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LawrenceA

Yul Brynner: Hail to the King

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Nice, kingrat! Was this one of those TCM showings? It's a shame that more weren't in attendance. The film is a big slab of DeMille cheese, but it is effective. Heston, Brynner and Robinson all go broad but it's called for with the tone of the film. Did they give you an intermission?

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Those of us fortunate enough to attend got the whole treatment: intro from Ben M, overture, DeMille's curtain speech introducing the film, intermission with more Elmer Bernstein music, outro from Ben M, and exit music. Except for us TCM followers, the showing was not well publicized, and the theater, at a downscale mall, is part of the AMC chain, specializing in films like Allegiant Detergent and Batman vs. Stuporman. One of the artsier theaters would have been better.

 

We thought there might be numerous church groups in attendance, but that was not the case. Perhaps it was poor publicity, perhaps people have gotten used to seeing it on TV.

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Great that you got to see this on the big screen, Kingrat.

 

I watched the movie for Yul Brynner, primarily.  I would love to see it on the big screen.  It is a shame it was not more well attended.

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Considering all the love being shown for Yul Brynner in this thread, many may be interested in knowing that his The King and I (1956) is the TCM Big Screen Classic/Fathom Event in August.

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I have just finished watching Anastasia (1956) on TCM. Not the first time I've seen this one.

Purists may quibble that evidence amassed over the last 25 years eliminates the mystery of this movie. Purists may quibble that Ingrid Bergman is too old to portray a potential grand duchess of 27 years of age. Purists may quibble that Yul Brynner is too young to portray an exiled Russian general for an empire ten years gone. If so, purists are idiots.

The movie is a fantasy set in the real world and an excellent one at that. We get to watch Ms. Bergman transition from weakness and doubt as to who she is to strength and knowledge as to what she wants. And Mr. Brynner transition from sternness to jealousy as what he wants changes over the course of the movie. It begins as a con game bigger than ever imagined by the great Henry Gondorff being played by Mr. Brynner along with Akim Tamiroff (Who else?!?) and Sacha Pitoeff. Changes into a mystery with multiple amateur detectives including Helen Hayes (in a fine performance) all starting to believe or, at least, wanting to believe that Ms. Bergman is, indeed, the genuine article. And ends as a romance as the two leads disappear together without resolving the mystery (and I'm glad they didn't). Punctuated by one of my favorite last lines in a movie: "I will tell them that the play is over, now go home."

One of my favorite scenes is when Ms. Bergman and Mr. Brynner are unseen and conversing from within their separate bedrooms. Can you imagine having to watch that scene in pan and scan?!? And don't ask me why, but I really love the two scenes with Mr. Brynner playing the guitar.

The final proof that this is a excellent movie? "Mrs. Howell" (Natalie Schafer) can appear in it without being a distraction.

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The only film of his I`ve tried to watch but could not finish was The Sound and the Fury which aired as part of the recent spotlight on Southern writers because it was too depressing and weird for me.  I really tried to finish it for Yul. ------- writes ColumboFan.

 

I like this.

 

==

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The only film of his I`ve tried to watch but could not finish was The Sound and the Fury which aired as part of the recent spotlight on Southern writers because it was too depressing and weird for me.  I really tried to finish it for Yul. ------- writes ColumboFan.

 

I like this.

 

==

Thank-you, Laffite.

 

I imagine it will air on TCM again.  I really want to see everything Brynner did.

 

Hey,I got through watching The Yearling because I love Gregory Peck, but I haven't watched it since he died. 

 

The death of the deer was necessary, but I don't really want to watch it again.

 

So I might try to watch The Sound and the Fury again.  Eventually.

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   Although I'm not a fan of his-(though perfectly cast of course in "King & I") a longtime fellow cinephile

pal o'mine-(for 34yrs now) went to see him do the classic role on stage once!

 

& he was also able to see *Quinn on stage as "Zorba"

 

 

(TRIVIA: *Yul was very well known as an egotist-(hope I spelled it correctly)

& when shooting "The Magnificent 7" he was furious w/Steve McQueen for stealing little bits of sequences they were in together. & Steve would mainly do this without any dialogue too

It only came up on the dailies, such as an early scene when they 2 first meet & are riding up a hill in a wagon prior to a shootout,etc

 

This also occurred to *D. Hoffman w/McQueen in Papillon"  He starved & did all these method things to look awful in the epic & then saw Steve in the dailies & actually thought this guy would win an *Oscar for it, but he wasn't even nommed?

 

THANK YOU

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I recorded the movie from earlier today. Did anyone watch it as it aired?

 

Edit:

 

I'm talking about The Double Man

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Just a reminder to Yul Brynner fans that The Magnificent Seven (1960) airs today on TCM.

 

I'm a genre kid so it should come as no surprise that The Magnificent Seven is my favorite Yul Brynner movie. And not just for Mr Brynner. The cast was ideal (Eli Wallach, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, James Coburn, etc.). The direction by John Sturges was ideal. The script was ideal with many many great lines from start ("You elected?" "Na. I got nominated real good.") to finish ("The old man was right. Only the farmers won. We lost. We always lose."). And a score by Elmer Bernstein that was beyond ideal.

 

I don't know if a perfect movie is possible. But, for me, this one is in that conversation.

 

One of the most amazing things was the concept of Mr. Brynner in a western. Considering his movie career up to that point, who would have expected his three movies of 1960 to be a western and two comedies (Once More, with Feeling! and Surprise Package)? Heck of a change of pace!

 

(TRIVIA: *Yul was very well known as an egotist-(hope I spelled it correctly)

& when shooting "The Magnificent 7" he was furious w/Steve McQueen for stealing little bits of sequences they were in together. & Steve would mainly do this without any dialogue too

It only came up on the dailies, such as an early scene when they 2 first meet & are riding up a hill in a wagon prior to a shootout,etc

 

Horst Buchholz states in Guns For Hire: The Making of The Magnificent Seven documentary that Yul Brynner told Steve McQueen that, if he didn't stop what he was doing, then Mr. Brynner would take his hat off in every scene they had together and no one would notice Mr. McQueen at all.

 

:)

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Just a reminder to Yul Brynner fans that The Magnificent Seven (1960) airs today on TCM.

 

I'm a genre kid so it should come as no surprise that The Magnificent Seven is my favorite Yul Brynner movie. And not just for Mr Brynner. The cast was ideal (Eli Wallach, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, James Coburn, etc.). The direction by John Sturges was ideal. The script was ideal with many many great lines from start ("You elected?" "Na. I got nominated real good.") to finish ("The old man was right. Only the farmers won. We lost. We always lose."). And a score by Elmer Bernstein that was beyond ideal.

 

I don't know if a perfect movie is possible. But, for me, this one is in that conversation.

 

One of the most amazing things was the concept of Mr. Brynner in a western. Considering his movie career up to that point, who would have expected his three movies of 1960 to be a western and two comedies (Once More, with Feeling! and Surprise Package)? Heck of a change of pace!

 

 

Horst Buchholz states in Guns For Hire: The Making of The Magnificent Seven documentary that Yul Brynner told Steve McQueen that, if he didn't stop what he was doing, then Mr. Brynner would take his hat off in every scene they had together and no one would notice Mr. McQueen at all.

 

:)

LOL!

 

I am a major fan of both men, but I have to admit that if Yul had no hat on, I would have loved the movie even more!

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