slaytonf

Art in Movies

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Something's been nagging me on this subject and I just remembered. Bernardo Bertolucci uses several Francis Bacon paintings in the opening titles of "Last Tango in Paris" (1972). And some of them are reinforced in the costumes and lighting throughout the movie. It was one of the most startling opening credits of any movie I had  seen baconbrandoup til then because I was not familiar with Bacon. Since then I have become a huge fan and have read a lot and visited museums with his paintings.

Here are two self-portraits compared with Brando in the film (sorry they came out above)titlessorry they came out above.

characters

These two sets of images mirror each other in the original paintings by Bacon from the opening credits and in the costumes and poses of Brando and Maria Schneider. 

This is one of my favorite uses of ART in the movies. 

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Image result for edward hoppers third avenue paintings

Image result for edward hopper painting 11am

 

 

I was watching "Force of Evil" 1948 with John Garfield and Thomas Gomez, and the black-and-white cinematography is stark, stunning and reminiscent of Edward Hopper. And then I read that the director Abraham Polonsky gave cinematographer George Barnes a book of Hopper's Third Avenue paintings. And so the inspiration is there. Above is Hopper's "Nighthawks" which is well-known to all art and classic movie fans. Followed by "New York Office."

Although the paintings are in color and the movie in black and white, the tone and shadow and light are very similar. There is a shot where Garfield runs through an empty Wall Street just at dawn. The streets are empty, the skyscrapers form canyons of steel and concrete, and he runs alone, by himself into the city that is engulfing him, literally and story-wise.

I highly recommend this movie for anyone who enjoys fine art influences in classic movies.

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I highly recommend Force of Evil to anyone that likes noir films as well as John Garfield.   This is my favorite Garfield noir and that is saying a lot since he was in many fine ones.    

 

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33 minutes ago, marcar said:

I was watching "Force of Evil" 1948 with John Garfield and Thomas Gomez, and the black-and-white cinematography is stark, stunning and reminiscent of Edward Hopper. And then I read that the director Abraham Polonsky gave cinematographer George Barnes a book of Hopper's Third Avenue paintings. And so the inspiration is there. Above is Hopper's "Nighthawks" which is well-known to all art and classic movie fans. Followed by "New York Office."

Although the paintings are in color and the movie in black and white, the tone and shadow and light are very similar. There is a shot where Garfield runs through an empty Wall Street just at dawn. The streets are empty, the skyscrapers form canyons of steel and concrete, and he runs alone, by himself into the city that is engulfing him, literally and story-wise.

Here's an interior.

garfield.png

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I'd like to belatedly post the remaining images from the movie I mentioned above, West-end Love-in.  The last one's a painting:

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Duffy (1968) is a largely forgotten (even by TCM) heist movie starring James Coburn and Susannah York.  Why it's so is beyond me, because it has everything that makes a heist movie great.  It has a tricky, picaresque plot, with engaging characters, exotic locations, including the coolest beach resort ever (a set, built for the movie!), humor, excitement, and a surprise ending where everyone gets what's coming to them, or what they deserve, and leaves you smiling.  But wait, there's more!  It has James Coburn at his coolest, and lankiest, Susannah York at her slinkiest and sylphiest; a super supporting cast including James Fox, John Alderton, and James Mason; the Mod scene of Sixties London, with a chic, sexy music score by Ernie Freeman; and a killer song sung by Lou Rawls! ("I'm Satisfied," which I don't know why is not a standard.)  

And there's even more than that! providing the pretext for this post.  It has absolutely the most incredible, amazing, fantastic, wild, crazy house in all the movies.  It's Duffy's place in Tangiers, which he has decorated with an irreverent, idiosyncratic collection of--well--sculptures.  They look to be almost entirely female nudes, in a style I can only describe as eclectic found-object.  Duffy calls it "Pop-porn."  Here are some examples (as always, I apologize for the poor image quality):

Man contemplating beast:

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Man makes a find:

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Or_gy in a Wardrobe ™:

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Duffy's balcony of earthly delights:

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I don't want to make this post too long, but Duffy's pad is best appreciated by watching the movie.  I've excerpted the arrival of the heist gang at his place:

 

And finally, Lou Rawls' song.  Here Duffy is arriving at the beach resort, unsuspecting of his imminent involvement in the scheme:

 

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