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Harper Lee Dead at 89: Authour of To Kill A Mockingbird

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I was about to create this thread,  just heard the news of her passing on WSAZ Channel 3.

 

harper.jpg

 

 

Made into one of the best movie dramas of the early 1960's

 

694008.gif

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Isn't it amazing how such an unpretentious person became a worldwide celebrity portrayed in films by three different actresses? In addition to Mary Badham's Oscar-nominated performance as Scout (based on Lee) in "To Kill a Mockingbird," the author was portrayed by:

 

(1) Catherine Keener, who earned a 2005 Best Supporting Actress nomination as Lee (opposite Oscar winner Philip Seymour Hoffman) in "Capote."

13capo.2.650.jpg

 

And (2) Sandra Bullock was Lee in the 2006 film "Infamous," which co-starred British actor Toby Jones as Truman Capote.

2006_infamous_045.jpg

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Isn't it amazing how such an unpretentious person became a worldwide celebrity portrayed in films by three different actresses? In addition to Mary Badham's Oscar-nominated performance as Scout (based on Lee) in "To Kill a Mockingbird," the author was portrayed by:

 

(1) Catherine Keener, who earned a 2005 Best Supporting Actress nomination as Lee (opposite Oscar winner Philip Seymour Hoffman) in "Capote."

13capo.2.650.jpg

 

And (2) Sandra Bullock was Lee in the 2006 film -- "Infamous," which co-starred Toby Jones as Truman Capote.

2006_infamous_045.jpg

I would like to see both of these movies.

 

Thanks for these.

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I was about to create this thread,  just heard the news of her passing on WSAZ Channel 3.

 

harper.jpg

 

 

Made into one of the best movie dramas of the early 1960's

 

694008.gif

I read about it on imdb while looking up today's birthdays for my Feb. birthday thread. 

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Obviously, this is big news in my life.

 

To Kill a Mockingbird Author Harper Lee Dead at 89:

 

http://variety.com/2016/film/news/harper-lee-dead-dies-kill-a-mockingbird-author-1201710486/

 

 

I've not read the other book.  I do not want to read it. 

GPF, pardon me for being so nosy but I'm just so curious about why you do not want to read the "other book" as you put it.

 

If I am invading your privacy, please forgive me but if you feel open to explaining this attitude I would love to hear it.

 

I've not read the "other book" either but was a bit intrigued when it came out recently.

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GPF, pardon me for being so nosy but I'm just so curious about why you do not want to read the "other book" as you put it.

 

If I am invading your privacy, please forgive me but if you feel open to explaining this attitude I would love to hear it.

 

I've not read the "other book" either but was a bit intrigued when it came out recently.

I was intrigued myself until I saw the recent spotlight on Southern writers with fellow Southern writer John Grisham introducing and concluding the series. 

 

In the new book-written before To Kill a Mockingbird-Atticus Finch is an old man and a racist.  The book To Kill a Mockingbird was based on flashback scenes within the originally written script.

 

I would read the book if I had to for a class, but I am no longer a student.  When I met Shoeless Joe author (Field of Dreams)W.P. Kinsella at a Young Authors Conference in grade 12, he told us something valuable about reading famous books.

 

He told us that if you have been assigned a book to read in a class/report etc. you must read it no matter what you think  of it.

 

But if you are reading the book for your entertainment, if you can't get into the book within the first 20 or 30 pages, put the book down.  Don't read something you can't enjoy simply because you bought it, etc.

 

I know the book exists.  But I want my memory of the character of Atticus Finch to reflect Gregory Peck's portrayal.

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Harper Lee was an invaluable friend and assistant to Truman Capote when he was writing In Cold Blood in Kansas. She was able to do some interviews and research that would have been difficult for him to obtain.

 

I graduated from the University of Kansas and I was very fortunate to attend a lecture by Truman Capote there. You can take my word for it that Philip Seymour Hoffman really deserved that Oscar.

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Harper Lee was an invaluable friend and assistant to Truman Capote when he was writing In Cold Blood in Kansas. She was able to do some interviews and research that would have been difficult for him to obtain.

 

I graduated from the University of Kansas and I was very fortunate to attend a lecture by Truman Capote there. You can take my word for it that Philip Seymour Hoffman really deserved that Oscar.

I wish I had seen this movie before Hoffman died.  I has been long on my to-see list.

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I just finished Harper Lee's other book.  It's very well-written and quite a nuanced portrait of Southern attitudes about race.  Yes, Atticus is a racist, but somehow saying that does a disservice to the complexity of his character and of race relations as depicted in the book.  It's also the preception of a small Southern town by Jean Louise (Scout) who is now on her 20s.  So, her perception of her father as an adult is different from what it would have been as a child.  It's not a great book, but a very good one.   I'm still not sure what to make of the ending; it's full of ambiguity.

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I just finished Harper Lee's other book.  It's very well-written and quite a nuanced portrait of Southern attitudes about race.  Yes, Atticus is a racist, but somehow saying that does a disservice to the complexity of his character and of race relations as depicted in the book.  It's also the preception of a small Southern town by Jean Louise (Scout) who is now on her 20s.  So, her perception of her father as an adult is different from what it would have been as a child.  It's not a great book, but a very good one.   I'm still not sure what to make of the ending; it's full of ambiguity.

Just because I don't want to read the book does not mean it is not well written.

 

The reason why a lot of fans were upset by it is that it was written BEFORE To Kill a Mockingbird.

 

I know all about the complexities of characters and racists in books set in towns with racism.

 

That does not mean I want to read the book for pleasure.

 

I already said that I read lots of unpleasant books for classes and research.

 

I associate the character of Atticus Finch with the man who portrayed him.

 

Gregory Peck was not a racist. 

 

Yes, he played one in The Boys From Brazil.

 

I stand by my statement that I would only read the book for a class and no other reason.  Since I`m not in a class I do not have to read it.

 

And as I said before, I agree with what W.P. Kinsella told me at the Writers Conference about what to do when reading books for one`s own enjoyment.

 

I was answering a question from one of the posters to this thread who wanted to know why I wasn`t interested in reading the other book.

 

Perhaps if I had not seen the discussion on Southern Writers I might have bought the book, but I still would not have completed it likely.

 

Nobody said you had to agree with anything I said.

 

I posted this thread because for me, the death of Harper Lee is likely Gregory Peck dying all over again.  His grandchild is named after her.

 

 

 

Look at my moniker.

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imagesto-kill-a-mockingbird.jpg

This reminds me about the Get Fuzzy comic strip in which Bucky is reading To Kill a Mockingbird and is told that "it not a cookbook."

 

Bucky replies that "I thought it was..off topic."

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I'm sorry to hear about Harper Lee.  I read To Kill a Mockingbird in the 9th grade for Humanities class and I enjoyed the book very much.  It was the only book in high school that we were assigned that I actually finished.  I switched to Writing classes (instead of Literature classes) as soon as I was able, because I could avoid reading the boring books we were assigned.

 

Like I said, I enjoyed To Kill a Mockingbird and didn't find it boring or tedious to to read.  It was well written and interesting.  In light of Lee's passing, I would like to see the film and read the book again.  

 

I'm interested in her more recent novel, Go Set a Watchman as well.  I feel like I need to read To Kill a Mockingbird and follow it up with 'Watchman.'  I've always found it interesting how Lee achieved so much celebrity and notoriety and she only wrote one novel.  

 

RIP Harper Lee. 

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I'm sorry to hear about Harper Lee.  I read To Kill a Mockingbird in the 9th grade for Humanities class and I enjoyed the book very much.  It was the only book in high school that we were assigned that I actually finished.  I switched to Writing classes (instead of Literature classes) as soon as I was able, because I could avoid reading the boring books we were assigned.

 

Like I said, I enjoyed To Kill a Mockingbird and didn't find it boring or tedious to to read.  It was well written and interesting.  In light of Lee's passing, I would like to see the film and read the book again.  

 

I'm interested in her more recent novel, Go Set a Watchman as well.  I feel like I need to read To Kill a Mockingbird and follow it up with 'Watchman.'  I've always found it interesting how Lee achieved so much celebrity and notoriety and she only wrote one novel.  

 

RIP Harper Lee. 

There were lots of books I read in school because we assigned to them that I might not otherwise have read.  We did have reading lists for some where we were allowed to choose which book we read among a short list and others we had to read.

 

One book I remember reading that falls under the category of book I hated was in grade 11.  It was Lord of the Flies.  Apparently, I was the only one in the entire grade 11 population of over 300 students in my school to realize automatically that it was full of symbolism.  I wrote a paper on it.  People thought I was crazy.  Then when our teacher explained that it was indeed symbolic, they said he was crazy.

 

I love all kinds of books.  When I read for fun they tend to be mysteries rather than social commentaries.  I always feel like I need to write a book report otherwise.

 

I wish this other book was written AFTER To Kill a Mockingbird instead of being the first draft of To Kill a Mockingbird.  I know it seems odd but it would have made a big difference.

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There were lots of books I read in school because we assigned to them that I might not otherwise have read.  We did have reading lists for some where we were allowed to choose which book we read among a short list and others we had to read.

 

One book I remember reading that falls under the category of book I hated was in grade 11.  It was Lord of the Flies.  Apparently, I was the only one in the entire grade 11 population of over 300 students in my school to realize automatically that it was full of symbolism.  I wrote a paper on it.  People thought I was crazy.  Then when our teacher explained that it was indeed symbolic, they said he was crazy.

 

I love all kinds of books.  When I read for fun they tend to be mysteries rather than social commentaries.  I always feel like I need to write a book report otherwise.

 

I wish this other book was written AFTER To Kill a Mockingbird instead of being the first draft of To Kill a Mockingbird.  I know it seems odd but it would have made a big difference.

 

Apparently in 11th grade Literature, the assigned book was The Great Gatsby, but I took Advanced Writing instead, so I never read it.  I finally read TGG a few years ago and I really enjoyed it, so I suppose not all books were bad.  We were also assigned The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in 10th grade and I didn't hate the book, but I never finished it.  I should finish it-- 16 years later, lol. 

 

When I read, I tend to read non-fiction because I like learning.  In between non-fiction books, I read Nancy Drew just to break up the monotony.  I don't know why I didn't read Nancy Drew when I was the age range that these books were meant for, but I'm reading them now and they're fun stories.  I just finished reading Tinsletown: Murder, Morphine and Madness about the cold-case murder of William Desmond Taylor in 1922. Then I read Nancy Drew #9, The Sign of the Twisted Candles and #10 The Password to Larkspur Lane.  Now, I'm reading Fred Astaire's autobiography, Steps in Time.  When I'm finished I'm going to read Nancy Drew #12 The Mystery of the Hollow Oak and #13 The Mystery of the Ivory Charm.  I am not sure what I'll start reading afterward, I'm thinking maybe Valley of the Dolls.  For some reason though, I find it harder to get through fiction books than I do non-fiction.  It must be my insatiable appetite for learning that gets in the way.

 

Re: Go Set a Watchman and To Kill a Mockingbird.  I was listening to NPR on the way home and they were doing a retrospective about Harper Lee.  They mentioned that she originally wrote GSAW as a first draft and TKAM was a flashback of sorts.  One of the reporters that contributed to the story stated that she asked Lee if she intended for GSAW to be published and Lee stated "Don't be silly. Of course I did." I am curious why Lee waited 50+ years later to release the follow up to her novel.  I agree that it's a shame that GSAW wasn't released prior to TKAM.  It's almost as if Lee wanted to destory the image of Atticus Finch.  I'm not sure though.  I'll need to read the two books back to back and see what I think. 

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Heh!

 

We were never assigned books to read in MY high school.  Just assigned to read books and either write reports or do them orally.

 

Back about that time( and a bit earlier), I read and was largely affected by John Howard Griffin's "Black Like Me", recommended by my older step sister.  I followed that up with TKAM, and was knocked on my AZZ!

 

It wasn't only Lee's gentle and engaging prose that moved me, but her ability to conjure rich and detailed visual images that warmed me to the book as well.  I could, while reading, almost smell the sultry Alabama summer evenings.

 

I always felt robbed that Lee only published(until recently) just one book.  But MY  WHAT a book!  I haven't yet read the newer one either.  Looking forward to it.

 

But again, both MOCKINGBIRD and BLACK LIKE ME did a lot to form my adolescent mind's feelings on "race" relations and such.  Of course, those impressions did last, so far, a lifetime.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Not at all looking to derail the thread here, but I just feel compelled, as someone who has seen both INFAMOUS (2006) and CAPOTE (2005), to share my very firm opinion that neither film is all that great

 

BUT :

 

Toby Jones IS Truman Capote in INFAMOUS.

 

ACTOR OF OUR GENERATION Phillip Seymour Hoffman is, as always, playing Phillip Seymour Hoffman in a Phillip Seymour Hoffman film, giving a performance, for your consideration as Truman Capote.

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Make that four actresses who have portrayed Harper Lee!  In the 1998 USA Network TV movie "Scandalous Me: The Jacqueline Susann Story," Canada's Tracey Hoyt made a brief appearance as Lee. The biography starred Michele Lee as Susann.

 

traceyharperlee.png

Tracey Hoyt as Harper Lee

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Not at all looking to derail the thread here, but I just feel compelled, as someone who has seen both INFAMOUS (2006) and CAPOTE (2005), to share my very firm opinion that neither film is all that great

 

BUT :

 

Toby Jones IS Truman Capote in INFAMOUS.

 

ACTOR OF OUR GENERATION Phillip Seymour Hoffman is, as always, playing Phillip Seymour Hoffman in a Phillip Seymour Hoffman film, giving a performance, for your consideration as Truman Capote.

I do not consider this derailing the thread as she and Capote were friends and he is the basis of Dill in To Kill a Mockingbird.

 

 

I haven't seen either movie about capote, but I have seen In Cold Blood which as Jakeem says was helped a great deal in research by Lee. 

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I wasn't pos

 

Just because I don't want to read the book does not mean it is not well written.

 

The reason why a lot of fans were upset by it is that it was written BEFORE To Kill a Mockingbird.

 

I know all about the complexities of characters and racists in books set in towns with racism.

 

That does not mean I want to read the book for pleasure.

 

I already said that I read lots of unpleasant books for classes and research.

 

I associate the character of Atticus Finch with the man who portrayed him.

 

Gregory Peck was not a racist. 

 

Yes, he played one in The Boys From Brazil.

 

I stand by my statement that I would only read the book for a class and no other reason.  Since I`m not in a class I do not have to read it.

 

And as I said before, I agree with what W.P. Kinsella told me at the Writers Conference about what to do when reading books for one`s own enjoyment.

 

I was answering a question from one of the posters to this thread who wanted to know why I wasn`t interested in reading the other book.

 

Perhaps if I had not seen the discussion on Southern Writers I might have bought the book, but I still would not have completed it likely.

 

Nobody said you had to agree with anything I said.

 

I posted this thread because for me, the death of Harper Lee is likely Gregory Peck dying all over again.  His grandchild is named after her.

 

 

 

Look at my moniker.

I wasn't posting this to disagree with you, just to share my experience of Go Set a Watchman, which most of the people posting here haven't read.  That doesn't mean you have to read it if you don't want to.  

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I  can't imagine what  Gregory Peck would have thought of the other book.  I think he would be disappointed.

 

Oh, well.

 

Never mind Rosebette. there has been lots of deaths lately, and I'm hoping that the pattern will stop.

 

It probably won't though.

 

 

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