Bogie56

Your Favourite Performances from 1930 to present are...

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If you've only seen Myrna Loy in the Thin Man series, The Best Years of Our Lives, etc., it may be a shock to see her as a scheming Eurasian villain in THIRTEEN WOMEN. This is how she was typecast in her early career. Sorority girls have been cruel to the Eurasian outsider, so she determines to have revenge on them, making use of her supposed psychic powers.

 

ME AND MY GAL, directed by Raoul Walsh, is sort of a police vs. bad guys film, but as the title suggests, the best part is romantic comedy, with flatfoot Spencer Tracy and diner waitress Joan Bennett making a really cute couple. Joan was a peroxide blonde in those days. One scene parodies STRANGE INTERLUDE, referred to as "Strange Inner Tube."

 

THE MATCH KING was based on the life of Ivar Kreuger, who had risen from nothing to become a wealthy industrialist. He originated the "three on a match" superstition, the better to sell more matches.

 

Not only did Myrna Loy's screen image change once she started working at MGM, but Spencer Tracy's too. The gum chewing, hard nosed tough guys that he invariably played during the pre-code era (including Me and My Pal, albeit for laughs to a large degree here, noteworthy for its snappy banter) became replaced after a year or so at the new studio by softer, more contemplative screen characters. That would include having Tracy playing priests (okay, maybe priests who had been around the block a bit, but, still, priests).

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I'll be quite honest here about my timing for the 1933 films.  I know Bogie changes the year early Sunday morning and I don't have time to post a long post such as in this thread until afternoon because I have to leave early and then don't get back until after lunch.

 

Problem: the closer it gets to the actual Oscar ceremony this year the more irritated I get with the hoopla this year and I don't think I will want to be online at all tomorrow.  I *may* have to wait until Monday to post my choices and that will drive me crazy......................

 

I love movies made in 1933.

 

Just don't want anyone to think I've forgotten if I decide not to post tomorrow.

 

 If I do it will be straight to this thread and only this thread.

 

 

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I love movies made in 1933.

 

Just don't want anyone to think I've forgotten if I decide not to post tomorrow.

 

 If I do it will be straight to this thread and only this thread.

 

Don't worry about it, GPfan.  You have all week and if you post later it will give us extra time to read what you have listed.

I'm taking the entire week to post my picks.

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It’s time for 1933

 

Here are Oscar’s choices for 1932-1933.  Winners in bold.  Remember, the Oscars did not have supporting awards this year.  We can correct that with all of your choices.  I have put an ‘X’ beside the only non 1933 film.  We will be on 1933 for one week so don't panic!

 

1932-1933 Oscars

 

Best Actor

 

Charles Laughton, The Private Life of Henry VIII*  

Leslie Howard, Berkeley Square   

Paul Muni, I am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang  X (32)

 

Best Actress

 

Katherine Hepburn, Morning Glory*  

May Robson, Lady For a Day  

Diana Wynyard, Cavalcade 

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1933

 

 

Best Actor

Charles Laughton  The Private Life of Henry VIII

Fredric March  Design for Living

Paul Robeson  The Emperor Jones  **

Will Rogers  Doctor Bull

Spencer Tracy  Man's Castle

 

Best Actress

Greta Garbo  Queen Christina **

Katharine Hepburn  Morning Glory

Miriam Hopkins  Design for Living

Barbara Stanwyck  Baby Face

 

Best Supporting Actor

Rudolph Klein-Rogge  The Testament of Dr. Mabuse **

 

Best Supporting Actress

Glenda Farrell  Mystery of the Wax Museum

Una O'Connor  Cavalcade **

 

Best Ensemble

Dinner at Eight **

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Lawrence has us off to a great start for 1933. I forgot a noteworthy performance in 1932: Lee Tracy deserved a mention in the Best Actor category for THE HALF-NAKED TRUTH, a Gregory La Cava comedy which is as funny as its name.

 

1933:

 

Best Actor:

 

Groucho Marx, DUCK SOUP*

Warren William, EMPLOYEES' ENTRANCE

John Barrymore, COUNSELLOR AT LAW

Nils Asther, THE BITTER TEA OF GENERAL YEN

Charles Laughton, THE PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII

Lee Tracy, BOMBSHELL

Spencer Tracy, MAN'S CASTLE

 

Best Actress:

 

Katharine Hepburn, LITTLE WOMEN* (my favorite KH performance)

Barbara Stanwyck, BABY FACE

Barbara Stanwyck, THE BITTER TEA OF GENERAL YEN

Greta Garbo, QUEEN CHRISTINA

Miriam Hopkins, THE STORY OF TEMPLE DRAKE

Miriam Hopkins, DESIGN FOR LIVING

Jean Harlow, BOMBSHELL

Jean Harlow, DINNER AT EIGHT

Marie Dressler, DINNER AT EIGHT

 

Best Supporting Actress:

 

Pert Kelton, BED OF ROSES*

Joan Bennett, LITTLE WOMEN

Margaret Dumont, DUCK SOUP

Laura Hope Crews, THE SILVER CORD

Elsa Lanchester, THE PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII

 

Special "This Year I Didn't Play a Nun, a Farmer's Daughter, or a Bishop's Wife" Award to Loretta Young, who 1) cheated on her boyfriend by sleeping with her boss (EMPLOYEES' ENTRANCE), 2) got pregnant out of wedlock by a hobo (MAN'S CASTLE), and 3) ran a gang when her gangster boyfriend got sent to jail (MIDNIGHT MARY), and was quite good in all three movies.

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kingrat, You have a few I considered. I originally had Kate for Little Women as well, but went with Morning Glory instead. I should have just nominated her twice. I also considered Nils Asther for General Yen.

 

The rest of your nominations that I didn't mention are for films I have missed, except for Duck Soup.

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In 1934 Katharine Hepburn will win the Best Actress Award at the Venice Fiim Festival for Little Women (1933).  I gather that the Venice film Festival which began in 1932 is the oldest international film festival in the world.

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1933 Favorites

 

Best Actress

 

Joan Blondell (Gold Diggers of 1933)

Ruth Chatterton (Female)

Katharine Hepburn (Little Women)
Ethel Waters (Rufus Jones for President)
Mae West (She Done Him Wrong)
 
Best Actor
 
Warner Baxter (42nd Street)
James Cagney (Footlight Parade)
Sammy Davis Jr. (Rufus Jones for President)
Groucho Marx (Duck Soup)
Claude Rains (The Invisible Man)
 
Best Supporting Actress
 
Spring Byington (Little Women)
Maude Eberne (The Vampire Bat)
Aline MacMahon (Gold Diggers of 1933)
Edna May Oliver (Little Women)
Rafaela Ottiano (She Done Him Wrong)
 
Best Supporting Actor
 
Ralf Harolde (I'm No Angel)
Guy Kibbee (Gold Diggers of 1933)
Paul Lukas (Secret of the Blue Room)
Douglass Montgomery (Little Women)
Herbert Mundin (Cavalcade)
 
 
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A note about some of the less familiar films on my list, most of which have been shown on TCM:

 

COUNSELLOR AT LAW is a William Wyler film based on an Elmer Rice play, and one of the best translations of play to film that I know. Wyler keeps the action in the law office and the corridor outside, and the directing is superb. John Barrymore plays a lawyer from humble origins who has been successful and has married a high society wife. We see a variety of his clients on the day that his personal and professional lives start to fall apart. Fun fact: two future directors are in this film. Vincent Sherman plays a Communist agitator and Richard Quine plays Barrymore's whiny, ungrateful stepson.

 

EMPLOYEES' ENTRANCE is classic pre-Code. Warren William plays a driven department store owner who has an eye for the women who work there, Loretta Young among them. A hit at the TCM festival a couple of years ago.

 

BED OF ROSES is a Gregory La Cava romantic comedy. Constance Bennett sponges and steals from men, but finally falls for a good guy (Joel McCrea). Pert Kelton plays the best friend with the snappy repartee and steals every scene she's in.

 

THE SILVER CORD is based on a Sidney Howard play about a mother who keeps her two sons tightly tied to her with that metaphoric silver cord. Pity the woman like Irene Dunne who falls for one of them. Laura Hope Crews has the juicy role of the mother from hell. I saw this years ago on TV; perhaps there are rights difficulties that have kept it off TCM.

 

THE STORY OF TEMPLE DRAKE is based on Faulkner's novel SANCTUARY. Even if the most shocking detail from the novel is left out of the movie, it's still strong stuff, and was one of the films that vanished once the Production Code started being enforced in July 1934. Miriam Hopkins is well cast as the strong and willful Southern belle who is no match for the gangster (Jack La Rue) she becomes involved with.

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1933 is another outstanding year for performances. The following is more or less in order of preference, with the winner, of course, in bold type.

 

BEST ACTOR

 

Charles Laughton, PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII

John Barrymore, COUNCILLOR AT LAW

Claude Rains, THE INVISIBLE MAN

John Barrymore, TOPAZE

Lee Tracy, BOMBSHELL

 

Honourable Mention: Spencer Tracy in A Man's Castle, James Cagney in Footlight Parade, Lee Tracy in Advice to the Lovelorn, Fredric March in Eagle and the Hawk, Will Rogers in State Fair, Warner Baxter in 42nd Street, George Arliss in Voltaire.

 

BEST ACTRESS

 

Greta Garbo, QUEEN CHRISTINA

Henrietta Crosman, PILGRIMAGE

Katharine Hepburn, LITTLE WOMEN

Jean Harlow, DINNER AT EIGHT

Miriam Hopkins, STORY OF TEMPLE DRAKE

 

Honourable Mention: Barbara Stanwyck in Baby Face, Marie Dressler in Dinner at Eight, Jean Harlow in Bombshell, Barbara Stanwyck in Bitter Tea of General Yen, Joan Blondell in Footlight Parade, Marie Dressler in Tugboat Annie.

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

 

Guy Kibbee, GOLD DIGGERS OF 1933

Adophe Menjou, MORNING GLORY

Lee Tracy, DINNER AT EIGHT

Walter Connolly, BITTER TEA OF GENERAL YEN

Charley Chase, SONS OF THE DESERT

 

Honourable Mention: Jack LaRue in Story of Temple Drake.

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

 

Aline MacMahon, GOLD DIGGERS OF 1933

Una O'Connor, THE INVISIBLE MAN

Lucille La Verne, PILGRIMAGE

Bebe Daniels, COUNCILLOR AT LAW

Louise Dresser, STATE FAIR

 

Honourable Mention: Myrna Loy in Topaze.

 

SPECIAL NON-STOP ACTOR OF THE YEAR BEFORE HIS CAREER WENT OVER THE BRINK AWARD:

 

Lee Tracy, for Bombshell, Advice to the Lovelorn, The Nuisance, Clear All Wires, Turn Back the Clock and Dinner at Eight

 

SPECIAL GOOD SPORT OF THE YEAR AWARD:

 

Margaret Dumont for Duck Soup.

 

SPECIAL IT SURE IS A LOT OF FUN TO WATCH AWARD:

 

Mae West, I'm No Angel

Lionel Atwill, Mystery of the Wax Museum

Lionel Atwill, Murders at the Zoo

Title Character, King Kong

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1933:  Best Actor: Winners shown by two asterisks, ties by four asterisks:

 

Charles Laughton in The Private Life of Henry VIII

Paul Robeson in The Emperor Jones****

Nils Asther in The Bitter Tea of General Yen

Claude Rains in The Invisible Man

John Gilbert in Queen Christina***

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Best Actress:

 

Barbara Stanwyck in The Bitter Tea of General Yen**

Katharine Hepburn in Little Women

Greta Garbo in Queen Christina

Jean Harlow in Bombshell

Marie Dressler in Tugboat Annie

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Best Ensemble(s):

 

Dinner at Eight****

Duck Soup****

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Best Ensemble(s)

 

Dinner at Eight****

Duck Soup****

 

coca-cola_dinner_at_eight_1933.jpg

 

That great ensemble was even gathered for this Coke advertisement. One of the few cast members missing here is John Barrymore. (Guess he couldn't handle the soft stuff).

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1933

 

 

Best Actor

Charles Laughton  The Private Life of Henry VIII

Fredric March  Design for Living

Paul Robeson  The Emperor Jones  **

Will Rogers  Doctor Bull

Spencer Tracy  Man's Castle

 

Best Actress

Greta Garbo  Queen Christina **

Katharine Hepburn  Morning Glory

Miriam Hopkins  Design for Living

Barbara Stanwyck  Baby Face

 

Best Supporting Actor

Rudolph Klein-Rogge  The Testament of Dr. Mabuse **

 

Best Supporting Actress

Glenda Farrell  Mystery of the Wax Museum

Una O'Connor  Cavalcade **

 

Best Ensemble

Dinner at Eight **

I've never even heard of The Testament of dr. Mabuse.  Wow.

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coca-cola_dinner_at_eight_1933.jpg

 

That great ensemble was even gathered for this Coke advertisement. One of the few cast members missing here is John Barrymore. (Guess he couldn't handle the soft stuff).

Where did you find this fabulous poster???????????????????????????????

 

I'd love to have in on my wall.

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Lawrence has us off to a great start for 1933. I forgot a noteworthy performance in 1932: Lee Tracy deserved a mention in the Best Actor category for THE HALF-NAKED TRUTH, a Gregory La Cava comedy which is as funny as its name.

 

1933:

 

Best Actor:

 

Groucho Marx, DUCK SOUP*

Warren William, EMPLOYEES' ENTRANCE

John Barrymore, COUNSELLOR AT LAW

Nils Asther, THE BITTER TEA OF GENERAL YEN

Charles Laughton, THE PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII

Lee Tracy, BOMBSHELL

Spencer Tracy, MAN'S CASTLE

 

Best Actress:

 

Katharine Hepburn, LITTLE WOMEN* (my favorite KH performance)

Barbara Stanwyck, BABY FACE

Barbara Stanwyck, THE BITTER TEA OF GENERAL YEN

Greta Garbo, QUEEN CHRISTINA

Miriam Hopkins, THE STORY OF TEMPLE DRAKE

Miriam Hopkins, DESIGN FOR LIVING

Jean Harlow, BOMBSHELL

Jean Harlow, DINNER AT EIGHT

Marie Dressler, DINNER AT EIGHT

 

Best Supporting Actress:

 

Pert Kelton, BED OF ROSES*

Joan Bennett, LITTLE WOMEN

Margaret Dumont, DUCK SOUP

Laura Hope Crews, THE SILVER CORD

Elsa Lanchester, THE PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII

 

Special "This Year I Didn't Play a Nun, a Farmer's Daughter, or a Bishop's Wife" Award to Loretta Young, who 1) cheated on her boyfriend by sleeping with her boss (EMPLOYEES' ENTRANCE), 2) got pregnant out of wedlock by a hobo (MAN'S CASTLE), and 3) ran a gang when her gangster boyfriend got sent to jail (MIDNIGHT MARY), and was quite good in all three movies.

Hey, don't get me started on what kind of a hypocrite I think Loretta Young was.

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There are already about ten movies people have listed that I have not seen.

 

 

I will wait until another day to offer my choices in major categories  as Bogie suggested, but I just had to read these comments and your choices.

 

I will offer my two choices for unique categories that I really have only one choice for each:

 

 

Best Animal Performance: King Kong

 

Best Synergy: Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in going Down to Rio.

 

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Tom, I'm not familiar with Henrietta Crosman or PILGRIMAGE.

 

I couldn't agree more about the excellent performances this year, with Hepburn, Stanwyck, and Garbo (to name only a few) all doing some of their best work.

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Tom, I'm not familiar with Henrietta Crosman or PILGRIMAGE.

 

I couldn't agree more about the excellent performances this year, with Hepburn, Stanwyck, and Garbo (to name only a few) all doing some of their best work.

 

Kingrat, Pilgrimage is an unusual, unjustly little remembered John Ford film with a largely bucolic setting, deeply sensitive and touching, in my opinion. Henrietta Crosman was a distinguished stage actress who appeared in a few films. She was about 72 when she played proud, stubborn Hannah Jessop in this film, her second talkie. Her character objects to her son marrying a particular local girl, even instrumental in her stubborness in sending him into a war to avoid the girl, in fact.

 

I don't wish to reveal any more of the story but I found Crosman's portrayal of a proud woman who comes to deeply regret her actions extraordinarily moving. The film becomes quite heart breaking at times, but is levelled with some unexpected (and most welcomed) humour in the form of character actress Lucille La Verne (later the voice of the wicked Witch in Snow White) as a corncob pipe smoking hill woman who dispenses a lot of wise, common sense wisdom.

 

Pilgrimage is a lovely little Ford film, not one of his major achievements, by any means, but more than worthy of several viewings, in my opinion. Thus my high ranking of the two actresses's performances in it. It has been on TCM at least once in the past, but it's a Fox film so I'm not holding my breath that it will be on again soon. It is available in DVD, though, with Born Reckless, an Edmund Lowe film, with Lee Tracy (one of my favourites)  in a supporting role.

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1933 - Not much on my list that hasn't already been noted. In the assumption that everyone has already seen Duck Soup I've omitted most of the roles in that for convenience- and fairness. Otherwise they would walk away with the year.
 

Actor

James Cagney -  Footlight Parade 
Walter Huston -  Gabriel Over the White House 
Charles Laughton -  The Private Lif e of Henry VIII*** 
Fredric March - The Eagle and the Hawk
 
Actress
 
Joan Blondell - Gold Diggers of 1933
Glenda Farrell - Mystery of the Wax Museum
Miriam Hopkins - The Story of Temple Drake***
 
Supporting Actor
 
Robert Barrat -  Lilly Turner 
Louis Calhern -  Duck Soup 
Dwight Frye -  The Vampire Bat 
Harry Langdon -  Hallelujah, I'm a Bum! 
Frank McHugh -  Lilly Turner*** 
 
Supporting Actress
 
Maude Eburne - The Vampire Bat
Elsa Lanchester - The Private Life of Henry VIII***
Aline MacMahon - Gold Diggers of 1933
 
Best Synergy
 
James Cagney and Alice White - The Picture Snatcher

Charles Laughton and Elsa Lanchester - The Private Life of Henry VIII

 

 

...Oh, and who was that guy in The Testament of Dr. Mabuse that lost his mind? I remember him well, if not the rest of the film. I'd have nominated him if I knew the actor's name.

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I haven't participated in this conversation yet, because I haven't seen that many early 1930s films.  I saw All Quiet on the Western Front in the 9th grade and thought it was really boring.  I haven't seen it since.  That was the only 1930 film I think I've seen! I do have some 1930 films on my DVR, but I haven't watched them yet.

 

1933 I think is where I've seen a fair number of films that I could actually have some sort of an informed opinion.  Bold indicates the "winner." 

 

BEST ACTRESS

 

Barbara Stanwyck, Baby Face

Jean Harlow, Dinner at Eight

Barbara Stanwyck, Ladies They Talk About

Katharine Hepburn, Little Women

Joan Crawford, Dancing Lady

 

 

BEST ACTOR

 

Lee Tracy, Bombshell

King Kong, King Kong

The Marx Brothers, Duck Soup

James Cagney, Footlight Parade

Lionel Barrymore, Dinner at Eight

 

BEST PICTURE

 

Baby Face

Bombshell

Duck Soup

Footlight Parade

King Kong

Dancing Lady

Dinner at Eight

 

---

 

Honorary Awards:

 

MOST BIZARRE MUSICAL NUMBER: "Pettin' in the Park," Gold Diggers of 1933

 

BEST ACCOMPANIST: Larry Fine accompanying Joan Crawford's dance number in Dancing Lady

 

BEST SCREAM: Fay Wray, King Kong

 

BEST ENSEMBLE: The Grouchos in Duck Soup

 

MOST IMPORTANT FILM DEBUT: Fred Astaire, Dancing Lady ; Lucille Ball, Roman Scandals

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RE: Speedy not liking  All Quiet on the Western Front - a movie I love:

 

 

Would you  all hate me if I said that I'm not nor ever have been a fan of The Marx Brothers and that the only movie of theirs I've watched more than once is A Night at the Opera because it is full of music?

 

Would you the me?

 

In regards to the thread about Criteria For Association, would you have to put me on ignore?

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RE: Speedy not liking  All Quiet on the Western Front - a movie I love:

 

 

Would you  all hate me if I said that I'm not nor ever have been a fan of The Marx Brothers and that the only movie of theirs I've watched more than once is A Night at the Opera because it is full of music?

 

Would you the me?

 

In regards to the thread about Criteria For Association, would you have to put me on ignore?

 

LOL...I hope not. Comedy is very subjective. I've never cared for the Three Stooges (sorry, Bogie!) for example, but I know they're beloved by many. 

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I considered foregoing the whole list thing this year in lieu of singling out Frank McHugh in Lilly Turner. This is the first film I ever saw McHugh in, I think, and one of the first films I remember grabbing my attention when I was first getting addicted to TCM. Ever since I've had a special affection for McHugh in any role I've seen him in.

 

Mind you, this is not an enormous departure from the roles he usually plays- the lovable booze hound. In this film he plays a variation on that theme, a bit more sympathetically, as a carny who marries a young woman, Lilly, in order to take care of her after she is abandoned by her husband. Nevermind that he can barely take care of himself- he gives her what little support he can provide, getting her a carnival job. He has an easy-going, semi-conscious affection for her, but is ultimately pretty useless as a husband. He at least does not get in her way, seeming to not even notice when she gets sweet with another one of the employees.

 

This is kind of a soap opera, but an exceedingly strange and pre-code-y one. Another notable performance is given by Robert Barrat, who plays an unstable sideshow strong man who becomes interested in Lilly. It seems like Ruth Chatterton was good as Lilly, but I honestly don't remember too well. I'd like to see it again.

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RE: Speedy not liking  All Quiet on the Western Front - a movie I love:

 

 

Would you  all hate me if I said that I'm not nor ever have been a fan of The Marx Brothers and that the only movie of theirs I've watched more than once is A Night at the Opera because it is full of music?

 

Would you the me?

 

In regards to the thread about Criteria For Association, would you have to put me on ignore?

 

You can dislike any actor or group of actors around here, and it's fine. The only exception is if it's a certain actress whose initials are BS. Then the wrath comes down upon you, as if you were a protester at a Donald Trump rally!

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