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bradtexasranger

Katharine Hepburn, love her, love her not

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- - - LOVE HER - - -I don't recall who said it first, but the tears during Tracey's monologue were real, in fact most of the cast and crew were in tears, or so I heard on a talk show or a bio on t.v. Someone said he was looking at her through the whole thing. I imagine Kate appealed to everybody, she was as female as she was tomboyish. Women HAD to love her attitude towards slacks, and men probably wished they were Tracey, or whoever the leading man was.

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In the TNT documentary, "All About ME" and in her autobiography, Ms. Hepburn answers back all of the men who've bashed her for choosing to wear slacks, "Try it," she says, "Try a skirt!" The only person who could persuade her to wear a skirt or dress was Spencer Tracy.

The "Kate the Great" website is great, by the way!

-Susan

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Friday is the great Kate's turn for her fourth annual Summer Under the Stars salute, and it's a pretty good lineup:

 

All About Me (1993) is a good interview that gives you a sense of the actress

Little Women (1933) was only her fourth film; she gives one of the best performances as Jo March in any of these movies based on the Louisa May Alcott book

Quality Street (1937) is a delightful little curio which (like the above features a terrific supporting cast) gives one a feel for the prim and proper days of dating in the 19th century

Stage Door (1937) is one of those terrific (mostly female) ensemble films

Bringing Up Baby (1938) is the definitive screwball comedy

The Philadelphia Story (1940) is another great comedy which features her comeback performance (after having been labeled 'box office poison')

Woman of the Year (1942) was her first of many successful pairings with Spencer Tracy

Adam's Rib (1949) is my favorite of the Tracy-Hepburn films; it also features the delightful Judy Holliday and a particularly annoying David Wayne

The African Queen (1951) - Bogart had to give a strong performance to hold his own with her in this one; an effort which earned him his first and only Oscar

Rooster Cogburn (1975) - her first and only pairing with John Wayne, which was just as well;-)

Long Day's Journey into Night (1962) - anyone who doubts this actress's acting chops has never seen this one, which is pretty downbeat and depressing but features four powerhouse performances (including those by Ralph Richardson, Jason Robards, and Dean Stockwell)

skip the last two, late night movies which seem to have been programmed because they fit into the time available (e.g. they don't follow the chronology, or quality, of the day)

 

FYI, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967), which earned the actress the second of (her record) four Oscars, will be shown August 30th (Sidney Poitier's day), and Suddenly, Last Summer (1960) will air October 26th.

 

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path40a

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I'm here again because I just read the whole 4 pages of this thread. Have any of you naysayers re: H/T affair ever been truly in love?. I know that sounds corny but today, 15 years as a widow, I still get butterflies in my stomach when I look at photos of my late husband. I've never had that feeling before, or since him. And that's what they had, they just couldn't do anything about it. Why do you suppose he was a drunk with a family like that? Devoting your life to your sick child is exemplary but you also have to spare time for your chosen life partner. There was a spark between H/T, that's why it lasted so long. We're not talking months here, but years. Liz and Burton had it, so probably, do Woodward and Newman, Jimmy Stewart and his Gloria, Bob Hope and his wife, and finally Greg Peck and his second wife. Sometimes this 'spark' is only lust, and dies out soon, as shown by some of the young stars of today who marry and divorce like changing socks, something kept the above listed couples together through all the glamour and partying of H'wood. Robert Mitchum's wife gve him an ultimatim once and carried it out, from then on he behaved until Shirley MacLaine came along, but even then wifey only had to threaten and he shaped up again.

 

Sorry for going on, but apparently Kate did the nurturing that Mrs, T. didn't.

 

By the way, speaking of Mitchum, does anyone know the name of the movie with him and Robert Taylor as brothers and Kate as Taylors wife. Much as I like Kate, her portrayal of the 'country bumpkin' didn't quite come off in that one but maybe I'd been too 'Katerized' by the time I saw it. These senior moments really **** me off!!!!!

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Anne:

 

The Taylor/Mitchum/Hepburn movie is "Undercurrent" from 1946. I think the bumpkin picture you refer to is "Spitfire."

 

I've only ever been truly and deeply in love with my wife. 22 years and going strong. It's wonderful you still have those feelings.

 

Unsure why he was a drinker. Never having known one I guess any reason one could use would be good enough. There are and have been enough of them in Hollywood so I'm sure the reasons are varied.

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Thanks, 1957, I'm glad to hear it.

 

But in the beginning of Undercurrent altho her dad was famous, and she married a rich & famous man, she only has a mousy brown dress to wear ro a reception? Then she lets him choose her entire wardrobe for her. That's what I meant with the bumpkin remark.

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For me, I think I'm a fan of Katharine Hepburn, both on and off the screen. But I have to say that I did NOT care for some of her roles.

 

I loved her in every film she made with Spencer Tracy - they were great together and he balanced her out perfectly. She often came off as very hyper in her films, whereas he came off as very calm. Together, they worked very well together and as a result, my favorite Hepburn films are the ones she made with Spencer Tracy.

 

I also love The African Queen. She was kinda hyper in that role too, but not as much as in, say, Bringing Up Baby...a film that I just can't stand.

 

I mean, I like Kate...and I like Cary Grant. Both are very talented actors in general and comic actors in particular. But her character in this film was one of the most annoying I've ever watched. Not her fault - it was really the writers who made that charcter annoying. But nevertheless, I don't care for that movie in the slightest.

 

Love her character in Stage Door. Love to hate her character in Suddenly Last Summer. And there are many other wonderful films she was in. But yeah...there were a few I didn't care for.

 

And I will say this - offscreen, she was an absolute role model for women. She didn't take any crap from anyone, she did as she liked the vast majority of the time, and she didn't care what other people thought when she broke the cookie-cutter mold for women of the day. For that alone, she is wonderful, in my eyes.

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I don't love her and I don't hate her. I like her in a few roles especially in "Summertime", "Suddenly, Last Summer", "The African Queen" and "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner".

I once saw her in person in New York when she was appearing in "West Side Waltz". She came out the stagedoor, head a bit shaky, a smile on her face.

Her elderly driver advised the crowd not to talk to her or take any pictures. She got into an old station wagon with him and off they went down the street.

No limo for the great Kate.

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Love her. Jack Burley, such eloquence should not go unapplauded--Bravo on your great summary.

 

I'm excited about her day on Friday--it's the only day this week where practically the whole day is highlighted. I've seen just about everything she's done pre-1970 and a few after (On Golden Pond (loved it) Love among the Ruins (Loved it) This Can't be Love(undecided about this one)) except Trojan Women and Mad Woman of Chaillot. Has anyone seenthose two? Are they worth picking up on (over-priced) VHS?

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I saw "Madwoman Of Chaillot" years ago. While it boasts a great cast and good director (who replaced John Huston) I don't have much of a memory for it. In fact most of my movie reference books that bother to mention it don't think too highly of it.

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I'm here one last time. I just saw the coming attraction for 'Long Day's Journey Into Night' and that looks like the kind of movie I turn off the phone, get a big drink and curl up in the corner of my couch.

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> I'm here one last time. I just saw the coming

> attraction for 'Long Day's Journey Into Night'

> and that looks like the kind of movie I turn off the

> phone, get a big drink and curl up in the corner of

> my couch.

 

You mean your "last time" for this board.........or this thread? :-) I will take your word on " Long Day's Journey into Night" and try to stay up for it Friday night........even though it's a little past my bedtime :-)

 

Brad

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> I'm here one last time. I just saw the coming

> attraction for 'Long Day's Journey Into Night'

> and that looks like the kind of movie I turn off the

> phone, get a big drink and curl up in the corner of

> my couch.

 

Have you seen Hepburn's "Glass Menagerie?" It's available on DVD - a made for TV film of the 70s. It's different from any other version I've seen - she is a very different, but no less effective and valid, Amanda Wingfield. The other actors, including Sam Waterston, give more intensity to their parts than is usual for this play, in order to match the energy of Hepburn's performance. VERY interesting.

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That's another Hepburn gem, her "Rise and shine!" makes you want to reach through the screen and grab her by the throat.

I cannot wait for "Long Day's Journey" and the rest of the day's playbill. My VCRs throughout the house are primed and ready. Interesting back story, Spencer Tracy was going to play James Tyrone, Sr., but due to failing health, could not. The part was recast with Ralph Richardson and Hepburn honored her commitment to play the laudanum-addicted Mary in O'Neill's "play of old sorrow, written in tears and blood." That would have been something I'd pay to see! Also interesting to note that O'Neill gave the play to his third wife, Carlotta, as a gift, with instructions not to release it to the public until 25 years after his death. Three years after his death, it was on Broadway and, catch this casting, Frederic March, his real life wife actress Florence Eldridge, Jason Robards, Jr. and Bradford Dillman in the lead roles.

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> That's another Hepburn gem, her "Rise and shine!"

> makes you want to reach through the screen and grab

> her by the throat.

 

Yeah, she really was a pain in the ****, as that character certainly can be played. Most actresses play her as so seemingly passive (passive-aggressive, actually), but Hepburn as Amanda was so in-your-face nagging and frustrated to her children, it was no wonder her daughter retreated into cloud-cuckoo-land and her son ultimately joined the Merchant Marine to get away. It's a very unique take on this play, and I think it works.

 

KH is really wonderful in "Long Day's Journey," and so tragic at the end. She gives a much quieter performance in this one than in "Menagerie." What a woman!

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> I'm here one last time. I just saw the coming

> attraction for 'Long Day's Journey Into Night'

> and that looks like the kind of movie I turn off the

> phone, get a big drink and curl up in the corner of

> my couch.

 

Annelindley

It's worth it. Depressing, but very worthwhile watching.

 

I have the "Menagerie" DVD and Hepburn actually plays it like I always pictured the character from English class reading of it

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What a great day this has been. It started early this morning with 'Quality Street' and is still going on. I quit here to watch 'African Queen' again, and after 'Rooster', I'm going to settle down for 'Long Day's. . .' I remember seeing 'Quality Street' when I was about 12, and thought "What a stupid movie"; after today's showing, I say "What a delightful movie"! It was funny, sad, well acted and any more accolades I might think up. What a difference our thought processes can make over the years.

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> What a great day this has been. It started early

> this morning with 'Quality Street' and is

> still going on. I quit here to watch 'African

> Queen' again, and after 'Rooster', I'm

> going to settle down for 'Long Day's. . .' I

> remember seeing 'Quality Street' when I was

> about 12, and thought "What a stupid movie"; after

> today's showing, I say "What a delightful movie"!

> It was funny, sad, well acted and any more

> accolades I might think up. What a difference our

> thought processes can make over the years.

 

So, Anne, did you see "Long Days..........."? I just finished watching it, had to drink several Red Bulls and Mountain Dews to stay up this late ......lol, but it was well worth it. Powerful film, Kate and the whole cast were amazing. I just always seem to love films based on plays anyway. Hope you got to see it too. I've got to get to bed soon...........lol

 

Brad

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For those of you who loved "Long Day's Journey", Ric Burns and PBS did a really good documentary on Eugene O'Neill last winter. You might want to keep an eye out for it being replayed to get the story behind the story.

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lzcutter:

 

Knew I couldn't make it thru last night, so I taped it this morning and just finished watching. Talk about your colossal dysfunctional families. An arrogant **** for a father, and a skinflint on top of it who bellows about his son the drunk, yet never has a scene without a drink in his hand. Two sons who think the world and their family owe them a living, and all topped off by a crazy druggie for a mother. And the dialog! ! ! Listen to the wacko who thinks she has to be forgiven BEFORE she can pray, while her husband walks around expounding as if he was on stage. Notwithstanding the caliber of acting (this things' only redeeming quality), didn't O'Neill ever hear of just one little smidgen of comic relief? Three solid hours of maudlin whining is not my cup of tea. BTW that washer woman he described was my mother and altho she was frugal, at least we got our nickel once in a while for ice cream or candy.

 

Sorry kids, at my age I've seen it all in real life, don't need it in REEL life. I think I'd rather watch '12 Angry Men' again.

 

P.S. From what Robert said, I guess I'm alone in this belief, I can't understand how this got all those accolades. I feel like Anne Bancrofts' angry diatribe about that book of poems in 13 Charring Cross Road (or what ever the number was).

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Heard about that documentary from a friend a while back, but had forgotten about it.

Thanks for the reminder, lz.

 

A great O'Neill play.

 

Would like to see it on stage sometime.

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Love her.

 

An excellent actor.

 

Though, in my estimation, not phenomenal as she is given credit for being (though I never saw her on the stage), but neverthless always a favourite of ours.

 

Really enjoyed Cate Blanchett's impersonation of her in The Aviator.

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