Sign in to follow this  
IanPatrickMovieReviews

"The Shopworn Angel" 1938 Video Movie Review - 4 Star Movie

12 posts in this topic

Of all their movie collaborations, which one do you like best?

Don't you think they're all equally good in their own way, Ray...? Though the first one, made at Universal, is the least known because it never plays on TCM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't you think they're all equally good in their own way, Ray...? Though the first one, made at Universal, is the least known because it never plays on TCM.

Jarrod, I'm ashamed to admit that I only know "The Mortal Storm" and "The Shop; Around The Corner".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jarrod, I'm ashamed to admit that I only know "The Mortal Storm" and "The Shop; Around The Corner".

Yeah, that's why we sometimes have to seek out what TCM does not broadcast. It's called NEXT TIME WE LOVE. For more, check wiki:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Next_Time_We_Love

 

It was written by Preston Sturges and costars Ray Milland. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the young Jimmy Stewart at MGM.

 

Watching him in "Born To Dance" recently, I couldn't believe it - there he was, singing and dancing.

 

His film career at MGM was so promising.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the young Jimmy Stewart at MGM.

 

Watching him in "Born To Dance" recently, I couldn't believe it - there he was, singing and dancing.

 

His film career at MGM was so promising.

Honestly, I'm surprised he went back to movies after the war. He seemed to love flying and life in the military. His career (and life) took several interesting turns.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the young Jimmy Stewart at MGM.

 

Watching him in "Born To Dance" recently, I couldn't believe it - there he was, singing and dancing.

 

His film career at MGM was so promising.

 

Well this is a case where I feel the opposite;   Early MGM Stewart was just too wimpy -  too country boy soap.    

 

Of course there are some early pre-WWII films of his I like but the work he did after the war was much stronger IMO.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well this is a case where I feel the opposite;   Early MGM Stewart was just too wimpy -  too country boy soap.    

 

Of course there are some early pre-WWII films of his I like but the work he did after the war was much stronger IMO.

As a youngster at MGM, he had so much charm - and genuine charm isn't that easy to achieve on the screen.

 

But, I agree with you, I also like his later work, too

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a youngster at MGM, he had so much charm - and genuine charm isn't that easy to achieve on the screen.

 

But, I agree with you, I also like his later work, too

All his early stuff was not at MGM however.

 

He was loaned to Universal for the first picture he did with Margaret Sullavan. And he was also loaned to Selznick to do MADE FOR EACH OTHER with Carole Lombard. And don't forget NO TIME FOR COMEDY, at Warner Brothers with Rosalind Russell. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with James about Stewart...he definitely felt manlier in his later movies after WWII. He feels like a completely different actor when looking at young Jimmy Stewart and old Jimmy Stewart. Thank God he returned to acting...otherwise we wouldn't have had "Vertigo" <3

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with James about Stewart...he definitely felt manlier in his later movies after WWII. He feels like a completely different actor when looking at young Jimmy Stewart and old Jimmy Stewart. Thank God he returned to acting...otherwise we wouldn't have had "Vertigo" 

The war changed/aged a lot of them. They literally went from being boys to men. 

 

Robert Taylor is a lot more "hardened" in his films after the war. And Sterling Hayden had been what they called a 'pin-up boy' who fell into movies by way of modeling. After the war and a considerable absence from Hollywood, he returns to the screen in much grittier roles in noir and westerns he would not have been able to do earlier in his motion picture career. 

 

Most of them had become tougher, not only in their appearance but in their overall demeanor.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us