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Any Gary Cooper Fans?

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Bonjour, Senta-cherie! Comment-allez vous? How I envy you getting to travel to Paris. :)

 

Of course I thought of you and The Fountainhead. It's you and me....and maybe Frank if he would stop being so cagey about what he thought of it. :P

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Hi All,

 

Below is a post I just posted over at Home Theater forum on my disappointment with Criterion and their selection of releases. I am sure it will go over better here than with all them film crititics over there. I am not ashamed to align myself from this day forward as being the biggest fan of hopless romantic movies. This is what I consider to be the greatest movies ever made and the best one's are from the 30's and 40's starting with Peter Ibbetson.



I don't think anyone that works at Criterion has any interest in any of the movies I consider classic that are in public domain status. I mean what the heck is a Perot Le Fou or a Walker. It is quite obvious they stay away from Gary Cooper movies with a ten foot pole when they could have made a ton of money releasing a restored A Farewell to Arms or Meet John Doe. The only movie I own from them is Charade with Grant and Hepburn and they won't be getting any more money from me until they show me interest with other titles. With all the dreadful transfers of the public domain title Penny Serenade ussually included on on the same disc as Charade from other companies, I think it is about time to look into releasing that movie as well or does Criterian hold a predudice against releasing classic romantic tearjerkers? I mean these are the type of movies I consider the best with movies like Random Harvest alrady out on dvd, Waterloo Bridge (1940), A Farewell To Arms (1932), Penny Serenade, In Name Only ect ect. Or course with Criterion staying clear of these types of movies, I am sure that any fans of Criterion that will be the only one's reading this post probably consider these the worst movies ever made since they are not into the classic romantic movies. Yet I can assure you that there is myself and probably a hundred thousand housewives that consider movies like Penny Serenade more classic than any Hitchcock movie or any of the movies mentioned for Feb releases.

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Very well said, Dan; I'm with you all the way.

Did you receive any responses from them; or had you only sent it moments ago?

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Hi, Dan! -- Nice to see you around again.

 

I think there are a few Coop films that would work well as Criterion DVDs with Frank Capra's Meet John Doe being one of them. It's a strong social commentary film. Anthony Mann's Man of the West is another title that would definitely fit the bill. Another one of Anthony Mann's films is expected to have a Criterion release later this year, The Furies.

 

I haven't watched enough Criterion DVDs to know how many hopeless romantic films they have in their catalogue. Ernst Lubitsch's films may have a strong hopeless romantic undercurrent to them. The Lady Eve is a romantic comedy that's on Criterion.

 

What I love about Criterion is that they offer a wide variety of the world's greatest films and filmmakers. I would love to see all of the films in their catalogue. I believe it would be one of the greatest film experiences one could have via DVD. I just like experiencing different kinds of cultures and the feelings and emotions they can bring out of us. I don't like limiting myself. If I did, I wouldn't be watching Gary Cooper films right now and this would have prevented me from finding my favorite Coop film to date, Peter Ibbetson. I believe it's best to expand one's universe, not shrink it.

 

The next film I'm going to watch is Random Harvest. I'm a Hitchcock, Lang, Murnau, film noir guy... not a housewife. So why the heck would I want to watch Random Harvest? Because I really like Theresa. Random Harvest is one of her favorite films and it stars her favorite actress, Greer Garson. I'm stepping outside of my world to touch hers.

 

Angie told me recently that Dallas is one of her favorite Coop films. That will be the next Coop film that I'll watch because I really like Ang.

 

I just watched Morocco and Rio Grande because I care about another silly, LITTLE mess around here. I'm going to watch Gone with the Wind (favorite film of all time), My Man Godfrey (favorite comedy of all time), How Green Was My Valley (favorite Ford non-western; maybe overall), and many other Ford titles because they are her favorite films.

 

I'd watch a "Kim" film but she has horrible taste. Danny Kaye? Blech! :P Did anyone say Ginger Rogers? :)

 

I will always be a Hitchcock, Lang, Murnau, film noir guy but I'm going to try to be one with a broader mind and broader shoulders.

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*Random Harvest* has become one of my all time favorite films. Me and Theresa are gonna watch it together this weekend and that should be fun and sad all at the same time :).

 

I can also highly recommend *GWTW* and *My Man Godrey* the latter which I just recently saw. I've seen a lot of William Powell's films and I don't think he made any bad ones. Carole Lombard is also adorably crazy in that one.

 

*Dallas* is just a fun Western, not as serious as *High Noon* but not a comedy like *Along Came Jones*. It's inbetween I guess.

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Hi, ButterscotchGreer! -- my puppy dog eyes are gonna come out soon!!! heehee! you better watch it frankie, my puppy dog eyes are on you! heehee!

 

I didn't know puppy dog eyes could fire such glares. You didn't get the "cold shoulder" memo, did you? :P

 

Привет, Senta! -- It's always nice to "see" you. I hope you continue to post here.

 

Howdy, Miss G! -- Wait! Senta said she liked it so I'm not the only one.

 

That's right. Don't you forget about Senta.

 

It's you and me....and maybe Frank if he would stop being so cagey about what he thought of it.

 

Cagey? Me? I thought I wasn't good at that. :P

 

And don't worry, we ladies can be patient--with people who actually DO keep their promises.

 

generaldiedatdawn20.jpg

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Hey, Coopsy's Grunge Girl -- Random Harvest has become one of my all time favorite films. Me and Theresa are gonna watch it together this weekend and that should be fun and sad all at the same time.

 

Oh, so you must have got your "Greer" flu shot today.

 

I can also highly recommend GWTW and My Man Godrey the latter which I just recently saw. I've seen a lot of William Powell's films and I don't think he made any bad ones.

 

Highly recommend? Did I say I was going to watch those two films? I meant to say A Clockwork Orange and Last Tango in Paris. They're also favorites of silly LITTLE girls.

 

Carole Lombard is also adorably crazy in that one.

 

I LOVE adorably crazy dames.

 

Dallas is just a fun Western, not as serious as High Noon but not a comedy like Along Came Jones. It's inbetween I guess.

 

Are you trying to prepare me for disappointment?

 

generaldiedatdawn21.jpg

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*I meant to say A Clockwork Orange and Last Tango in Paris.*

 

I can't recommend those since you couldn't pay me to watch 'em.

 

*Are you trying to prepare me for disappointment?*

 

No, but I've read some reviews of that one on other sites and most people aren't real impressed with it. I like it though; it's got a good story, good acting and it's set in Texas so there ya go!

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I meant to say A Clockwork Orange and Last Tango in Paris.

 

I can't recommend those since you couldn't pay me to watch 'em.

 

:D

 

No, but I've read some reviews of that one on other sites and most people aren't real impressed with it. I like it though; it's got a good story, good acting and it's set in Texas so there ya go!

 

I don't have high hopes for Dallas, but I'm someone who usually finds something of value in a film. Cloak and Dagger was like this for me. I didn't expect the film to be that good but I ended up loving the romance in the film. It's definitely the most romantic Fritz Lang film I have seen to date. So even though I rank Cloak and Dagger lower on my Lang and Coop list, I still appreciate it.

 

Design for Living is a Coop film I have higher hopes for because of Lubitsch. Another Coop film I'm looking forward to watching is Springfield Rifle. Love in the Afternoon is a Coop film I'm thinking about buying because it's Billy Wilder. I'm very curious about that film.

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*I'd watch a "Kim" film but she has horrible taste. Danny Kaye? Blech! :P Did anyone say Ginger Rogers?*

 

At least you didn't mention a musical; I'd sock you a pretty one, Frankie! :)

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*Design for Living is a Coop film I have higher hopes for because of Lubitsch.*

 

I think I've only watched that one a couple of times. It's good, but not one of my faves.

 

*Springfield Rifle* and *Dallas* are kind of similar (at least to me). The stories are different but they are similar types of movies and I watched them back to back for the first time so I just associate those two together. They are both fun and enjoyable films.

 

I loooooove *Love in the Afternoon*. I like Audrey Hepburn better in her '50s movies and it's a real cute romantic comedy.

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At least you didn't mention a musical; I'd sock you a pretty one, Frankie!

 

For a girl who fools around with curtains, you sure are a tough cookie. At least you

said it was going to be a "pretty" one.

 

I wonder if Ginger Rogers ever appeared in a musical. :P

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Design for Living is a Coop film I have higher hopes for because of Lubitsch.

 

I think I've only watched that one a couple of times. It's good, but not one of my faves.

 

I've only watched one Lubitsch film thus far and I got socked a "pretty one" for it. I have three Lubitsch films on DVD and tape now.

 

Springfield Rifle and Dallas are kind of similar (at least to me). The stories are different but they are similar types of movies and I watched them back to back for the first time so I just associate those two together. They are both fun and enjoyable films.

 

That makes sense. The write-up on Springfield Rifle intrigues me.

 

I loooooove Love in the Afternoon. I like Audrey Hepburn better in her '50s movies and it's a real cute romantic comedy.

 

I've only seen two Audrey films and I like them both, Charade and Wait Until Dark. "Reggie" is one of my favorite female characters in film. I love her sneaky curiosity. Breakfast at Tiffany's will be the next Audrey film that I watch.

 

breakfastattiffanys2.jpg

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For a girl who fools around with curtains, you sure are a tough cookie. At least you said it was going to be a "pretty" one

 

Curtain molesters are often teased mercilessly; one must be tough to fend off such 'meanies'. ;)

 

 

*I wonder if Ginger Rogers ever appeared in a musical.*

 

You're treading on mighty thin water there, amigo; but **grits teeth** she did play in a musical. Excuse me while I go disgorge...

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Curtain molesters are often teased mercilessly;

 

And rightly so.

 

one must be tough to fend off such 'meanies'.

 

I see. Did you learn how to fend off "meanies" by watching Danny Kaye films?

 

I wonder if Ginger Rogers ever appeared in a musical.

 

You're treading on mighty thin water there, amigo; but **grits teeth** she did play in a musical. Excuse me while I go disgorge...

 

Disgorge? Don't tell me you're sick, too.

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*I see. Did you learn how to fend off "meanies" by watching Danny Kaye films?*

 

Indeed I did. He taught me to use insanity to my advantage.

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What I love about Criterion is that they offer a wide variety of the world's greatest films and filmmakers. I would love to see all of the films in their catalogue.



Not me Frank. I would say that I would stay clear of 99 percent of all Criterion movies that are currenly out. I don't know what directors directed what except for a few Howard Hawks and William Wyler movies. I'm not a director kind of guy or one into fancy film angles or flashy women. The movies regardless of who directed them and I would have to look them up to find out on movies like A Farewell To Arms, Penny Serenade and In Name Only are of a different type of romance than those romantic comedies you speak of. There is huge emotional outpourings in the movies that I consider great that cause huge outpourings of emotion and tears when watching them that fancy Hitchcock movies and film noirs simply don't do it for me. If you do watch Random Harvest, you will get a taste of it but if you are anything like me, which you are probably not, it will only want you longing for more of the same thing. My goal is to record and watch every single serious gut wrenching romantic movie made in the 30's and 40's. You know I can't even think of who directed Random Harvest but then I don't even know who directed Casablanca. Oh well it doesn't really matter as it is the story and the actors that all that are important. I would think that the screenwriter is far more important than a director. If you ever get a chance to see Cary Grant in Penny Serenade and his pleading his case in front of the judge for the custody of his adopted baby, you will perhaps for the first time understand what true greatness in a movie is or what true greatness in an actor's performance is. It is on tcm 2/13/08 by the way. I would say that it is at least 25 times more gut wrenching than random harvest. So if you have a hard time with Random Harvest, I would stay clear of TCM on 2/13/08. Ok I looked it up and the directors name is George Stevens for Penny Serenade. I never heard of him. Oh well it doesn't make much of a difference with me. It also states that this movie was unlike any other movie that he directed, so I guess there will be no mad rush for me to go out and see all of the other movies that he directed any time soon. In the past I stayed clear of movies with sad endings or were very sad with a happy ending but now I am finding that they are the only movies that I can truely give a greatness tag to. Another movie that I would say was on the same greatness caliber as Random Harvest was In name Only starring Cary Grant and Carol Lombard.

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Hi, Keystone Dan -- Not me Frank. I would say that I would stay clear of 99 percent of all Criterion movies that are currenly out.

 

I can believe that. When I first got into film a few years ago, I looked at the Criterion catalog and I didn't see much that interested me. I'm now at the other end of the spectrum. I'd love to see the vast majority of their catalog. I'm a curious film watcher. FYI, Charade was one of the very few films that interested me at first.

 

I don't know what directors directed what except for a few Howard Hawks and William Wyler movies. I'm not a director kind of guy or one into fancy film angles or flashy women.

 

Most moviegoers don't know who directs their favorite films and many of those who post on this board are unaware of directors. I'm clearly in the minority around here, although there's been an awakening in some. A gorgeous awakening.

 

I love creative shots in films, so we are definitely on different sides of the fence there.

 

I love flashy women, especially ones who wear leopard pattern coats and high heels. :P Actually, I think Carole Lombard is a very flashy woman. Her personality is electric.

 

There is huge emotional outpourings in the movies that I consider great that cause huge outpourings of emotion and tears when watching them that fancy Hitchcock movies and film noirs simply don't do it for me.

 

That's understandable. I don't think I have ever teared up while watching a Hitch film and I've only teared up a couple times in film noir (They Live by Night and Pickup on South Street.) But I want to have some variety in my film watching. I like all kinds of films that elicit all kinds of feelings. I don't always seek love or sadness or comedy from every film. My emotional range reaches further than that.

 

If you do watch Random Harvest,

 

Why is it that I feel the glare of Theresa's puppy dog eyes right now?

 

you will get a taste of it but if you are anything like me, which you are probably not, it will only want you longing for more of the same thing.

 

You and I are most definitely different, but not altogether. And I'm someone who doesn't like to focus on the differences I have with a person. I prefer to focus on the similarities. This flashy woman lover, Hitchcock/noir guy lists Peter Ibbetson as his favorite Coop film. None of the Coop Gals even do that. I'll even tip my hand right now and tell you that Morocco is #3 for me. I love the film ( ;) ) . Why? True love. I'm an absolute sucker for true love. The kind of love that gets deep inside of you. Morocco is a love letter to fools like me.

 

The "more of the same thing" that I seek is entertainment. My reasons for liking High Noon and Morocco are completely different, but I enjoy them just the same. They entertain me on different levels.

 

You know I can't even think of who directed Random Harvest but then I don't even know who directed Casablanca. Oh well it doesn't really matter as it is the story and the actors that all that are important. I would think that the screenwriter is far more important than a director.

 

All films are different. Sometimes it's the performers that matter most. Sometimes it's the story and dialogue. Sometimes it's the cinematography (atmosphere). Sometimes it's the direction. Sometimes it's the music. The greatest films feature most or all of the above.

 

I'm someone who firmly believes that the director can be the most important factor in the making of a film. More tipping hand here: all you need to do is watch some John Ford films and you will know what I'm talking about. ;) I hate myself now.

 

If you ever get a chance to see Cary Grant in Penny Serenade and his pleading his case in front of the judge for the custody of his adopted baby, you will perhaps for the first time understand what true greatness in a movie is or what true greatness in an actor's performance is.

 

I've been moved by quite a few great performances and great films throughout my film-watching lifetime. The performances range from the comedic to the dramatic to the romantic to the psychotic. All of them great in their own way. The same can be said for the films.

 

It is on tcm 2/13/08 by the way.

 

I'll definitely tape it. Cary Grant is my second favorite actor and I haven't seen that film yet. My all-time favorite character in film is Geoff Carter from Only Angels Have Wings and if I could choose one actor who I wish I could be, it's Cary. I'm also curious to see more of Irene Dunne's films because I like The Awful Truth.

 

I would say that it is at least 25 times more gut wrenching than random harvest. So if you have a hard time with Random Harvest, I would stay clear of TCM on 2/13/08.

 

I'm sure I'll be able to handle Random Harvest. If I ever get to it. :D

 

Ok I looked it up and the directors name is George Stevens for Penny Serenade. I never heard of him. Oh well it doesn't make much of a difference with me. It also states that this movie was unlike any other movie that he directed, so I guess there will be no mad rush for me to go out and see all of the other movies that he directed any time soon.

 

I've only seen one George Stevens film in its entirety, A Place in the Sun, which I like. I've seen some of Shane and I have The Talk of the Town on DVD but I've yet to get to it. Gunga Din is on my DVD wish list and Giant is the Stevens film I wish to see most.

 

In the past I stayed clear of movies with sad endings or were very sad with a happy ending but now I am finding that they are the only movies that I can truely give a greatness tag to.

 

Whatever brings you joy, Dan. I think all of the Coop Gals fast-forward past sad endings or just turn off the DVD player. Some of them have the nerve to write their own epilogues. Mrs. Scarlett Butler? Uh-huh. Complicated women... indeed.

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I can believe that. When I first got into film a few years ago, I looked at the Criterion catalog and I didn't see much that interested me. I'm now at the other end of the spectrum. I'd love to see the vast majority of their catalog. I'm a curious film watcher. FYI, Charade was one of the very few films that interested me at first.



Charade was a great film and probably better than any film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, but it is still quite far down on my radar of great films. It is probably around 25 or so. Penny Serenade on the other hand is at like number 4 I think for my favorite movies of all time. I can see why you would like them with a large selection of film noir type movies and such but they still have yet to release a single Gary Cooper movie. You are more aligned with Criterion than I will ever be just being a film noir type person. You would probably get along great with the Home Theature Forum threads. Every month or so they come out with some big announcement of the Criterion for Feb and list movies like Pierro Le FOU and Walker and everyone gets all excited and state things like they've been waiting for years for these movies. I've never heard of the movies nor the actors. I am fairly narrowminded in my movie tastes. I watch different actors and actresses who had to have started in the 30's or early 40's and then go on to watch more of what they done if I like them. I don't even like actors that started in the 50's or 60's and only watch them if they happen to be in movies from actors or actresses that started in the 20's, 30's or early 40's. The only way I'll even watch a movie in the 50's or 60's is if it has an actor or actress that started in the 30's or early 40's happens to be in a 50's or 60's movie. These are my rules that I have set for myself and have still managed to record and buy on dvd over 500 classic movies that I will someday get around to watching them all with about 100 more stated to record and transfer over to dvd-r off of tcm in the next few months. As for branching out, I think I am doing quite good with just ordering the Joan Crawford box set Vol 2. She did have some great films in the 30's. One with Gary Cooper, one with Spencer tracy and a host of movies with Clark Gable.



Most moviegoers don't know who directs their favorite films and many of those who post on this board are unaware of directors. I'm clearly in the minority around here, although there's been an awakening in some. A gorgeous awakening.

 

I love creative shots in films, so we are definitely on different sides of the fence there.

 

I love flashy women, especially ones who wear leopard pattern coats and high heels. Actually, I think Carole Lombard is a very flashy woman. Her personality is electric.



I think most film Noir fans I have chatted with are director over movie actor type people. My guess on this would be that bigger named actors didn't get as involved in film noir type movies and there are a great deal more actors and actresses to watch if one wants to watch and collect all the film noir that is out there. Film Noir people watch and collect movies for Film Noir sake and not for the actors or actresses that are in them as much. Film noir also involves more a camera angle and directors touch than the sappy romance movies I watch I would imagine. I do think that if I start collecting all the highly motivated romance movies to watch from the 30's and 40's I will be introduced to a broader actor and actress crew but I certainly am not going to become a huge film noir person. Carole Lombard was not flashy at all in the Cary Grant movie "In Name Only" and it is my favorite movie of hers. I never really thought about it but that may be a contributing factor as to why it is my favorite movie of hers. I certainly don't like flashy women with maybe a slight exception to Jean Harlow as her acting won me over. Her absolute best role was also a none flashy one where she played the good and honest secretary in Wife verse secretary. Yet she always seemed to have a heart of gold even in the more flawed roles with the exception of Red Headed women where she was just an awful person. She probably played a part that you would love though.



That's understandable. I don't think I have ever teared up while watching a Hitch film and I've only teared up a couple times in film noir (They Live by Night and Pickup on South Street.) But I want to have some variety in my film watching. I like all kinds of films that elicit all kinds of feelings. I don't always seek love or sadness or comedy from every film. My emotional range reaches further than that.



I love comedies, hichcock type suspense movies, war movies, westerns (not so much lately) and others but right now my interest seems to be highest in romance tear jerkers. I didn't want it to sound like I ruled out all other types of movies but at this time in my life I just can't get enough of the really hard core romance movies. Peter Ibetson is ussually ranked at number 2 or 3 for my favorite Gary Cooper movies and favorite movies of all time of which the first 3 or so just happen to be the same for favorite GC movies and favorite movies of all time. Random harvest, In Name Only, Penny Serenade, and comedies like Libeled Lady would all make my top ten list I think. Actually now that I think of it that movie is my favorite Jean Harlow movie.



You and I are most definitely different, but not altogether. And I'm someone who doesn't like to focus on the differences I have with a person. I prefer to focus on the similarities. This flashy woman lover, Hitchcock/noir guy lists Peter Ibbetson as his favorite Coop film. None of the Coop Gals even do that. I'll even tip my hand right now and tell you that Morocco is #3 for me. I love the film ( ) . Why? True love. I'm an absolute sucker for true love. The kind of love that gets deep inside of you. Morocco is a love letter to fools like me.



You should most definatly like Cary Grant and Irene Dunne in Penny Serenade and Cary Grant and Carole Lombard in "In Name Only" then if you like movies where the love gets deep inside you. I would also think that Gary Cooper in A farewell to Arms might be up your alley. To me I didn't get the sense of the love as much in Morocco as you did. Random Harvest will certainly become one of your favorite movies as soon as you see it.



All films are different. Sometimes it's the performers that matter most. Sometimes it's the story and dialogue. Sometimes it's the cinematography (atmosphere). Sometimes it's the direction. Sometimes it's the music. The greatest films feature most or all of the above.

 

I'm someone who firmly believes that the director can be the most important factor in the making of a film. More tipping hand here: all you need to do is watch some John Ford films and you will know what I'm talking about. I hate myself now.



Oh why did you have to go and bring up his name. I am familar with him and am more of a close up shot man and find directors like 90 take Willie (a true nickname to William Wyler) and I don't care if it takes all day to get this shot Howard Hawks more to my liking than lets take one shot and we are done Ford. He actually never took more than three shots and it showed. I can't speak for his movies with John Wayne as I won't watch any movies with the Duke in them. I still think the screenplay and the actors performances are the most critical aspect of the picture, which is the main reason but not the only reason I won't watch a John Wayne movie.



I've only seen one George Stevens film in its entirety, A Place in the Sun, which I like. I've seen some of Shane and I have The Talk of the Town on DVD but I've yet to get to it. Gunga Din is on my DVD wish list and Giant is the Stevens film I wish to see most.



I've seen all those movies but A Place in the sun. I didn't care for Shane at all and the annoying kid. Gunga Din was an alright movie for Cary Grant but would probabaly rank in the late 20's for my favorite movies of his and The Talk of the Town was a really good movie which is probably in my top 10 favorite Cary Grant's movies list. As the critics have stated though none of these movies is anything at all like Penny Serenade. Not even close. I would not have known he directed these other movies after watching Penny Serenade. Are you sure George Stevens directed those other movies as I think it must be a misprint. Actually I haven't seen Giant. I think that has Rock Hudson in it and I don't like his acting in any movie I have seen so I have no desire to see Giant. All I know about that movie is that it will in no way be like Penny Serenade and that is a shame. The world needs more movies like Penny Serenade.

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*I'm also curious to see more of Irene Dunne's films because I like The Awful Truth.*

 

She and Cary Grant made a good team and they were also very good together in *My Favorite Wife*. My fave movie of hers is *White Cliffs of Dover*. Now there's a tear jerking, gut wrenching romance film. Irene plays a young woman who goes to England on vacation with her Dad just before WWI and she not only falls in love with the country but with an English aristocrat as well. The rest of the story is about her family through both world wars and her enduring love for England.

 

This movie is very close to my heart as it seems I'm watching myself in Irene's character. I've had the good fortune to go to England twice (about 10 months all together spent there) and it's a wonderful place. For a while I considered living there permanently but I realized I would miss my family too much. I definitly love America (Texas in particular) over all other places but if I had to choose another country it would be England. As a souvenir I brought home a piece of limestone I got from the white cliffs of Dover so I can touch England anytime I want :).

 

*Actually, I think Carole Lombard is a very flashy woman. Her personality is electric.*

 

What I like best about her is that despite her glamorous movie star image, she was just a regular girl who liked to tell dirty jokes with the boys and just mess around. She seems like someone who would have been fun to be around and she was a very good actress as well. Like Dan said, her performance in *In Name Only* is top notch.

 

*I think all of the Coop Gals fast-forward past sad endings or just turn off the DVD player. Some of* *them have the nerve to write their own epilogues.*

 

Hey, there are only 3 movies of Gary's that I have to fast-forward through. I can't watch the end of *They Came to Cordura* b/c it's just too brutal. I saw it once and that was enough - ha! I have to "ff" through one part of *Bengal Lancers* when they are tortured and I also have to skip past part of *City Streets*; not b/c of anything bad happening to Gary, but b/c one part is just so unintentionally funny that I get cracked up and can't stop laughing.

 

You and Dan had an interesting discussion about what draws you to a movie. I used to focus mainly on who was in it, but not so much anymore. I'll watch just about anything Capra did b/c he was so great at film-making. I definitely feel the director is important as it's their responsibility to keep everything running smoothly and to get the best performance out of the actors. You can have a good movie in spite of a bad director, but typically very good movies are good all the way around: great director, screenwriter, actors, sets, wardrobe, music, etc....

 

Robert Riskin, who was Capra's main screenwriter, is my fave in that area and I'll also watch just about anything if he wrote the script for it. Then you also have Val Lewton who was a producer and his movies are just wonderful even though they rarely had any name actors.

 

I think it was Dan who said he didn't know who directed *Casablanca*. It was Michael Curtiz. He's most famous for *Casablanca*, which I don't care for, but he made a lot of other ones that I just love including:

 

*Doctor X*

*Mystery of the Wax Museum* (these two are in 2-strip Technicolor)

*The Kennel Murder Case*

*The Adventures of Robin Hood* (Flynn version and also a beautiful early 3-strip color film)

*The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex*

*Bright Leaf* (with Gary)

 

Victor Fleming is another director who made a lot of films I really enjoy including:

 

*Mantrap*

*Hula* (these first two star Clara Bow around the time they were dating)

*Wolf Song* (one of Gary's lost silents that I'm sure I would love if I saw it ;) )

*The Virginian* (Gary's first all talkie)

*Bombshell*

*Reckless*

*Test Pilot*

*Wizard of Oz*

*Gone with the Wind*

 

I've branched out a lot since I really got into Gary's movies b/c through his films I have found a lot of the directors and actors/actresses that I now love. Of course there are some things I don't think I'll ever like. I love Gary's westerns and war films but in general those are two genres I'm not usually interested in. I like some comedy westerns like *Blazing Saddles* and *Shakiest Gun in the West*, but that's about all I'll watch in the genre that doesn't have Gary in it.

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Charade is great, but better than Hitchcock ?

Some yes, but not all...

Charade and Arsenic and Old Lace were 2 of the best movies I saw late last year

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I meant to say A Clockwork Orange and Last Tango in Paris.

 

I can't recommend those since you couldn't pay me to watch 'em.

 

See! Angie has GREAT taste and she knows better than to even mention those movies in the same breath as those masterpieces. :P

 

Are you trying to prepare me for disappointment?

 

No, but I've read some reviews of that one on other sites and most people aren't real impressed with it. I like it though; it's got a good story, good acting and it's set in Texas so there ya go!

 

*Dallas* is practically my hometown and it stars Gary Cooper so how can you go wrong. Don't answer that.

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All films are different. Sometimes it's the performers that matter most. Sometimes it's the story and dialogue. Sometimes it's the cinematography (atmosphere). Sometimes it's the direction. Sometimes it's the music. The greatest films feature most or all of the above.

 

You just described Gone With the Wind, so I guess you DID watch it.

 

I'm someone who firmly believes that the director can be the most important factor in the making of a film. More tipping hand here: all you need to do is watch some John Ford films and you will know what I'm talking about. I hate myself now.

 

Now who's kissing up? :P

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Just wanted to "hi" to you Dan and I love how you get interesting discussions going whenever you're around, which should be more often. ;) I agree with you about the merits of *Penny Serenade* and *In Name Only* and I do think it would be hard for anyone to resist those two movies. Penny contains one of Cary Grant's very best performances---he's all over the map emotionally in this one, even more so than Irene is. It's sweet the way he gets so wrapped up in his kid after initially being resistant to the idea of having a child at all (in real life he always wanted kids worse than anythind it ironically wasn't until he married the much younger Dyan Cannon and he was already in his sixties that he finally had a daughter, Jennifer. She was the apple of his eye). And Edgar Buchanan is wonderful in a supporting part. Brilliant and underrated gem. *In Name Only* is a very touching and winsome love story and gives Carole a chance to play it kind of "low key" and she does it very well. They have great timing and chemistry together.

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