Debra Johnson

Ida Lupino

62 posts in this topic

"Hard, Fast and Beautiful" - Ida Lupino obviously worked fast, with little money and not enough time - so this B-flick is actually an extraordinary achievement - Ida takes us into a young tennis star's success story, but it turns out to be her mother's "success story" instead - and, in the process, the mom loses her husband, her daughter and their handler - the final frame where Claire Trevor sits in an empty tennis stadium amid flying scraps of paper is sad, sad, sad.- while you're watching it, the story flips over and becomes something of a tragedy.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just caught Ida in a rerun of Columbo. She got bumped off by her husband, Johnny Cash. God I miss 70's tv!

She did another Columbo episode later with Roddy McDowall.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, in that other episode she was the killer.

And then she's the victim again in Ellery Queen.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ida Lupino directed a first-rate episode of "Thriller" with Mala Powers, who starred in Lupino's  B-flick, "Outrage".

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it was based on the movie. Morgan Fairchild played Crawford's part in the TV version. It ran for two seasons, and given the format and the era of 80s soaps, I thought it was well made. 

 

You are mistaken.

Morgan Fairchild did not play the part in the TV series Flamingo Road that Joan Crawford played in the 1949 movie version.

Joan Crawford played Lane Bellamy in the movie.

Morgan Fairchild played Constance Weldon in the TV series. In the Joan Crawford movie the character of Constance Weldon was called Anabelle Weldon and the part was played by Virginia Huston.

The Anabelle/Constance character was the girlfriend and later wife of Field Carlisle (the name was spelled Carlyle in the TV series) and was from a well-to-do, politically-connected family. 

The role of Anabelle Weldon was a much smaller role in the movie version compared to Morgan Fairchild's role of Constance Weldon on the TV series.

 

The Lane character (played by Joan Crawford in the movie and by Cristina Raines in the TV series) was a carnival performer who became stranded in the Southern town where Field was the deputy sheriff. In the TV series the town is in the Florida panhandle; in the movie a specific state is not mentioned. Lane and Field have an affair in both versions of Flamingo Road.

In the TV series, Lane's last name is Ballou rather than Bellamy.

 

In The TV series, Constance Weldon (Morgan Fairchild) is revealed to be the biological daughter of Lute Mae Sanders (played by Gladys George in the 1949 movie and by Stella Stevens in the 1980s TV series).

 

The Dan Reynolds character in the movie is called Sam Curtis in the TV series. Lane marries this character in both versions.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't believe that anyone has made reference to the first film in Lupino's career in which her remarkable intensity as an actress first blossomed into an outstanding performance, THE LIGHT THAT FAILED.

 

I suppose that's understandable since few writing on this thread will have seen it, perhaps most not even having heard of it. A 1939 Paramount production, based on a Kipling novel, it is, unfortunately, a difficult, though not impossible, film to locate. To the best of my knowledge, it has never even been released on video tape, let alone DVD. Copy right issues, possibly, or, just sitting in a film vault owned by Universal might be the explanation.

 

Ronald Colman stars as an artist who is slowly going blind. He has been commercially successful with his art but knows that he has never produced one truly great piece of art. Then he meet street girl Lupino. She is surly and suspicious, though ready to be manipulative, as well. She's a street survivor, a hard case who has been kicked around all her young life, and it shows.

 

Colman paints her portrait - provoking her, browbeating her, into laughing hysterically - and it's that hysterical laughter that he captures on his canvas - realizing that he is producing his one masterpiece, as blindness encroaches him more and more.

 

Colman is fine in his role (he has a key scene in this film of great vulnerability which is quite touching), but it's Lupino, in a supporting role, who steals the show. As the film progresses her bitterness becomes so extreme that, in a highly vindictive moment, she does something that I won't reveal here. Yet Lupino makes the viewer understand why she is such a bitter case. And, in the final analysis, you feel sorry for her.

 

Ida%2BLupino%2B%26%2BRonald%2BColman%2Bi

 

Soon after this film's release Warners would put the actress under contract, and she would produce that memorable portrait of possessiveness and intensity in They Drive By Night, another very human portrait by the actress playing an unlikable character for whom the audience will, in the final analysis, feel pity.

 

475547ab-a4ad-41ae-9370-12743e7e08cc_zps

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't believe than anyone has made reference to the first film in Lupino's career in which her remarkable intensity as an actress first blossomed into an outstanding performance, THE LIGHT THAT FAILED.

The Light that Failed is one of my top ten favorite movies. It's a very special movie with a great cast and terrific supporting performances by Ida Lupino, Dudley Digges, Walter Huston, Muriel Angeles, Ferike Boros, Pedro de Cordoba, and Ernest Cossart; and a terrific performance by Ronald Colman in the lead. Also featuring a great score by Victor Young.

 

The film has my favorite opening of any movie, ever -- two kids and a goat running along the beach at Fort Keeling, England, in 1865. In the context of all the space and time that the film covers, that opening is pure magic. A great, under-appreciated film.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Light that Failed is one of my top ten favorite movies. It's a very special movie with a great cast and terrific supporting performances by Ida Lupino, Dudley Digges, Walter Huston, Muriel Angeles, Ferike Boros, Pedro de Cordoba, and Ernest Cossart; and a terrific performance by Ronald Colman in the lead. Also featuring a great score by Victor Young.

 

The film has my favorite opening of any movie, ever -- two kids and a goat running along the beach at Fort Keeling, England, in 1865. In the context of all the space and time that the film covers, that opening is pure magic. A great, under-appreciated film.

 

The first time I saw The Light That Failed was on the big screen at the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto. It was wonderful to see such a rare, fine film blown up on a giant screen before me, far more exciting than seeing it on a mere TV screen.

 

That presentation of the film has always stayed with me.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us