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LawrenceA

Favorite Vampire films w/o Dracula!

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Since I'm one of the horror standard-bearers around here, it behooves me to start a thread on a scaaarrry topic. So in this one, we'll list and discuss our favorite films dealing with vampires OTHER than Dracula. Any time period is acceptable. So here are my:

 

Favorite Vampire Movies Without Dracula

 

1. Near Dark (1987)

2. Fright Night (1985)

3. Lifeforce (1985)

4. Martin (1977)

5. Cronos (1993)

6. Let the Right One In (2008)

7. Vampyr (1932)

8. 30 Days of Night (2007)

9. What We Do In the Shadows (2014)

10. Kiss of the Vampire (1963)

11. The Fearless Vampire Killers (1967)

12. Bloodstone: Subspecies 2 (1993)

13. Dracula's Daughter (1936)

14. The Lost Boys (1987)

15. The Vampire Lovers (1970)

16. Thirst (2009)

17. Vamp (1986)

18. Interview with the Vampire (1994)

19. The Brides of Dracula (1960)

20. Blade 2 (2002)

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Are you familiar with the works of: Jean Rollin?

 

Lips of Blood (1975)

The Nude Vampire (1970) 

Two Orphan Vampires (1997)

Fascination (1979)

Requiem for a Vampire (1971)

The Rape of the Vampire (1968)

The Shiver of the Vampires (1971)

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Larry I am right in the thick of watching a bunch of these right now.  I started with the Universal and Hammer Dracula's but they don't count.

Of the ones that you have mentioned I really liked 30 Days of Night, Let the Right One In and The Fearless Vampire Killers.

I'll check back in with you if I hit any new good ones.

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Return of the Vampire (1943) is a pretty good film, with Bela Lugosi playing a vampire but not Dracula. Frieda Inescourt is particularly good as is Matt Willis as a werewolf who seems to be carrying his laundry around for much of the film.

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Are you familiar with the works of: Jean Rollin?

 

Lips of Blood (1975)

The Nude Vampire (1970)

Two Orphan Vampires (1997)

Fascination (1979)

Requiem for a Vampire (1971)

The Rape of the Vampire (1968)

The Shiver of the Vampires (1971)

Sans, I've seen all of those except FASCINATION. Rollin's films are definitely unique. I've also seen :

 

THE IRON ROSE (1973)

THE GRAPES OF DEATH (1978)

NIGHT OF THE HUNTED (1980)

FIANCEE OF DRACULA (2002)

 

and I also have THE LIVING DEAD GIRL (1982) which I'll be watching soon.

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THE IRON ROSE (1973)

FIANCEE OF DRACULA (2002)

THE LIVING DEAD GIRL (1982) 

 

 

I have not seen these. I can not say why I like his movies. Perhaps it is underlying surrealism in a genre which is normally blatant.

 

I must wonder when TCM will do a tribute to this director and his lovely works.

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I have not seen these. I can not say why I like his movies. Perhaps it is underlying surrealism in a genre which is normally blatant.

 

I must wonder when TCM will do a tribute to this director and his lovely works.

TCM has shown THE IRON ROSE at least once. I recorded it. It was probably as a TCM UNDERGROUND showing. I've read that it's considered Rollin's most mainstream film, but it's just as strange and dreamlike as his others, imho. There were fewer naked people, so maybe that's what they mean.

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"Daughters of Darkness" (1971)--Delphine Seyrig stars as a possible(?) vampire; who menaces an eloped newlywed couple.  An aged bellhop insists he recognizes her from fifty years ago when she stayed at the hotel she checks into again.  She and the newlyweds are at the same hotel: there is a series of murders going on in the city.  Seyrig's character denies being a vampire, but acknowledges being a descendant of Elizabeth Bathory (Google the name if it doesn't ring a bell).  The three form a triangle.  Any more info and I'll spoil the film.

 

"Blood and Roses" (1961)--Early Mario Bava film where the heroine is named Carmilla; is she being menaced by a vampire--or something else?

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A few others:

 

COUNTESS DRACULA (1970) - Ingrid Pitt from THE VAMPIRE LOVERS stars as Countess Bathory.

 

VAMPYRES (1974) - Sapphic vampire adventures.

 

CAPTAIN KRONOS: VAMPIRE HUNTER (1974) - Fun late-period Hammer.

 

NADJA (1995) - unique indie vamp tale.

 

THE ADDICTION (1995) - Lili Taylor and Christopher Walken in this vampirism-as-drug-addiction variation.

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I'm looking at a list of vampire films, and a few other titles worth mentioning are:

 

FROM DUSK TILL DAWN (1996)

JOHN CARPENTER'S VAMPIRES (1997)

LEMORA: A CHILD'S TALE OF THE SUPERNATURAL (1973)

STEPHEN KING'S THE NIGHT FLIER (1996)

SALEM'S LOT (1979)

BLACK SABBATH (1964)

DAYBREAKERS (2009)

THE HUNGER (1983) should have been on my favorites list

 

I've also heard good things about BYZANTIUM (2012) and ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE (2013), but I haven't seen either yet.

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Ganja and Hess (1973) by Bill Gunn is an acclaimed black art house vampire film.  The Movie Guide by James Pallot gives it four and a half stars out of five.  At least one imdb review raves about it and apparently it garnered a standing ovation at its premiere in Cannes.

I watched it last night and I'm afraid I just didn't get it.  Like a lot of underground films it is naturally rough around the edges but that's not what put me off the film.  I found it a bit dull so perhaps then I wasn't giving the film the attention it needed to figure out its 'art house' meaning.  I found that I had to read the reviews to figure out what I had just watched.  Not a great sign.

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I've also heard good things about BYZANTIUM (2012) and ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE (2013), but I haven't seen either yet.

 

I generally like Jarmusch but Only Lovers Left Alive (2013) didn't really do it for me.

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Ganja and Hess (1973) by Bill Gunn is an acclaimed black art house vampire film.  The Movie Guide by James Pallot gives it four and a half stars out of five.  At least one imdb review raves about it and apparently it garnered a standing ovation at its premiere in Cannes.

I watched it last night and I'm afraid I just didn't get it.  Like a lot of underground films it is naturally rough around the edges but that's not what put me off the film.  I found it a bit dull so perhaps then I wasn't giving the film the attention it needed to figure out its 'art house' meaning.  I found that I had to read the reviews to figure out what I had just watched.  Not a great sign.

I just watched this for the first time last year. I had the same reaction to it, although I liked seeing Duane Jones in something other than NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD. This was remade by Spike Lee recently as DA SWEET BLOOD OF JESUS. Haven't seen that version yet.

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I get irritated when the old rules change. For example, although I really liked Let the Right One In, I didn't like the new rule about the vampire needing to be invited in. I later saw the stage version of the film (great, though kinkier); and read some of the source material.  A friend recently told me about another fairly contemporary vampire movie about vampires living an urban life and going to clubs, but that they needed to be invited in.

 

From whence does this new (to me) need for an invitation arise, as if the vampires have become Uncle Elliott (Clifton Webb) in The Razor's Edge, longing for an invitation from the Princess Novemalli?

 

Count Dracula never needed an invitation!

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I get irritated when the old rules change. For example, although I really liked Let the Right One In, I didn't like the new rule about the vampire needing to be invited in. I later saw the stage version of the film (great, though kinkier); and read some of the source material.  A friend recently told me about another fairly contemporary vampire movie about vampires living an urban life and going to clubs, but that they needed to be invited in.

 

From whence does this new (to me) need for an invitation arise, as if the vampires have become Uncle Elliott (Clifton Webb) in The Razor's Edge, longing for an invitation from the Princess Novemalli?

 

Count Dracula never needed an invitation!

 

Actually, the invitation thing goes back a ways. I remember it clearly in Fright Night (1985). I checked Wikipedia, and the source book cited for the invitation rule dates to 1960. I found this entry as well:

 

  In older myths and some modern ones, vampires are really seen as a type of malevolent spirit or a demon, often one that has come to inhabit the body of a person who died under unfortunate circumstances (such as being the victim of a vampire, a suicide, a cursed individual, etc). 

A person's home is his sanctuary and automatically gives him some protection against outside demonic influences, which is why the vampire cannot enter without an invitation. Once invited once, however, the gateway has been opened and the vampire is free to come and go as he pleases.

 
Source(s):Spence, Lewis (1960). An Encyclopaedia of Occultism. New Hyde Parks: University Books.  "
 
The contemporary film your friend mentioned may be What We Do In the Shadows (2014), a vampire comedy from New Zealand that was fantastic. 

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Peter Cushing mentions that a vampire must be invited in several times in the Hammer films.  I just watched them last week.

In the later Hammer Dracs it was usually a crooked priest under the influence who opened the window for Chris Lee.

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Another interesting trivia bit is that sunlight was never traditionally fatal to vampires. They were said not to like it, and they avoided it, but it did no real harm to them. That is, until Murnau decided to kill off Count Orlok in Nosferatu (1922) with sunlight. Now it has become the most commonly cited weakness for vampires. Just as a stake through the heart wasn't meant to kill a vampire, merely to hold him in place while the vamp killer either beheaded the creature or set him on fire, or both!

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I like the detail of birds don't sing near Dracula's castle.  This has been used in several films including Horror of Dracula (1958).  When I saw Brides of Dracula (1960) the dumb sound editor had put a singing bird track all over an exterior of the vampire's castle.   I guess nobody told him.

 

Another detail I liked from Horror of Dracula was when Lee bounded up the stairs there was no sound of footsteps.  Then when Cushing followed it was clomp, clomp, clomp.  Very effective.

 

All of the vampire films are starting to run together but I think there is a shot in Son Of Dracula (1943) where you can see Chaney's reflection in a mirror.

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Peter Cushing mentions that a vampire must be invited in several times in the Hammer films.  I just watched them last week.

In the later Hammer Dracs it was usually a crooked priest under the influence who opened the window for Chris Lee.

 

That's interesting, although I think of the Hammer films as kind of nouveau-horror. I wonder if it goes back farther than that? I'll check the Polidori story. (It could be that, in certain folklore and literature, the devil needs to be invited in; maybe the vampire invitation is an extension of that.)

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A few more shrimp for the barbie:
 

Isle of the Dead (1945) - Although no vampires in this one, it is the fear of them that drives the story.

 

Count Yorga, Vampire (1970) and The Return of Count Yorga (1971) - Saw both of these back in the '70s with a large theater audience that was very into them.
 
Twins of Evil (1971) - Just caught this one last week on Blu-Ray. Hard to go wrong with Peter Cushing.
 
The Night Stalker (1972) - I know that this one was made for television. But it definitely rates a mention on this thread. And Darren McGavin and Simon Oakland were ideally paired as reporter and editor.
 
Innocent Blood (1992) - Don Rickles becomes a vampire?!?
 
Shadow of the Vampire (2000) - William Defoe nailed this one.
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I'm quite fond of the extremely silly Mother Riley Meets the Vampire, Arthur Lucan's last film as the Irish washerwoman. In this film (also called Vampire Over London and My Son the Vampire), Lucan comes into contact with Bela Lugosi, who took the gig to earn his fare back to the United States.

 

The movie boasts one of the most ludicrously enjoyable song/dances ever filmed: Lucan singing "I Lift Up My Finger and I Say Tweet Tweet Shush Shush Now Now Come Come," with cast members Hattie Jacques and Dandy Nichols dancing in the background.

 

Favorite line from the film: "You out vamp the vampire!"

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I just watched Hammer's Countess Dracula (1971) with Ingrid Pitt.  It is obviously based on the Countess Bathory story so it isn't really a true vampire film or even a Dracula film.

I mention it here for if I had seen it way-back in 1971 as a teenager I'm sure it would have been a favourite.  The amply endowed women in this film seemed to take every opportunity to remove their tops thank you very much.

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I feel that Let Me In (2010) may be the best vampire movie I've ever seen. It's different from all the others. More serious.

 

I have seen the Swedish original that it was adapted from and I think the American version improved on the original.

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Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter (2012) was quite good.  I wonder if they will be teaching this in American History in 100 years?

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Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter (2012) was quite good.  I wonder if they will be teaching this in American History in 100 years?

I'm not sure if you're joking with your appraisal, but I was actually surprised with that movie. It was much better than I expected. Not a masterpiece or anything, but a fun diversion.

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