterward is evident. The post-apocalyptic section prefigures everything from hit tv show "The Walking Dead" to this year's MAD MAX: FURY ROAD.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For 1936 - 79 films seen

 

1.  Modern Times

2.  Our Relations

3.  Dodsworth

4.  The Man Who Could Work Miracles

5.  The Petrified Forest

6.  Rembrandt

7.  The Great Ziegfeld

8.  My Man Godfrey

9.  After the Thin Man

10. Romeo and Juliet

 

Here are some from my runner up list: Libeled Lady, These Three, The Golem, Sabotage, Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, The Lower Depths, A Day In the Country, and Camille.

 

I haven't seen Cesar as yet but do have a copy of this Fanny trilogy.

 

As in many a year the gulf in quality between first place and the rest of the field is enormous in my view.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My current choices for performances for 1936 are:

 

Best Actor

 

Charles Chaplin, Modern Times

 

Best Actress

 

Greta Garbo, Camille

 

Best Supporting Actor

 

Walter Brennan, Come and Get It

 

Best Supporting Actress

 

Alma Kruger, These Three

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For 1936 - 79 films seen

 

1.  Modern Times

2.  Our Relations

3.  Dodsworth

4.  The Man Who Could Work Miracles

5.  The Petrified Forest

6.  Rembrandt

7.  The Great Ziegfeld

8.  My Man Godfrey

9.  After the Thin Man

10. Romeo and Juliet

 

Here are some from my runner up list: Libeled Lady, These Three, The Golem, Sabotage, Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, The Lower Depths, A Day In the Country, and Camille.

 

I haven't seen Cesar as yet but do have a copy of this Fanny trilogy.

 

As in many a year the gulf in quality between first place and the rest of the field is enormous in my view.

 

THE GOLEM, OUR RELATIONS, THE MAN WHO COULD WORK MIRACLES, and REMBRANDT I haven't seen. I didn't know about any version of THE GOLEM except for the silent. LIBELED LADY and PETRIFIED FOREST could have been runner-ups for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THE GOLEM, OUR RELATIONS, THE MAN WHO COULD WORK MIRACLES, and REMBRANDT I haven't seen. I didn't know about any version of THE GOLEM except for the silent. LIBELED LADY and PETRIFIED FOREST could have been runner-ups for me.

You'll love REMBRANDT. I don't know one person who hasn't enjoyed that film. It's very well-made. 

 

I am glad you mentioned FURY in your list, because I had unintentionally omitted said title. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel ssssssoooooo awful to admit this, but I never could get "into" CAMILLE. Garbo has the best performance in it, but something about that film just... didn't... do it for me. Even after watching it twice. I feel so guilty because EVERYBODY loves it.

 

My favorite Garbos are probably FLESH AND THE DEVIL, ANNA CHRISTIE, QUEEN CHRISTINA, NINOTCHKA... and, with guilty pleasure, MATA HARI because of the way she dominates poor Ramon Novarro into submission... to the point that your jaw can't stop dropping.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel ssssssoooooo awful to admit this, but I never could get "into" CAMILLE. Garbo has the best performance in it, but something about that film just... didn't... do it for me. Even after watching it twice. I feel so guilty because EVERYBODY loves it.

 

My favorite Garbos are probably FLESH AND THE DEVIL, ANNA CHRISTIE, QUEEN CHRISTINA, NINOTCHKA... and, with guilty pleasure, MATA HARI because of the way she dominates poor Ramon Novarro into submission... to the point that your jaw can't stop dropping.

The way you feel about CAMILLE is the way I feel about NINOTCHKA. I never found it very good, and then when everyone else was on the Garbo Laughs bandwagon, I gave it another try. I still didn't care much for it. In fact, I like her follow-up comedy, the much-maligned TWO-FACED WOMAN better than NINOTCHKA.

 

But overall, Garbo is hit-or-miss for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THE GOLEM, OUR RELATIONS, THE MAN WHO COULD WORK MIRACLES, and REMBRANDT I haven't seen. I didn't know about any version of THE GOLEM except for the silent. LIBELED LADY and PETRIFIED FOREST could have been runner-ups for me.

 

The Golem (1936) is by that very good French director, Julien Duvivier and has a great performance by Harry Baur.   I'm tracking down a number of Baur's films.  Check out his bio on the imdb.  Quite a life and death which may have been at the hands of the Gestapo.  He was known as the French Emil Jannings because of his 'large' performances.  His Les Miserables trilogy (1934) is only recently out on Blu Ray.  He would be a great choice for a SUTS spotlight.

 

Our Relations (1936) is my favourite Laurel & Hardy film.  Two sets of mis-matched twins provide lots of fun.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us