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TawfikZone

Alternative Oscars Podcast 1950 and 1951

9 posts in this topic

Hi everybody,

 

Like many here, I've been following the #OscarsSoWhite controversy of the last couple of years with some interest. I've found the debate more interesting than most of the movies made by Hollywood today (I hope that nobody makes a Biopic on this, although I bet somebody will and it will be Oscar bait). 

 

Anyway, I find most movies today to be so boring that I've gone back and purged on the classics. To justify this, I've started a Podcast series called The Tawfik Zone's Alternative Oscars. Even though the films back then were usually better, I've found that I still stray from The Oscars' choices (hence the Alternative Oscars bit). 

 

Admittedly, our podcast is still a bit rough as we're still figuring out our rhythm, but I thought I'd go ahead and share our first two episodes:

 

1950 - http://tawfikzone.com/2015/10/16/podcast-alternative-oscars-episode-1-1950/

 

1951 - http://tawfikzone.com/2015/12/19/podcast-alternative-oscars-episode-2-1951/

 

What did you think of the Best Picture nominees of those years? What do you think of our Alternative Nominees? What would be your lineup for Alternative Oscars for the 1950 and 51 cycles? 

 

Is there anything we can do to improve our discussion? Any constructive feedback is appreciated. I hope you'll stay tuned for our 1952 entry which we aim to do mid- to late- February. 

 

Thanks,

 

Adam

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Hi everybody,

 

Like many here, I've been following the #OscarsSoWhite controversy of the last couple of years with some interest. I've found the debate more interesting than most of the movies made by Hollywood today (I hope that nobody makes a Biopic on this, although I bet somebody will and it will be Oscar bait). 

 

Anyway, I find most movies today to be so boring that I've gone back and purged on the classics. To justify this, I've started a Podcast series called The Tawfik Zone's Alternative Oscars. Even though the films back then were usually better, I've found that I still stray from The Oscars' choices (hence the Alternative Oscars bit). 

 

Admittedly, our podcast is still a bit rough as we're still figuring out our rhythm, but I thought I'd go ahead and share our first two episodes:

 

1950 - http://tawfikzone.com/2015/10/16/podcast-alternative-oscars-episode-1-1950/

 

1951 - http://tawfikzone.com/2015/12/19/podcast-alternative-oscars-episode-2-1951/

 

What did you think of the Best Picture nominees of those years? What do you think of our Alternative Nominees? What would be your lineup for Alternative Oscars for the 1950 and 51 cycles? 

 

Is there anything we can do to improve our discussion? Any constructive feedback is appreciated. I hope you'll stay tuned for our 1952 entry which we aim to do mid- to late- February. 

 

Thanks,

 

Adam

What an incredible idea and they say you can't change history.

 

I say now with your podcasts, one can!

 

I'll have to go check this out. Right now without looking I think that I might have to agree with some of the AA wins since isn't that the year that "All About Eve" was in the running and Bette and Anne Baxter knocked each other out for the best actress though. Back in a bit!

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What an incredible idea and they say you can't change history.

 

I say now with your podcasts, one can!

 

I'll have to go check this out. Right now without looking I think that I might have to agree with some of the AA wins since isn't that the year that "All About Eve" was in the running and Bette and Anne Baxter knocked each other out for the best actress though. Back in a bit!

Hi CaveGirl,

 

I am trying to change history in my small way  :) . I love All About Eve and Sunset Blvd.; 1950 is actually a pretty good year for the Oscars. I really start to depart from the AAs in 1951. I look forward to your thoughts. Thanks.

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Your podcast sounds right up my alley. I think I'll check it out this weekend when I have a little time to savor it.

 

My votes would differ a bit from the Academy's, although I wouldn't venture too far off the beaten path, mostly picking other highly acclaimed movies from those years.

 

1950 would be straight across the board ALL ABOUT EVE for me in all the major categories, one of my all-time favorite movies and one I would probably include if I was ever named a TCM Guest Programmer (if I was allowed - I think its total number of TCM airings, sadly, is still in the single digits). Best Picture, Mankiewicz for Best Director, Davis for Best Actress ... and George Sanders for Best Actor! Come on, it was a leading performance. He has as big a role as anyone else in this ensemble piece, and his voiceover narration kicks off the movie. Sorry, Jose Ferrer. I liked you better in WHIRLPOOL and THE CAINE MUTINY.

 

My Best Picture pick for 1951 would be STRANGERS ON A TRAIN. All that (admittedly) great acting in STREETCAR, doesn't, in my opinion, make for one of the all-time great movies. While I admire the technique, I always find STREETCAR a pretty tiring watch. No one goes on and on about the amazing acting in STRANGERS ON A TRAIN (well, except for Robert Walker, maybe), but nevertheless, it's the really great movie, in my opinion. So, Best Picture for STRANGERS and Best Director for Alfred Hitchcock. You hear people say AMERICAN IN PARIS won only because of the extra-long masterpiece-themed dance number at the end. While I find Leslie Caron adorable, and I always like Gene Kelly, the plot to this movie is pretty weak, and the songs, while Gershwin classics all, feel tacked-on just to have a Gershwin theme rather than being integral to the plot.

 

I would stick with Vivien Leigh for Best Actress and go with Brando over Bogart for Best Actor. Bogie is great fun in AFRICAN QUEEN, but I liked him better in at least a half-dozen other performances, and I will go with the mythology that Brando revolutionized movie acting with his performance. I don't find him mumbly (a frequent Brando criticism around here) at all, but absolutely riveting. It all turned out good - Bogie finally got his well-deserved Oscar for something, and Brando would only have to wait a few more years, but I would have given each actor their Oscars for different performances (Bogie for CASABLANCA, no doubt, over Paul Lukas. What was the Academy thinking that year?) 

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Your podcast sounds right up my alley. I think I'll check it out this weekend when I have a little time to savor it.

 

My votes would differ a bit from the Academy's, although I wouldn't venture too far off the beaten path, mostly picking other highly acclaimed movies from those years.

 

1950 would be straight across the board ALL ABOUT EVE for me in all the major categories, one of my all-time favorite movies and one I would probably include if I was ever named a TCM Guest Programmer (if I was allowed - I think its total number of TCM airings, sadly, is still in the single digits). Best Picture, Mankiewicz for Best Director, Davis for Best Actress ... and George Sanders for Best Actor! Come on, it was a leading performance. He has as big a role as anyone else in this ensemble piece, and his voiceover narration kicks off the movie. Sorry, Jose Ferrer. I liked you better in WHIRLPOOL and THE CAINE MUTINY.

 

My Best Picture pick for 1951 would be STRANGERS ON A TRAIN. All that (admittedly) great acting in STREETCAR, doesn't, in my opinion, make for one of the all-time great movies. While I admire the technique, I always find STREETCAR a pretty tiring watch. No one goes on and on about the amazing acting in STRANGERS ON A TRAIN (well, except for Robert Walker, maybe), but nevertheless, it's the really great movie, in my opinion. So, Best Picture for STRANGERS and Best Director for Alfred Hitchcock. You hear people say AMERICAN IN PARIS won only because of the extra-long masterpiece-themed dance number at the end. While I find Leslie Caron adorable, and I always like Gene Kelly, the plot to this movie is pretty weak, and the songs, while Gershwin classics all, feel tacked-on just to have a Gershwin theme rather than being integral to the plot.

 

I would stick with Vivien Leigh for Best Actress and go with Brando over Bogart for Best Actor. Bogie is great fun in AFRICAN QUEEN, but I liked him better in at least a half-dozen other performances, and I will go with the mythology that Brando revolutionized movie acting with his performance. I don't find him mumbly (a frequent Brando criticism around here) at all, but absolutely riveting. It all turned out good - Bogie finally got his well-deserved Oscar for something, and Brando would only have to wait a few more years, but I would have given each actor their Oscars for different performances (Bogie for CASABLANCA, no doubt, over Paul Lukas. What was the Academy thinking that year?) 

Hi Sewhite2000, Our tastes in film seem to be very similar so far. I never personally begrudged Bogie's win for Best Actor in The African Queen. He played against type really well and gave one of the greatest comic performances. I do wish that he won more Oscars in addition to The African Queen. I think he should have won for In a Lonely Place, which is his truly best performance (and maybe film too).

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My choices for 1950

 

 

Sunset Blvd

All About Eve

The Flowers of Saint Francis

La Ronde

Orpheus

 

George Sanders, All About Eve

Humphrey Bogart, In a Lonely Place

William Holden, Sunset Blvd

Takashi Shimura, Rashomon

Gregory Peck, The Gunfighter

 

Gloria Swanson, Sunset Blvd

Bette Davis, All About Eve

Ingrid Bergman, Stromboli

Peggy Cummins, Gun Crazy

Gloria Grahame, In a Lonely Place

 

Orson Welles, The Third Man

Anton Walbrook, La Ronde

Erich von Stroheim, Sunset Blvd.

Severino Pasascione, The Flowers of Saint Francis

Toshiro Mifune, Rashomon

 

Alida Valli, The Third Man

Anne Baxter, All About Eve

Danielle Darrieux, La Ronde

Maria Casares, Orpheus

Thelma Ritter, All About Eve

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My choices for 1950

 

 

Sunset Blvd

All About Eve

The Flowers of Saint Francis

La Ronde

Orpheus

 

George Sanders, All About Eve

Humphrey Bogart, In a Lonely Place

William Holden, Sunset Blvd

Takashi Shimura, Rashomon

Gregory Peck, The Gunfighter

 

Gloria Swanson, Sunset Blvd

Bette Davis, All About Eve

Ingrid Bergman, Stromboli

Peggy Cummins, Gun Crazy

Gloria Grahame, In a Lonely Place

 

Orson Welles, The Third Man

Anton Walbrook, La Ronde

Erich von Stroheim, Sunset Blvd.

Severino Pasascione, The Flowers of Saint Francis

Toshiro Mifune, Rashomon

 

Alida Valli, The Third Man

Anne Baxter, All About Eve

Danielle Darrieux, La Ronde

Maria Casares, Orpheus

Thelma Ritter, All About Eve

Good choices. I love Bogie and Gloria Grahame in Ina Lonely Place. Underrated performances in a criminally underrated film. I'm with you, Sunset Blvd and All About Eve are my fave films from 1950. 

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My choices for 1951

 

Alice in Wonderland

The River

Miracle in Milan

Diary of a Country Priest

Strangers on a Train

 

Robert Walker, Strangers on a Train

Marlon Brando, A Streetcar Named Desire

Chishu Ryu, Early Summer

Gene Kelly, An American in Paris

Kirk Douglas, Ace in the Hole

 

Vivian Leigh, A Streetcar Named Desire

Kathryn Beaumont, Alice in Wonderland

Ingrid Bergman, Europa 51

Setsuko Hara, Early Summer

Patricia Walters, The River

 

Karl Malden, A Streetcar Named Desire

Stanley Holloway, The Lavender Hill Mob

Sterling Holloway, Alice in Wonderland

Adolphe Menjou, The Tall Target

Richard Loo, The Steel Helmet

 

Kim Hunter, A Streetcar Named Desire

Chieko Higashiyama, Early Summer

Ludmilla Tcherina, The Tales of Hoffman

Nora Swinburne, The River

Radha Burnier, The River

 

Jean Renoir, The River

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My choices for 1951

 

Alice in Wonderland

The River

Miracle in Milan

Diary of a Country Priest

Strangers on a Train

 

Robert Walker, Strangers on a Train

Marlon Brando, A Streetcar Named Desire

Chishu Ryu, Early Summer

Gene Kelly, An American in Paris

Kirk Douglas, An Ace in the Hole

 

Vivian Leigh, A Streetcar Named Desire

Kathryn Beaumont, Alice in Wonderland

Ingrid Bergman, Europa 51

Setsuko Hara, Early Summer

Patricia Walters, The River

 

Karl Malden, A Streetcar Named Desire

Stanley Holloway, The Lavender Hill Mob

Sterling Holloway, Alice in Wonderland

Adolphe Menjou, The Tall Target

Richard Loo, The Steel Helmet

 

Kim Hunter, A Streetcar Named Desire

Chieko Higashiyama, Early Summer

Ludmilla Tcherina, The Tales of Hoffman

Nora Swinburne, The River

Radha Burnier, The River

 

Jean Renoir, The River

I like your BP pick; Alice in Wonderland is a bold choice. I think it's one of Disney's better movies and one of the few that isn't dumbed down. I know a lot of people love The River but I just couldn't get into it. I am with you on Strangers; one of the best films ever.

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