Bogie56

Your Favourite Performances from 1930 to present are...

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One of my Internet movie buddies says he thinks that comedy is especially subjective, so that all you can say is that you find it funny or not. So I'm sympathetic to speedracer not being a Marx Brothers fan, even though I love them.

 

And Swithin, on this thread I think it's even safe not to like a certain actress who's a favorite of mine.

 

Tom, thanks for the information about PILGRIMAGE, which I will try to see, and Kay, thank you for telling us about your reaction to Frank McHugh in LILLY TURNER.

 

1931 postscript: thanks to the enthusiastic recommendations, I rented DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE from the local library and enjoyed Fredric March, Miriam Hopkins, and the direction of Rouben Mamoulian.

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One of my Internet movie buddies says he thinks that comedy is especially subjective, so that all you can say is that you find it funny or not. So I'm sympathetic to speedracer not being a Marx Brothers fan, even though I love them.

 

And Swithin, on this thread I think it's even safe not to like a certain actress who's a favorite of mine.

 

Tom, thanks for the information about PILGRIMAGE, which I will try to see, and Kay, thank you for telling us about your reaction to Frank McHugh in LILLY TURNER.

 

1931 postscript: thanks to the enthusiastic recommendations, I rented DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE from the local library and enjoyed Fredric March, Miriam Hopkins, and the direction of Rouben Mamoulian.

Actually, it was me, GregoryPeckfan, who admitted to not being a fan of the Marx Brothers, in response to Speedracer admitting that she found All Quiet on the Western Front boring -the best picture winner for 1930 and one off my personal favourites among anti-war movies.  So thanks for still liking me.

 

I've  seen several movies since this thread started based upon these recommendations.

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Actually, it was me, GregoryPeckfan, who admitted to not being a fan of the Marx Brothers, in response to Speedracer admitting that she found All Quiet on the Western Front boring -the best picture winner for 1930 and one off my personal favourites among anti-war movies.  So thanks for still liking me.

 

I've  seen several movies since this thread started based upon these recommendations.

Thanks Gregory for clearing that up. I actually own all the Marx Brothers films, I enjoy them much more than Three Stooges. A little three stooges goes a long way for me. I also really like Laurel & Hardy but I haven't seen their shorts for years.

 

Re: 'Western Front,' "boring" is the opinion of 14-year old Speedracer, not sure if 31-year old Speedracer would have the same opinion or not. I'd have to try and watch the film again to see if I like it better.

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RE: Speedy not liking  All Quiet on the Western Front - a movie I love:

 

 

Would you  all hate me if I said that I'm not nor ever have been a fan of The Marx Brothers and that the only movie of theirs I've watched more than once is A Night at the Opera because it is full of music?

 

Would you the me?

 

In regards to the thread about Criteria For Association, would you have to put me on ignore?

I wouldn't hate anyone for disliking something. Everyone is entitled to dislike an actor or a film. I'm more interested in why someone feels one way or the other. People that just make statements like: "I don't like this movie," or "I love this movie," without explaining why they feel that way, don't interest me.

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Thanks Gregory for clearing that up. I actually own all the Marx Brothers films, I enjoy them much more than Three Stooges. A little three stooges goes a long way for me. I also really like Laurel & Hardy but I haven't seen their shorts for years.

 

Re: 'Western Front,' "boring" is the opinion of 14-year old Speedracer, not sure if 31-year old Speedracer would have the same opinion or not. I'd have to try and watch the film again to see if I like it better.

I love Laurel and Hardy.  They air a lot on a channel we get in Canada called Silver Screen Classics.

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I can't really put into words why I don't find the Marx brothers funny.  There are actually several comedy teams that I don't find funny. 

 

I love certain *scenes* in their movies like the scene where everyone crowds into a room and everything spills over.  But the movies in their entireties don't work for me.

 

 

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Here are Danny Perry’s Alternate Oscar choices for 1932-1933.  Winners in bold.  Perry does not do supporting roles.  I have put ‘X’s’ beside the non 1933 films.

 

1932-1933 Best Actor

Charles Laughton, The Private Life of Henry VIII* 

Charles Laughton, Island of Lost Souls  X (32)

Groucho Marx, Duck Soup 

Paul Muni, I am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang  X (32)

William Powell, One-Way Passage  X (32)

Claude Rains, The Invisible Man 

Paul Robeson, The Emperor Jones 

Spencer Tracy, The Power and the Glory 

 

1932-1933 Best Actress

Greta Garbo, Queen Christina* 

Joan Blondell, Gold Diggers of 1933 

Marlene Dietrich, Blonde Venus  X (32)

Irene Dunne, Back Street  X (32)

Kay Francis, One-Way Passage  X (32)

Jean Harlow, Red Dust  X (32)

Miriam Hopkins, Trouble In Paradise  X (32)

Barbara Stanwyck, The Bitter Tea of General Yen 

 

 

And here are Michael Gerbert’s Golden Armchair choices for 1933:

 

Best Actor

Groucho Marx, Duck Soup*

 

Best Actress

Miriam Hopkins, The Stranger’s Return*

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GregoryPeckfan--About your post about the Marx Bros.--No danger of you being put on  Ignore because you don't like them.  About a film full of music; TCM aired this gem before you joined the boards--"New Moon" (1930).  Stars are Grace Moore and Lawrence Tibbett, who were both stars at The New York Metropolitan Opera; this was their bid for screen stardom.  Film is 78 minutes long--has ten songs.  There's roughly 4-5 minutes between songs.  If you haven't already seen this, try to find it.  If TCM shows it again at a decent time ( it aired 4:30 a.m. E.S.T.), see it! :)  :)

 

 

 

Back to thread topic. 

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I can't really put into words why I don't find the Marx brothers funny.  There are actually several comedy teams that I don't find funny. 

 

I love certain *scenes* in their movies like the scene where everyone crowds into a room and everything spills over.  But the movies in their entireties don't work for me.

 

The Marx brothers are about so much more than physical comedy. Yes, the ridiculously crowded ship's cabin in Night at the Opera is laugh-out-loud funny, I love it too. But a lot of their comedy, mostly thanks to Groucho,  is extremely fast, clever, verbal humour. Groucho keeps the puns, backwards insults, and general word-play flying so fast, you have to be paying careful attention to catch it all. 

Another aspect of their humour that I love is their sense of the absurd. Nobody combines flights from reality, non sequiturs, and general mayhem into a crazy hilarious (duck) soup like Groucho, Harpo, and Chico. It's their celebration of chaos, their thumbing their noses at the stodginess of decorum, that I think is what I love best about them.

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The Marx brothers are about so much more than physical comedy. Yes, the ridiculously crowded ship's cabin in Night at the Opera is laugh-out-loud funny, I love it too. But a lot of their comedy, mostly thanks to Groucho,  is extremely fast, clever, verbal humour. Groucho keeps the puns, backwards insults, and general word-play flying so fast, you have to be paying careful attention to catch it all. 

Another aspect of their humour that I love is their sense of the absurd. Nobody combines flights from reality, non sequiturs, and general mayhem into a crazy hilarious (duck) soup like Groucho, Harpo, and Chico. It's their celebration of chaos, their thumbing their noses at the stodginess of decorum, that I think is what I love best about them.

 

Yes, indeed.  They took Chaplin's schtick of taking the stuffing out of stuffed shirts to new levels.  And they had some terrific foils too in grande dame, Margaret Dumont, Louis Calhern and many others.

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The Marx brothers are about so much more than physical comedy. 

 

I agree. Although there is some physical comedy, it's the verbal comedy that predominates.  Love those puns! 

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When I said words, I referring to inflections in the voice and banter, kind of like in His girl Friday.  I`m not a fan of The Stooges either, sorry.

 

The only comedy *teams* I find funny are Laurel and Hardy, Abbot and Costello, and my favourite of all -

MONTY PYTHON

 

Next posts to be able to return to 1930s films

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I am heartbroken at the fact that I have written a lot about the Best Acting category and it apparently did not save and I lost everything.  I can only type with one hand.

 

Please indulge me and let me forgo listing people alphabetically and instead by movie so I don`t accidently hit something and lose it.  The movies were written down as I thought of them with artists in them written after.

 

 

 

BEST ACTOR 1933:

 

John Barrymore in Counsellor at Law

John Barrymore in Dinner at Eight

Lionel Barrymore in Dinner at Eight

Robert Armstrong in King Kong

Warner Baxter in 42nd Street

Warner Baxter in Penthouse

Dick Powell in 42nd Street

Dick Powell in Gold Diggers in 1933

Clark Gable in Hold Your Man

Cary Grant in She Done Him Wrong

Charles Laughton in The Private Lives of Henry VIII

Robert Montgomery in When Ladies Meet

Frederic March in Design For Living

George Brent for Baby Face

James Cagney for Footlight Parade

Leslie Howard for Berkley Square

Claude Rains for The Invisible Man

Warren  William for Lady For A Day

 

Winner: James Cagney for Footlight Parade

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BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR 1933

 

 

Fred Astaire in Flying Down to Rio

Wallace Beery in Dinner at Eight

Guy Kibbe in 42nd Street

C. Aubrey Smith in Bombshell

Franchot Tone in Bombshell

Frank Morgan in When Ladies Meet

 

NOTE: WITH MY TYPING ISSUES I REALIZED IN RE-READING THIS I WROTE DOWN THE WRONG MOVIE FOR FRANK MORGAN.  HE WAS NOT IN LADIES THEY TALK ABOUT WHICH I HAD ORIGINALLY LISTED, BUT YOU SEE THE SIMILARITY  IN NAMES...

 

Sigh.

 

 

Winner:

 

Guy Kibbe in 42nd Street

Edited by GregoryPeckfan
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BEST ACTRESS IN 1933: 

 

Joan Bennett in Little Women

Joan Blondell in Footlight Parade

Delores Del Rio in Flying Down to Rio

Marie Dressler in Dinner at Eight

Jean Harlow in Dinner at Eight

Jean Harlow in Bombshell

Jean Harlow in Hold Your Man

Katherine Hepburn in Little Women

Katherine Hepburn in Morning Glory

Miriam Hopkins in Design For Living

Ruby Keeler in 42nd Street

Ruby Keeler in Gold Diggers of 1933

Myrna Loy  in Penthouse

May Robson in Lady For a Day

Barbara Stanwyck in Baby Face

Barbara Stanwyck in Ladies They Talk About

Barbara Stanwyck in The Bitter Tea of General Yen

Gloria Stuart in The Invisible Man

Fay Wray in King Kong

 

Winner:

 

Barbara Stanwyck for Baby Face

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BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN 1933:

 

 

Billy Burke in Dinner at Eight

Una O`Conner in Cavalcade

Ginger Rogers in Gold Diggers of 1933 

Ginger Rogers in 42nd Street

Ginger Rogers in Flying Down to Rio

 

 

 

Winner: Billie Burke for Dinner at Eight

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I'll follow up a bit later with my choices for 1933 but wanted to mention that with regards Dinner at Eight I had determined that there were no real lead performances in that film and I have chosen to put them all in the supporting categories (which Oscar did not have in 1933).  Not that any of this matters. You could argue the case either way.  If it is a true ensemble piece does anyone take the lead?  Is it unfair to judge them against other actors who were more or less carrying an entire picture on their own?

And I put a number of the actors in Grand Hotel (1932) in the lead performances.  I will have to watch them again.  Perhaps this was because it seemed like separate stories where each character was a lead in their own right?

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I'll follow up a bit later with my choices for 1933 but wanted to mention that with regards Dinner at Eight I had determined that there were no real lead performances in that film and I have chosen to put them all in the supporting categories (which Oscar did not have in 1933).  Not that any of this matters. You could argue the case either way.  If it is a true ensemble piece does anyone take the lead?  Is it unfair to judge them against other actors who were more or less carrying an entire picture on their own?

And I put a number of the actors in Grand Hotel (1932) in the lead performances.  I will have to watch them again.  Perhaps this was because it seemed like separate stories where each character was a lead in their own right?

Yes, well that was the thought of Lawrence in listing a Best Ensemble.

 

You notice how in the supporting actress category, I made it to 5 performances mostly through one actress.

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1933: Best Supporting Actor:Single winner marked by 2 asterisks: two or more winners marked by 4

 

Guy Kibbee in 42nd Street

Pat O'Brien in Bombshell

Fred Astaire in Flying Down to Rio**

Arthur Hohl in Wild Boys of the Road

Gavin Gordon in The Bitter Tea of General Yen

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Best Supporting Actress:

 

Una O'Connor in The Invisible Man

Ginger Rogers in 42nd Street

Elsa Lanchester in The Private Life of Henry VIII****

Ginger Rogers in Flying Down to Rio****

Una Merkel in Midnight Mary

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Here are my choices of the 59 films I've seen from 1933 for…

 

Best Supporting Actress of 1933

 

1.  MARIE DRESSLER (Carlotta Vance*), Dinner at Eight

2.  BILLIE BURKE (Millicent Jordan), Dinner at Eight 

3.  ELSA LANCHESTER (Anne of Cleves), The Private Life of Henry VIII

4.  JEAN HARLOW (Kitty Packard), Dinner at Eight

5.  MAY ROBSON (Mrs. Wendel), Dinner at Eight

 

6.  MARY DUNCAN (Rita Vernon), Morning Glory

7.  ISABEL JEWELL (Bessie Green), Counsellor-At-Law

8.  MADGE EVANS (Paula Jordan), Dinner at Eight

9.  MAYO METHOT (Jenny Bailey), The Mind Reader

10.  TOSHIA MORI (Mah-Li), The Bitter Tea of General Yen

 

and ...

 

TEMPE PIGOTT (Mrs. Snapper), Cavalcade

LOUISE DRESSER (Melissa Franke), State Fair

FRANCES DEE (Meg March), Little Women

JOAN BENNETT (Amy March), Little Women

UNA O'CONNOR (Ellen Bridges), Cavalcade

MARGARET HAMILTON (Helen Hallum), Another Language

DORIS KENYON (Mrs. Cora Simon), Counsellor-at-Law

MAYO METHOT (Mrs. Chapman), Counsellor-At-Law

HELEN VINSON (Eve Borden), The Power and the Glory

GLENDA FARRELL ("Missouri Martin"), Lady For a Day

GINGER ROGERS (Fay Fortune), Gold Diggers of 1933

JEAN PARKER (Louise), Lady For a Day

 

*based on Mrs. Patrick Campbell

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Here are my choices of the 59 films I've seen from 1933 for…

 

Best Supporting Actress of 1933

 

1.  MARIE DRESSLER (Carlotta Vance*), Dinner at Eight

2.  BILLIE BURKE (Millicent Jordan), Dinner at Eight 

3.  ELSA LANCHESTER (Anne of Cleves), The Private Life of Henry VIII

4.  JEAN HARLOW (Kitty Packard), Dinner at Eight

5.  MAY ROBSON (Mrs. Wendel), Dinner at Eight

 

6.  MARY DUNCAN (Rita Vernon), Morning Glory

7.  ISABEL JEWELL (Bessie Green), Counsellor-At-Law

8.  MADGE EVANS (Paula Jordan), Dinner at Eight

9.  MAYO METHOT (Jenny Bailey), The Mind Reader

10.  TOSHIA MORI (Mah-Li), The Bitter Tea of General Yen

 

*based on Mrs. Patrick Campbell

I have seen Mrs. Patrick Campbell listed in the credits of movies and often wondered at why her named  appeared as such.

 

Was it a "Mrs. Norman Maine" type of choice for a stage name?

Edited by GregoryPeckfan

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Bogey, the question of leading and supporting roles is a tough one, and one we'll be wrestling with in future years as well.

 

Just in terms of prestige, I'd guess that Dressler, Harlow, Beery, and John Barrymore would all have insisted on being in the lead category for DINNER AT EIGHT, but you have a good rationale for putting them in the supporting category. Rosalind Russell considered herself a star, and did not want a supporting actress nomination for PICNIC. She felt that category for should be reserved for those who were not stars.

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Bogie, I would not really be inclined to categorize the big stars of Dinner at Eight as all being supporting players since that would mean, in turn, that the film had no main players.

 

Yes, it's true that each of them had less actual screen time than the main star of another 1933 production, which does complicate the comparison as far as fairness is concerned, I concede. But, in turn, what about the compromises that would then occur in the supporting player category in which there is more than a fair chance than a supporting performer in another 1933 film may very well NOT have had as much screen time as one of those big stars in "Dinner?"

 

Besides that, I don't quite understand why you classify the stars of Grand Hotel as main players while those in Dinner at Eight are supporting. Did Wallace Beery, for example, really have less screen time in Dinner at Eight than he did in Grand Hotel?

 

But you've brought up an interesting issue of which I think it's difficult to have a definitive answer, except that perhaps the stars of the two all star films should be treated the same as far as main player versus supporting categorizing is concerned.

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Bogie, I would not really be inclined to categorize the big stars of Dinner at Eight as all being supporting players since that would mean, in turn, that the film had no main players.

 

Yes, it's true that each of them had less actual screen time than the main star of another 1933 production, which does complicate the comparison as far as fairness is concerned, I concede. But, in turn, what about the compromises that would then occur in the supporting player category in which there is more than a fair chance than a supporting performer in another 1933 film may very well NOT have had as much screen time as one of those big stars in "Dinner?"

 

Besides that, I don't quite understand why you classify the stars of Grand Hotel as main players while those in Dinner at Eight are supporting. Did Wallace Beery, for example, really have less screen time in Dinner at Eight than he did in Grand Hotel?

 

I did say that I should watch the two films again to try to solve this conundrum.  But I don't think a movie has to necessarily have a lead character.  There can be exceptions.

I'm just guessing at my rationale here when I last saw the films ... but I found Dinner to be an ensemble mixed bag of characters, or all supporting whereas Grand Hotel had separate stories which had separate lead characters.

I don't think screen time is the factor here.  And it is never quite 'fair' even if you did manage to put people in the correct categories.

For me, Alica Vekander's Danish Girl was a lead actress performance this year and therefor if being fair she should not have won an Oscar.  Carol was as much if not more Rooney Mara's story than Cate Blanchett's.  In those two instances the producers chose to use the billing excuse to put them in the supporting category to increase their chances at the award.

Anyway I'm sticking with my Dinner categories until I've seen the film again.  Not that it matters.  The important thing is they were all good performances.

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Here are my choices of the 59 films I've seen from 1933 for…

 

Best Supporting Actress of 1933

 

9.  MAYO METHOT (Jenny Bailey), The Mind Reader

 

and ...

 

MAYO METHOT (Mrs. Chapman), Counsellor-At-Law

 

 

I had Mayo Methot down for two films of 1933.  She's been judged pretty harshly for her personal life.  When I finally saw her in a couple of films I was quite impressed by her acting.  Does anyone else have an opinion on Mayo Methot?

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