LawrenceA

A Humphrey Bogart Thread

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In this thread I'd like to discuss the films of Humphrey Bogart. My personal favorite star of the Golden Era, he exuded cool and tough guy charm, despite coming from a pampered, prep-school-and-country-club background. He toiled away in bit parts and minor heavy roles for a decade, traveling between Hollywood and the New York stage, working to hone his craft, until he finally broke through into the big time with High Sierra in 1941. He remained one of the major stars of the screen for the next 15 years, until his untimely death in 1957 at the age of 57. His legacy has lived on though, as he and his iconic characters have become cornerstones of American culture, as well as in the rest of the world. In 1997, Entertainment Weekly names Bogart the "Greatest Movie Star of All Time." While you may disagree with that assessment, he is my favorite of that bygone era, and one of my favorites of any time.

 

My favorite Humphrey Bogart films:

 

Casablanca (1942)

The Maltese Falcon (1941)

The Big Sleep (1946)

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)

In a Lonely Place (1950)

To Have and Have Not (1944)

High Sierra (1941)

The African Queen (1951)

Key Largo (1948)

The Caine Mutiny (1954)

Dead Reckoning (1947)

The Petrified Forest (1936)

Sahara (1943)

All Through the Night (1941)

They Drive By Night (1940)

 

 

Please list your own favorites, and any other thoughts about Bogart or his work.

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I love that you started this thread!

 

I will be happy to participate in this. 

 

I will need to do my 1932 movies list sometime today, but I couldn't pass up the opportunity to talk Bogie first:

 

 

Bogart is one of those actors whose work I want to see everything he does.

 

Here are favourites of mine in no particular order:

 

The Maltese Falcon

The Big Sleep

To Have and Have Not

Key Largo

The Caine Mutiny

The Petrified Forest

Dark Passage

The African Queen

High Sierra

Across the Pacific

Casablanca

The Wagons Roll at Midnight

They Drive By Night

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

In a Lonely Place

The Roaring Twenties

 

 

In general, even when I don't enjoy the movie such as the case with Black Legion, I still enjoy Bogart.

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There are so many great performances and movies from Bogie, my favorite big names are:

Casablanca

African Queen

The Caine Mutiny

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

High Sierra

 

And favorite lessen knowns:

They Drive By Night

Sahara

Action in the North Atlantic

 

I really like the movie, "The Maltese Falcon," but watching it again the other day Bogie seems a bit too "plastic" and not relating well with the other actors = maybe contrived or one-dimensional.

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Lawrence:

 

How many of the films you've yet to see of Bogart's career are easy to find?

 

I mean, are you at the point similar to I am in terms of how I am/have been in finding Peck films yet to be seen where you really have to search for them, or are there some major ones that just haven't been seen yet due to other reasons than rarity?

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Humphrey Bogart is probably my #3 favorite after Errol Flynn and Gene Kelly.  

 

He's frequently described as resembling a basset hound or being an unconventional looking leading man.  Granted, looks-wise, he wasn't in the same league as Flynn or Cary Grant, but I didn't think he was unattractive.  Granted, by the end of his career, I could see where critics were going with the "basset hound" comparison, but I think it only lent character to his performances.  I actually found him attractive in Casablanca, I'd prefer him to Paul Henreid.  In Three on a Match and The Petrified Forest, I actually found Bogart kind of hot.  Maybe it's the whole bad boy thing.

 

Anyway... superficial comments aside, I really like Bogart.  His New York accent and voice was interesting as was his lisp.  In his films, he's the most interesting person on the screen.  He had a certain something that set him apart from his contemporaries.  I can see why Warner Brothers pigeonholed him into gangster roles early in his career. He did a great job portraying them.  What I love is how in his films, even if he's the toughest guy in the film, he has a certain vulnerability to him.  He's a tough guy with a soft side.  This is even more apparent in his post-High Sierra career when he was frequently cast as a romantic leading man.  In Casablanca, for example, even though Bogart is supposed to be the tough, cynical, no nonsense Rick Blaine, he turns into mush once former flame, Ingrid Bergman enters the picture.  In Dark Passage, he's on the lam trying to clear his name.  ***spoiler alert*** the end of the film, when he meets Lauren Bacall in the Peruvian bar is one of the most romantic scenes in his career.  ***end spoiler alert*** 

 

These are my favorite Bogart films:

 

Casablanca

Dark Passage

To Have and Have Not

The Big Sleep 

Key Largo

In a Lonely Place

Sabrina

Treasure of the Sierra Madre

The Maltese Falcon

The African Queen

The Petrified Forest

Three on a Match (Even if he doesn't have a large role)

Beat the Devil (This film is bonkers, but I enjoyed it)

They Drive By Night

High Sierra

Conflict

The Two Mrs. Carrolls

The Harder They Fall

 

The one thing I must say about Bogart, he was not very good at accents.  His Irish accent in Dark Victory and Mexican accent in Virginia City is awful.  

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I always like reading about the contentious relationship between Bogart and George Raft. Raft was a real tough-guy, and he resented Bogart as far back as the mid-30s, when Bogart had success on the stage with PETRIFIED FOREST. Raft felt Bogart was a preppy phony, and he hated how Bogart got so many tough hood roles. When Bogart got the lead in HIGH SIERRA, it was only after Raft had turned it down. He was livid when the film made Bogart a huge star. Raft then turned down CASABLANCA, and we all know how that turned out. Raft's career never really recovered. I think Speed hit on it. Bogart had a vulnerability visible underneath his facade. Raft didn't. Raft may have been more genuine, but he wasn't half the actor or one quarter the star.

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I always like reading about the contentious relationship between Bogart and George Raft. Raft was a real tough-guy, and he resented Bogart as far back as the mid-30s, when Bogart had success on the stage with PETRIFIED FOREST. Raft felt Bogart was a preppy phony, and he hated how Bogart got so many tough hood roles. When Bogart got the lead in HIGH SIERRA, it was only after Raft had turned it down. He was livid when the film made Bogart a huge star. Raft then turned down CASABLANCA, and we all know how that turned out. Raft's career never really recovered. I think Speed hit on it. Bogart had a vulnerability visible underneath his facade. Raft didn't. Raft may have been more genuine, but he wasn't half the actor or one quarter the star.

Lol.  Obviously Raft was also a really poor judge of scripts too.  

 

Prior to becoming more involved with this board, my only knowledge of Raft was that he was "Spats" in Some Like it Hot.  Raft, in comparison to Bogart, was just so bland.

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Over the years I've pretty well seen all of Bogie's fillms, with a few exceptions prior to The Petrified Forest. I recall that many of them I saw a million years ago when the CBC in Canada had a 51 week Bogart marathon every Wednesday night. It was under those circumstances that (unknown to my parents) I snuck into our basement to watch Bogie on a little black-and-white TV, with the sound really low. Then I'd go to school the next days with my eyes hitting my kneecaps.

 

I guess that Bogart was probably at the peak of his appeal as an (unexpected) sex symbol when he made two films, Casablanca and The Big Sleep (I mean, come on, every woman in that latter film was ready to keel over every time they saw Marlowe).

 

Those two films have two of my favourite Bogart performances, as is pretty much the case with all Bogart fans, I suppose. But I enjoyed seeing Bogie just as much on those occasions when he played against type - Fred C. Dobbs in Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Dixon Steele in In A Lonely Place and Charley Allnut in The African Queen.

 

During his peak period in the '40s he only had the rare misstep as an actor - The Two Mrs. Carrolls comes to mind - but, for the most part, he had as impressive a decade of filmmaking then as any other super star in Hollywood. Heck, thinking about it, he was probably in more really good films during that decade than any other major Hollywood player during that decade.

 

Some have said that the moody, alcoholic, prone to violence Dixon Steele was the closest that Bogart ever came to playing himself. (There was an incident on his yacht in which Bogie blew up that apparently startled and scared Lauren Bacall, though I believe it stopped short of violence). Perhaps that's the reason why he is so chillingly effective in that Nicholas Ray film.

 

Bogie will, of course, be remembered for Casablanca above all other films, but if I had to pick my own favourite film of his career it would be Treasure of the Sierra Madre, which probably has my favourite Bogart performance, as well. "Nobody gets the best of Fred C. Dobbs" - that may be the most famous actual movie line of his career, especially since he never did say "Play it again, Sam."

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I like his more unusual roles, such as Dr. Maurice Xavier (Doctor X), Dixon Steele and, of course, Fred C. Dobbs - the slightly off-center personalities.

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Lol.  Obviously Raft was also a really poor judge of scripts too.  

 

Prior to becoming more involved with this board, my only knowledge of Raft was that he was "Spats" in Some Like it Hot.  Raft, in comparison to Bogart, was just so bland.

I knew a lot about George Raft and the scripts he turned down.

 

I enjoy George Raft in certain films, others I don`t.

 

I never  found Raft sexy.

 

Bogart I find extremely sexy in ways I can`t put into words.

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Lawrence:

 

How many of the films you've yet to see of Bogart's career are easy to find?

 

I mean, are you at the point similar to I am in terms of how I am/have been in finding Peck films yet to be seen where you really have to search for them, or are there some major ones that just haven't been seen yet due to other reasons than rarity?

 

I have seen 59 of the 76 films he made. Of the remaining 17 to see, I have copies of:

 

Big City Blues (1932)

Action in the North Atlantic (1943)

Chain Lightning (1950)

 

Of the other 14, most are from his pre-High Sierra period, with the only exceptions being The Big Shot (1942) and The Enforcer (1951). The other, earlier films are:

 

A Devil with Women (1930)

Body and Soul (1931)

The Bad Sister (1931)

A Holy Terror (1931)

Love Affair (1932)

Two Against the World (1936)

China Clipper (1936)

Isle of Fury (1936)

The Great O'Malley (1937)

Stand-In (1937)

Swing Your Lady (1938)

Racket Busters (1938)

 

I know a couple of those have been shown on TCM, but I'm not certain about the availability of some of the others.

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I have seen 59 of the 76 films he made. Of the remaining 17 to see, I have copies of:

 

Big City Blues (1932)

Action in the North Atlantic (1943)

Chain Lightning (1950)

 

Of the other 14, most are from his pre-High Sierra period, with the only exceptions being The Big Shot (1942) and The Enforcer (1951). The other, earlier films are:

 

A Devil with Women (1930)

Body and Soul (1931)

The Bad Sister (1931)

A Holy Terror (1931)

Love Affair (1932)

Two Against the World (1936)

China Clipper (1936)

Isle of Fury (1936)

The Great O'Malley (1937)

Stand-In (1937)

Swing Your Lady (1938)

Racket Busters (1938)

 

I know a couple of those have been shown on TCM, but I'm not certain about the availability of some of the others.

I've seen Action in the North Atlantic - that will be great action

 

I've seen The Enforcer, but I can't remember much of it.  I know I enjoyed it, but it has ben too long ago since I've seen it.

 

Others that you haven't seen I haven't seen either.

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A Devil with Women (1930)

Body and Soul (1931)

The Bad Sister (1931)

A Holy Terror (1931)

Love Affair (1932)

Two Against the World (1936)

China Clipper (1936)

Isle of Fury (1936)

The Great O'Malley (1937)

Stand-In (1937)

Swing Your Lady (1938)

Racket Busters (1938)

 

I know a couple of those have been shown on TCM, but I'm not certain about the availability of some of the others.

 

Lawrence, since I got TCM 11 years ago, the channel has shown all of those titles except for the first four. Love Affair only had one broadcast, I believe, but all of the others have been on multiple times. There is currently a decent print of The Bad Sister playing on You Tube (with French sub titles on the bottom of the screen).

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A.M. Sperger's Bogart is a pretty good biography of HB.  Stephen Bogart's book on his dad is quite good too.

One of the first film books I ever threw my scant allowance at was Bogey: The Films of Humphrey Bogart (1965) by Clifford McCarthy which had some great pictures, cast lists and a filmography of HB which I used as a check list.  This was way before the imdb.

I still have quite a few to watch.  Some of these I have recorded off of TCM.

Broadway's Like That (1930)

A Devil With Women (1930)

Up the River (1930)

Body and Soul (1931)

Women of All Nations (1931)

A Holy Terror (1931)

Love Affair (1932)

Big City Blues (1932)

Midnight (1934)

Two Against the World (1936)

China Clipper (1936)

Isle of Fury (1936)

The Great O'Malley (1937)

Swing Your Lady (1938)

Men are Such Fools (1938)

Racket Busters (1938)

The Return of Dr. X (1939)

Invisible Stripes (1939)

It All Came True (1940)

Report From the Front (1944)

Conflict (1945)

Hollywood Victory Caravan (1945)

Two Guys From Milwaukee (1946)

Always Together (1948)

Chain Lightning (1950)

Deadline USA (1952)

US Savings Bond Trailer (1952)

The Love Lottery (1954)

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There's a good looking print of The Love Lottery (with Bogie's gag appearance) on You Tube now.

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IT ALL CAME TRUE is an oddball film, oddball as in Humphrey Bogart and ZaSu Pitts in the same movie. Bogart's a criminal hiding out in her boarding house. There's some drama, some comedy, some romance, some vaudeville acts. It's a lot of fun.

 

 

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IT ALL CAME TRUE is an oddball film, oddball as in Humphrey Bogart and ZaSu Pitts in the same movie. Bogart's a criminal hiding out in her boarding house. There's some drama, some comedy, some romance, some vaudeville acts. It's a lot of fun.

 

I'm a fan of the little known It All Came True, as well. Bogie's a gangster once again in this one, but it's a gentle sentimental comedy, in many respects, and quite likeable. One of the best aspects of this film, too, is that it proved to be one of Ann Sheridan's better showcase opportunities, as she gets to belt out a song or two (I don't know if her singing voice was dubbed here).

 

Sheridan and Bogart were pals, ready to pull gags on one another. It's a shame that there is no known footage in existence of Sheridan dressed up as a hooker for what was planned as a surprise on Bogie during the shooting of Treasure of the Sierra Madre. That bit with her never made it into the final film (you can see that it is another actress in that Tampico scene that walks by Bogie giving him a look after he comes out of the barber shop).

 

Interestingly, though, Sheridan had an interview in the '60s in which she talks about that gag bit she did and she thought that her scene WAS in the film. I guess that Annie never saw the movie.

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I have seen almost every film Bogie has been in.   Of course the films folks have listed are some of my favorite films.

 

I would add Marked Women to the list.    While Bette Davis is the star of this film and is just fantastic (the first film she made after her attempt to leave WB and make films in England failed),   Bogie gets a chance to play a good guy (DA),  in the film and is solid.    Really good film with that gritty WB 30s feel and many WB supporting players on hand.

 

 

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I have seen almost every film Bogie has been in.   Of course the films folks have listed are some of my favorite films.

 

I would add Marked Women to the list.    While Bette Davis is the star of this film and is just fantastic (the first film she made after her attempt to leave WB and make films in England failed),   Bogie gets a chance to play a good guy (DA),  in the film and is solid.    Really good film with that gritty WB 30s feel and many WB supporting players on hand.

 

I agree, James. I only just watched this for the first time in the last couple of years, but I really liked it. It's one of my favorite Bette Davis movies of the period, and it's a prime example of why WB was my favorite 30s studio.

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I agree, James. I only just watched this for the first time in the last couple of years, but I really liked it. It's one of my favorite Bette Davis movies of the period, and it's a prime example of why WB was my favorite 30s studio.

 

One interesting line Davis says in the film is 'I'm all f-a-g-g-e-d out'.    The first time I heard this line (about 25 years ago),  I had to look up the word and found out it means being tired or worn out.     Did Davis pick up this lingo while she was in England hiding from Jack's lawyers? 

 

Anyhow,  yea,  Marked Women is a gem of a film that may have fallen off the radar of Davis fans.     Jane Bryant also is great as Davis's younger sister.    Bryant had the makings of a major star but she decided to retire instead.

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Lawrence, since I got TCM 11 years ago, the channel has shown all of those titles except for the first four. Love Affair only had one broadcast, I believe, but all of the others have been on multiple times. There is currently a decent print of The Bad Sister playing on You Tube (with French sub titles on the bottom of the screen).

I've been trying to figure out which year TCM became available here in Canada.

 

Thanks.  11 years...

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Bogie's films during the '50s were hit and miss. But THE ENFORCER is one that I always liked. Not only is Bogart solid in it, but it has a superior supporting cast of character actors, incuding Zero Mostel, Everett Sloane and Ted De Corsia. In fact De Corsia is in one of the most memorable sequences of this hard boiled crime drama. Bretaigne Windust (now there's a name we all talk about all the time, don't we?) got credit as director.

 

But don't you believe he did it. A few days after Windust began directing someone contacted Jack Warner to tell him that all the actors playing gangsters looked like sissies. After taking a look at the rushes, Warner yelled, "Bring in Raoul Walsh. He'll cure that."

 

And cure them he did. Ted De Corsia definitely looks like no sissy in this film. Walsh didn't ask for credit on the film, though, so Windust got it.

 

This was the last time that Bogart was directed by Walsh, even if it was unofficial. Their films together - The Roaring Twenties, They Drive By Night, High Sierra and this one - are a pretty impressive quartet.

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