123 posts in this topic

Gregory Peck, born Eldred Gregory Peck April 5th, 1916 is my favourite actor of all-time. 

 

I have seen 99% of his movies on the big and small screen.

 

I was part of an online Gregory Peck fan club which produced a birthday book for his 85th birthday which -since he knew the founder of our club - went to actual doorstep.

 

I was too devastated when he died to take part in a tribute book that they did for his widow.

 

 

I'm not sure what is happening with that club since I am no longer on Yahooclubs.

 

LawrenceA suggested that I should start a thread on my favourite actor of all time. My Darling Greg -as I like to call him.

 

 

As he got older and more frail I became unable to watch anything sentimental that he was in.  I started to watch only his war films and westerns.  It has only been in the last few years that I have been able to watch movies of other genres.  Now that he has been gone for a long time I can watch things like Roman Holiday again.

 

My favourite Gregory Peck movie of all time is The Guns of Navarone.

 

The first Gregory Peck film I saw was To kill a Mockingbird back in grade ten after we read the book.

 

At first, I didn't watch war movies and westerns as they historically have not been my first choice for genres.  Ironic, because those account together for over 50% of Mr. Peck's career.  Obviously, I could not consider myself a Gregory Peck fan and not see these films.

 

And actually, a lot of my favourite actors and actresses made westerns and war films. 

 

 

Mr. Peck was the first AFI president, he was president of the Academy, he was an Academy Award winner, and he won the Jean Hersholt award for Humanitarianism.

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Favorite Gregory Peck Films

 

 

To Kill a Mockingbird

Cape Fear

Guns of Navarone

Twelve O'Clock High

On the Beach

Spellbound

Keys of the Kingdom

The Gunfighter

Gentleman's Agreement

Roman Holiday

The Big Country

 

not necessarily in that order, but close. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Favorite Gregory Peck Films

 

 

To Kill a Mockingbird

Cape Fear

Guns of Navarone

Twelve O'Clock High

On the Beach

Spellbound

Keys of the Kingdom

The Gunfighter

Gentleman's Agreement

Roman Holiday

The Big Country

 

not necessarily in that order, but close. 

Thanks for your list of favourites - Canadian spelling, don't you know :)

 

I have copes of several of these movies.  I have to be in the right mood to watch Gentlemen's Agreement.

 

On The Beach I have to be in the right mood to watch too.  Excellent film, and very much relevant to today's world.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Favorite Gregory Peck films in chronological order:

 

"Spellbound" (1945)

 

"The Paradine Case" (1947)

 

"Only the Valiant" (1951)

 

"Roman Holiday" (1953)

 

"On The Beach" (1959)

 

"The Guns of Navarone" (1961)

 

"To Kill A Mockingbird" (1962)

 

"The Stalking Moon" (1969)

 

"MacKenna's Gold" (1969)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Favorite Gregory Peck films in chronological order:

 

"Spellbound" (1945)

 

"The Paradine Case" (1947)

 

"Only the Valiant" (1951)

 

"Roman Holiday" (1953)

 

"On The Beach" (1959)

 

"The Guns of Navarone" (1961)

 

"To Kill A Mockingbird" (1962)

 

"The Stalking Moon" (1969)

 

"MacKenna's Gold" (1969)

I saw Only the Valiant for the first time this month on Youtube.  Thanks for the heads up.

 

The Stalking Moon is a Hitchcockian western I recently re-watched.

 

The Paradine Case is a tricky film.  I have to pretend that Hitchcock did not direct this movie to enjoy it properly.  It was really taken over by Selznick totally. 

 

MacKenna's Gold is an interesting choice.  I enjoy it a lot as a guilty pleasure, but it didn't do well by box office or critics due to having a large part of it cut due to length. It was meant to be another epic western like How the West Was Won, but by then this sub-genre wasn't doing so well, so a vital storyline was cut down to essentially two scenes.  The character Edward G. Robinson plays and his memory of the gold is the key to the whole search party looking for the gold.  This makes it a bit choppy.  Julie Newmar was busy making this movie, so she could not appear in  the big screen adaptation of Batman as Catwoman again.  So Lee Meriweather took over the role.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw Gregory Peck at the show quite a few times during the '60s, my favourite Peck film being The Guns of Navarone.

 

Some years later I was even one of the three people that went to see Mackenna's Gold. I remember sitting in that big empty theatre and getting a big kick out of that all star western (Anyone remember the main title song in it, "Old Turkey Buzzard", sung by Jose Feliciano?)

 

Some time around then I sent Peck a fan letter and received an autographed photo of him in return. I still can't tell if it's his real autograph or just machine stamped on. Well, I never did toss the pix, just in case it's the real thing.

 

I've always liked Gregory Peck, appreciating the integrity (similar to Gary Cooper) that he brought to his roles. He had his limitations as an actor, but when cast in a role that was ideal for him (The Big Country, for example, or To Kill a Mockingbird, of course) it's difficult to envision anyone else being his better.

 

Atticus Finch, if no other role, has given him a strong degree of film immortality.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw Gregory Peck at the show quite a few times during the '60s, my favourite Peck film being The Guns of Navarone.

 

Some years later I was even one of the three people that went to see Mackenna's Gold. I remember sitting in that big empty theatre and getting a big kick out of that all star western (Anyone remember the main title song in it, "Old Turkey Buzzard", sung by Jose Feliciano?)

 

Some time around then I sent Peck a fan letter and received an autographed photo of him in return. I still can't tell if it's his real autograph or just machine stamped on. Well, I never did toss the pix, just in case it's the real thing.

 

I've always liked Gregory Peck, appreciating the integrity (similar to Gary Cooper) that he brought to his roles. He had his limitations as an actor, but when cast in a role that was ideal for him (The Big Country, for example, or To Kill a Mockingbird, of course) it's difficult to envision anyone else being his better.

 

Atticus Finch, if no other role, has given him a strong degree of film immortality.

Lucky you to get an autographed photo!

 

So you were one of the few to see to see Mackenna's Gold on the big screen, huh?  I love the song "Old Turkey Buzzard."  I am quite familiar with it outside of the movie because it was a big favourite of David Letterman and he often showed a clip of the song on his show.

 

Regarding how he was cast, I understand he did film several scenes showing MacArthur's darker side, but it was decided that movie audiences did not want to see him do these scenes.

 

And people often look at a film like The Boys from Brazil and wonder why he made that movie.  Well, Olivier wanted to play the good guy in this film, and Gregory Peck wanted to work with Olivier.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your list of favourites - Canadian spelling, don't you know :)

 

I have copes of several of these movies.  I have to be in the right mood to watch Gentlemen's Agreement.

 

On The Beach I have to be in the right mood to watch too.  Excellent film, and very much relevant to today's world.

 

I'm a fan of Peck and he my top 13 favorite actor of the studio-era.   I'll list my favorite films of him soon.

 

Question:  What do you think of the criticism that Peck was stiff or wooden?  (some would also add boring).   Of course Peck had a very different acting style then someone like James Cagney but I just wonder what your POV is related to this.    It is a topic that was discussed in another thread before you came on the scene.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a fan of Peck and he my top 13 favorite actor of the studio-era.   I'll list my favorite films of him soon.

 

Question:  What do you think of the criticism that Peck was stiff or wooden?  (some would also add boring).   Of course Peck had a very different acting style then someone like James Cagney but I just wonder what your POV is related to this.    It is a topic that was discussed in another thread before you came on the scene.  

 

Acting style is quite an important aspect to how one sees anyone's films.

 

Before talking about Gregory Peck specifically, a lot of people talk about there being a before-Brando and after Brando acting style.  He has influenced a lot of actors.  For me, I see his acting style  - at least as he aged - to be over the top, that his idea of reading cards off of people instead of memorizing dialogue lazy and that he should have looked at the overall film quality rather than himself and been there for his co-stars during their close-ups.

 

Before Brando, the movie actor who was admired by all his peers was Spencer Tracy, completely opposite to Brando.  He knew all his dialogue, he didn't like doing several takes, he was on time and expected people to be on time, and he was always a professional.  His co-stars on Bad day at Black Rock were intimidated and in awe.

 

Back to Peck:

 

I don't find him ever wooden or boring.  But there are movies where he looks uncomfortable in his role.  He was uncomfortable in Boys From Brazil, as I've said.  I'm not sure why he made The Omen or Walk the Line, either. 

 

The movie he considered to be his worst was Only the Valiant.  I had avoided watching this until I had seen most of his movies because of this. Having seen it -produced by Cagney's brother, no less, - I can see why he didn't like it.  His character has nothing to do most of the time.  If it were real life, he would have told everyone that it was the commanding officer who insisted that Gig Young go on a suicide mission and not some revenge because they were in love with the same girl.  But then there wouldn't be a movie.    

 

Peck had tragedy in his life, and he never shied away from it. I think that all good actors and actresses have at least some personal quality of them appear in high quality films.  They also need to be healthy to make high quality films on a long term basis.

 

The comparison to Gary Cooper is apt.  Joel McCrea is another one. 

 

James Cagney could play all kinds of characters and was comfortable in most of the roles he played.  He stands out as one of the few actors asked to do blackface who refused.  He was put on suspension for this.  Had been forced to do blackface these movies would have been horrible I think.  I think the fact that he hated blackface would have showed.  He was a real tour de force.

Edited by GregoryPeckfan
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peck did THE OMEN for the same reason a lot of older stars were making genre films: For the money and for the work. A lot of these guys and gals were getting on in years by the 1970s, and starring roles in A-list pictures were few and far between. Supernatural horror was more acceptable than anytime since the 1930s, thanks to the earlier success of ROSEMARY'S BABY and THE EXORCIST. THE OMEN was a big-budget, high-profile film, and ended up being very successful as well, one of the biggest hits of Peck's career, and it helped secure him financially in his later years.

I've always had mixed feelings about it. Parts are well made, and most of the performances are fine, including Peck. If he was uncomfortable making it, that just added to his acting, since his character was supposed to be conflicted and upset most of the time. And THE OMEN is much less embarrassing than some of the other horror/sci-fi/fantasy films his peers were appearing in, like Henry Fonda in TENTACLES, or Kirk Douglas in HOLOCAUST 2000.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peck did THE OMEN for the same reason a lot of older stars were making genre films: For the money and for the work. A lot of these guys and gals were getting on in years by the 1970s, and starring roles in A-list pictures were few and far between. Supernatural horror was more acceptable than anytime since the 1930s, thanks to the earlier success of ROSEMARY'S BABY and THE EXORCIST. THE OMEN was a bid-budget, high-profile film, and ended up being very successful as well, one of the biggest hits of Peck's career, and it helped secure him financially in his later years.

 

I've always had mixed feelings about it. Parts are well made, and most of the performances are fine, including Peck. If he was uncomfortable making it, that just added to his acting, since his character was supposed to be conflicted and upset most of the time. And THE OMEN is much less embarrassing than some of the other horror/sci-fi/fantasy films his peers were appearing in, like Henry Fonda in TENTACLES, or Kirk Douglas in HOLOCAUST 2000.

I haven't tried watching Tentacles or Holocaust 2000.  I will never try to see either The Exorcist or Rosemary's Baby as I am not enough of a fan of the people in it to watch them.  I do usually watch John Cassavetes movies, though.

 

I know what you mean about horror films having great classic stars.  I've seen Whatever Happened to Baby Jane, What's the Matter with Helen, and some others for the stars.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The films Peck is in that are my favorite are:

 

Roman Holiday

 

Cape Fear (the original)

 

The Big Country

 

The Gunfighter

 

Spellbound

 

To Kill A Mockingbird

 

Twelve O'clock High

 

Designing Women

 

The Macomber Affair

 

The Yearling

 

On The Beach

 

The Guns of Navarone

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The films Peck is in that are my favorite are:

 

Roman Holiday

 

Cape Films

 

The Big Country

 

The Gunfighter

 

Spellbound

 

To Kill A Mockingbird

 

Twelve O'clock High

 

Designing Women

 

The Macomber Affair

 

The Yearling

 

On The Beach

 

The Guns of Navarone

Thanks for your list.

 

I think you mean that you like both Cape Fear movies?  I love the original.  The remake I saw for Peck and Mitchum and I understand it was closer to the book, but it didn't impress me as much.  Peck was great as the lawyer, though.

 

Regarding the first Cape Fear vs. the remake:It terrifies me.  I found Robert Mitchum much more frightening than Deniro in the remake - to me, Mitchum has a suave charm to make everyone believe he's not a bad guy. People like the DeNiro version somehow make you want to avoid them in the first place- everyone.   I've known violent men and try to stay far away from them as possible if I can.  But others have a way of charming people into thinking that they are protectors, rather than attackers.  These people are somehow more frightening, because no one believes you.

 

 

 

The Yearling is a difficult film for me to watch because of what the ending has to be.   I watch it when it is on tv, and that is about it.  It is a beautiful film about how farmers really can't have pets other than dogs or cats.  It makes me glad I am not a farmer.  It is a sweet film that is terribly sad. 

 

Few people have The Macomber Affair as one of their favourites.  It is rarely seen.  I enjoy it a lot.  Interesting to see Robert Preston in a bad guy role.

 

Others films already mentioned I won't go into too much now.

 

I did just re-watch The Gunfighter .  I was going to watch a film I hadn't seen before that I would delete afterwards.  But then, I decided to watch one of my favourites instead. What a surprise.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, so after telling myself I was going to be practical about how my PVR recording percentage keeps getting higher and a lot with titles I won't delete if I enjoy the stars so I should start watching new to me movies that I'd delete after watching them...

 

 

I decided to watch The Gunfighter again. :)  :lol:

 

 

I did watch Frenchman's Creek later last night though.

 

 

TCM is airing a 100th birthday tribute to Mr. Peck on what would have ben his actual birthday.  Sadly, this appears to be a Tuesday night and I will have choir. :(

 

Looks like I will have to record about  everything they air and accept the fact that my PVR will never have Greg titles deleted unless I own them on DVD...unless they are the aforementioned WEIRD movies mentioned before

;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your list.

 

I think you mean that you like both Cape Fear movies?  I love the original.  The remake I saw for Peck and Mitchum and I understand it was closer to the book, but it didn't impress me as much.  Peck was great as the lawyer, though.

 

Regarding the first Cape Fear vs. the remake:It terrifies me.  I found Robert Mitchum much more frightening than Deniro in the remake - to me, Mitchum has a suave charm to make everyone believe he's not a bad guy. People like the DeNiro version somehow make you want to avoid them in the first place- everyone.   I've known violent men and try to stay far away from them as possible if I can.  But others have a way of charming people into thinking that they are protectors, rather than attackers.  These people are somehow more frightening, because no one believes you.

 

 

 

The Yearling is a difficult film for me to watch because of what the ending has to be.   I watch it when it is on tv, and that is about it.  It is a beautiful film about how farmers really can't have pets other than dogs or cats.  It makes me glad I am not a farmer.  It is a sweet film that is terribly sad. 

 

Few people have The Macomber Affair as one of their favourites.  It is rarely seen.  I enjoy it a lot.  Interesting to see Robert Preston in a bad guy role.

 

Others films already mentioned I won't go into too much now.

 

I did just re-watch The Gunfighter .  I was going to watch a film I hadn't seen before that I would delete afterwards.  But then, I decided to watch one of my favourites instead. What a surprise.

 

Yes, I meant to say Cape Fear (the original).     Great film and while Mitchum dominates the film Peck is fine in his role.

 

As for The Yearling;   funny but you're very similar to my wife.    We were watching the film (her for the first time), and as the plot moved forward she asked me 'hey is something going to happen to that animal?'.   I replied 'you want me to tell you what is going to happen?'.   She said 'you know how I feel about this'.   I did and told her she should go read a book!

 

Also,  great comments about Peck's acting style.   Sometimes folks get defensive when asked such a question about an actor they love but you didn't and that was very refreshing.     As you noted,  actors have different styles and film personas.   When a producer matches these characteristics to that of the character in the screenplay and there is a great 'fit' we have movie magic.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I meant to say Cape Fear (the original).     Great film and while Mitchum dominates the film Peck is fine in his role.

 

As for The Yearling;   funny but you're very similar to my wife.    We were watching the film (her for the first time), and as the plot moved forward she asked me 'hey is something going to happen to that animal?'.   I replied 'you want me to tell you what is going to happen?'.   She said 'you know how I feel about this'.   I did and told her she should go read a book!

 

Also,  great comments about Peck's acting style.   Sometimes folks get defensive when asked such a question about an actor they love but you didn't and that was very refreshing.     As you noted,  actors have different styles and film personas.   When a producer matches these characteristics to that of the character in the screenplay and there is a great 'fit' we have movie magic.  

Part of that comes with age I think.  I'm older than I was.  Also, Peck has been gone for some time. 

 

Thanks for the compliment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The Yearling is a difficult film for me to watch because of what the ending has to be.   I watch it when it is on tv, and that is about it.  It is a beautiful film about how farmers really can't have pets other than dogs or cats.  It makes me glad I am not a farmer.  It is a sweet film that is terribly sad. 

.

 

The Yearling has been on many times in the past couple of years and I'd like to see it, but it's an animal movie and I just know how it'll end and I don't know if I can handle it.  I've always wanted to see Old Yeller and I know how that one ends and I just can't handle it.  Sad animal movies are about as much as I can take.  I can watch a sad person movie and be involved and compelled in the story, but have it not affect me, but a sad animal movie... forget it! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Yearling has been on many times in the past couple of years and I'd like to see it, but it's an animal movie and I just know how it'll end and I don't know if I can handle it.  I've always wanted to see Old Yeller and I know how that one ends and I just can't handle it.  Sad animal movies are about as much as I can take.  I can watch a sad person movie and be involved and compelled in the story, but have it not affect me, but a sad animal movie... forget it! 

I saw it because I want to see all Gregory Peck movies.

 

But I've never seen Old Yeller.  You can't make me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll admit that I haven't seen a ton of Gregory Peck's films, but I've enjoyed the films of his that I've seen.  I'll also admit that my initial impression of Peck was that he was a bit stiff and wooden.  However, the more of his films that I've seen and the more I've learned about him as a person, the more that I appreciate and enjoy his work.

 

I love Roman Holiday.  Of the films of Peck's that I've seen, Roman Holiday is definitely my favorite.  He played off of Audrey Hepburn and Eddie Albert so well and he is very enjoyable in this role.  I especially enjoyed reading about how he felt that this was Hepburn's film and insisted on her receiving top billing.  After that film, he and Hepburn were lifelong friends.  

 

He was also excellent in SpellboundThe Snows of Kilimanjaro and To Kill a Mockingbird.  In many of the clips of Peck that I've seen on You Tube, he was a class act and had a great voice.

 

I look forward to seeing more Gregory Peck films. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll admit that I haven't seen a ton of Gregory Peck's films, but I've enjoyed the films of his that I've seen.  I'll also admit that my initial impression of Peck was that he was a bit stiff and wooden.  However, the more of his films that I've seen and the more I've learned about him as a person, the more that I appreciate and enjoy his work.

 

I love Roman Holiday.  Of the films of Peck's that I've seen, Roman Holiday is definitely my favorite.  He played off of Audrey Hepburn and Eddie Albert so well and he is very enjoyable in this role.  I especially enjoyed reading about how he felt that this was Hepburn's film and insisted on her receiving top billing.  After that film, he and Hepburn were lifelong friends.  

 

He was also excellent in SpellboundThe Snows of Kilimanjaro and To Kill a Mockingbird.  In many of the clips of Peck that I've seen on You Tube, he was a class act and had a great voice.

 

I look forward to seeing more Gregory Peck films. 

His films air quite often on TCM and not just the most famous ones.

 

I still haven't found a copy of the TV movie The Portrait and I haven't seen The Amazing Grace and Chuck.

 

Other than that, I've seen all his movies.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gregory Peck is one of my favourites as well, along with James Mason, Burt Lancaster, James Cagney, Sidney Poitier and a few others.

 

Guns of Navarone is definitely tops and The Yearling (gut wrencher but he so beautifully plays the Father with empathy and grace) and who can forget him in To Kill a Mockingbird? I also really like his suave and reserved acting in The Big Country, particularly the tension displayed with Charlton Heston's role...love the donnybrook at dawn!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gregory Peck is one of my favourites as well, along with James Mason, Burt Lancaster, James Cagney, Sidney Poitier and a few others.

 

Guns of Navarone is definitely tops and The Yearling (gut wrencher but he so beautifully plays the Father with empathy and grace) and who can forget him in To Kill a Mockingbird? I also really like his suave and reserved acting in The Big Country, particularly the tension displayed with Charlton Heston's role...love the donnybrook at dawn!

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

 

Harper Lee who wrote To Kill a Mockingbird has just died at 89.

 

He and Charlton Heston got along very well on the set of The Big Country.

 

I'm a fan of the other men you mention too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoy GP when he plays the nice guy / hero like in "To Kill a Mockingbird" and "Guns of Navarone" but really get a kick out of when he can pull off being not so nice like in "Moby Dick" and "Twelve O'Clock High" and even "The Boys From Brazil".

Kinda like Henry Fonda in "Once Upon a Time in the West".

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us