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LochmereLake

Most Romantic Movie Scene of All Time

32 posts in this topic

Right off the bat,

many scenes in Notorious

some scenes in Casablanca

telephone scene in It's a Wonderful Life

and...

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Repression and self-denial are powerfully romantic in the scene between Walter Pidgeon and Maureen O'Hara in How Green Was My Valley(1941) in the minister's cottage. Pidgeon explains in a fairly elliptical way that he cannot love her, especially since he might kill if the meager life that he could offer her "would bring white to her hair before its time".

 

This scene is beautifully staged and photographed by director John Ford and cinematographer Arthur Miller. For much of the scene the faces of O'Hara and Pidgeon are in darkness, with a single lamp lighting their lower bodies. The two move around the room toward one another and away toward the door as though they are trapped and frightened by the feelings that draw them together. Ah, fear of intimacy--isn't it romantic?!

;)

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"THE CLOCK" -- Judy Garland and Robert Walker at breakfast in a hotel room, the morning after their wedding night, making shy and sly little smiles at each other. It spoke volumes about what happened the night before.

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Speaking of John Ford-"The Quiet Man" was just on TCM,and the shot of John Wayne coming into the cottage and finding Maureen O'Hara there,and taking her hand and whirling her into his arms,staring down at her as she stares back,mesmerised,and then he kisses her-that was hot! The wind howling,the fire flickering,the tension in the air-what a passionate scene.

 

Message was edited by:

daddysprimadonna

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A memorable one is when Heathcliff picks Cathy up from her deathbed and says (if I remember correctly), ?What do they know of Heaven and Hell, Cathy, who know nothing of love!?

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Oh yes,that's a great one. He loved her so much,that he couldn't even wish her to be in heaven-he swore that she wander the heath until they could be joined for eternity.

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A good one, but certainly not the best, is Random Harvest! The whole movie is romance! From the time she becomes his right hand, and suffers through her lifeless existence serving a man who doesn't recognize her to his memory gain and eventual return to their happiest moments together at the cottage. The end is a killer!

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The Quiet Man Maureen O'Hara and Wayne when it starts to rain in the cemetery and they embrace and kiss!

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GM: I share your feelings about "Random Harvest". No matter how often I see it, it's tough to watch without choking up.

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One of my favorites comes from "The Quiet Man" as well. It's the scene in front of the fireplace. Very little dialogue. Watching the fire Maureen puts her head on John's shoulder. Then he lifts her arm to put it around him, her head resting behind his. It plays better than it sounds. To me it's a lovely, intimate moment.

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Any thing Cary Grant was in was romantic to one degree or another with me but Penny Serenade, Mr. Lucky, That Touch of Mink and Notorious are the most romantic to me. I would almost, almost, have been poisoned if I knew Cary would have saved me. Cary Grant was who you hoped would be your date in high school instead of some pimple-faced kid with a pickup.

 

Random Harvest is romantic also. And Goodbye Mr. Chips. I know I'm not giving scene's but there are so many in each movie.

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Gothic romance gets a real workout in MY COUSIN RACHEL the moment that Richard Burton (celebrating his 25th birthday) decides to climb to Olivia de Havilland's balcony so that he can drape her in a priceless jewelry collection, including a tiara. The big love scene before a fireplace is the romantic highlight of the whole piece and their clinch is the payoff to a very, very romantic scene.

 

I may have mentioned this one before, but it made a deep impression on me.

 

It's got to be one of the most romantic scenes from a classic film.

 

Neil

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Here are a few that have not been mentioned yet:

 

So many scenes in Doctor Zhivago that I'd be here all day if I typed them all out. IMO, the single most romantic film ever made.

 

Love Affair - this whole movie is romantic (not to mention better than An Affair to Remember ), but of course, the ending is the best! :D No one does romance better than Charles Boyer, IMO.

 

And speaking of Charles Boyer, another really romantic film is All This and Heaven Too. Nothin' better than heavily felt, but unrealized desire!!!!

 

The last scene of City Lights. The Tramp's vunerable terror-of-rejection-ending-in-joy is just priceless. Chaplin played this perfectly.

 

The last 10 minutes of Captain Blood. Especially that last shot of Errol Flynn and Olivia deHavilland - sooooo romantic!!!!

 

The very last scene of The Sheik, when, after getting critically injured while rescuing her, he wakes up and sees her sitting there holding his hand....and he knows that message in the sand was true.

 

The Shop Around the Corner - the whole premise of this film is romantic.

 

If we are including more modern films, I'd also add Out of Africa and The Bridges of Madison County to the list. I cry buckets of tears every time I watch either of those two films.

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Some of the scenes I am thinking about:

 

On the Waterfront: When Terry breaks down the door and yells at her "you love me!" She shouts back "I didn't say I didn't love you! I said I never want to see you again!" And then they kiss.

 

How about any scene where the guy breaks down the door to get to a woman. I don't know what comes to mind? Hum... How about, uh, Gone With The Wind? Or the "This is one night you're not turning me out." I don't need to go on. Clark Gable, yum.

 

I'll think of more and get back to you.

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In one scene from Heaven Can Wait (1943), an elderly Don Ameche is trying to wheedle his son into hiring a young woman to "read" to him. He pulls a book randomly from his library shelf as an example of the edifying literature that such a woman can bring to him. He goes to read the title of the book to his son. Is it the Iliad or the Odyssey? War and Peace? The Wealth of Nations?

 

No. It's a little tome that his late, loving and understanding wife (Gene Tierney) was attempting to purchase when they first met. It's called "How to Make Your Husband Happy". The moment, in less skilled hands than Ernst Lubitsch, would simply underline the comic inappropriateness of such a book in Ameche's hands, but here it brings back everything about this character's wife in a rush. It's funny, and endearing and, yes, romantic, simultaneously.

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From Now Voyager,

Bette says to Heinreid;

"Don't lets ask for the moon, we have the stars".

Especially poignant coming from the repressed character she started out as in the movie.

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TOOMANY, that is so romantic! I didn't know you had it in ya!! Well, then, so what you are saying is we all have a little Frankenstein monster in us?

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