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TCM commercial

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I'm sorry, but Peggy, Fred and Sweetbaby are all out of touch. I really don't know what you guys are basing this on. I've been watching TCM off and on all day this week, and it's been mainly films from 30's to 50's. It's a mystery to me why all of you are panicing. I just don't get it.

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I just don't get it.

 

SHAFT is ....... what?.......... a classic movie??????

 

Peggy24, you're absolutely right. Many of us here have been getting that 'feeling' about TCM for the past year. As others are quick to point out, they didn't turn out the 'classic' lights overnight, as AMC did, but they have been sneaking in crap here and there.

 

Welcome to the board. I'm a coot...56...and a curmudgeon. Fact is, TCM is the only station left in the vast wasteland of cable television (without paying for premium stations) that is worth a tinker's damn.

 

dolores

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I wonder what time of day Brad has been watching? Probably not prime time. I'm sorry, but I really feel that TCM is limiting itself much too much as well. For example "The Third Man" - a classic movie, sure, but do they really need to run it six times in 2 months? Don't get me wrong, I love this channel, but as I said, it's frustrating sometimes. Looking through the threads (really hard to figure out how to get back to them), I see that there was something on about Frank McHugh last year. One of my favorite "second banana" men~ and I missed it, all because I get fed up and don't watch for weeks at a time sometimes~!

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> I wonder what time of day Brad has been watching?

> Probably not prime time.

 

Ok, that does not hold water. "Prime time" this week has featured:

 

Dinner At Eight(1933)

Now, Voyager(1942)

Miss Grant Takes Richmond(1949)

Sabrina(1954)

Suspicion(1941)

Plus the foreign films:

 

Death Of A Cyclist(1955)

Viridiana(1961)

 

And tonight its:

The Defiant Ones(1958)

Not As A Stranger(1955)

 

From the 30's: 1

40's:3

50's:4

60's:1

 

But I realize you people only see what you want to see, so I'll let you go on believing what you want.

 

I'd hate for the facts to get in the way of your arguments.

 

Message was edited by:

bradtexasranger

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Yes, and has been pointed out TCM showed 6,934 b/w movies and 1135 crap movies since midnight of Dec. 30, 2005.

 

No, the above are not facts, I am being sarcastic.

 

The FACT remains that TCM the 'classic' channel should NOT be showing SHAFT.

 

SHAFT is not classic, never was classic, never will be classic, not in 2006, not in 2036, not in the year 2525.

 

dolores

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> The FACT remains that TCM the 'classic' channel

> should NOT be showing SHAFT.

>

> SHAFT is not classic, never was classic, never will

> be classic, not in 2006, not in 2036, not in the year

> 2525.

 

Who are you to appoint yourself judge and jury on what is "classic" and what is "crap"? Have you ever heard that "one man's junk is another man's treasure"? I think Lana Turner's Imitation Of Life and Madame X are crap, but I realize a lot of people enjoy them.

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>

> But I realize you people only see what you want to

> see, so I'll let you go on believing what you want.

>

 

 

You keep doing the same, brad. With all the time you spend on these boards, how do you have time to watch anything?

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With all the time you

> spend on these boards, how do you have time to watch

> anything?

 

Ah, such a mature comment. I'm surprised you're old enough to be on these boards.

 

Not that it's any of your business, but I watch plenty. I usually just stay logged on to the board, whether I'm posting, or even reading, or not.

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Now, everybody, let's not get into another word war. Much as we hate to admit it, TCM IS changing slowly. They are showing later movies, which as I have said, will one day be tomorrows classics, they are just jumping ahead a little, and faster than we would like, but it is inevitable, why?, I don't know. The older fan base prefers the old B&W but TCM feels they must include the younger groups, after all, the younger groups will soon be the older groups. I just looked at next weeks schedule, and although the daytimes are 99% 30's, 40's and 50's. Primetime is quite full of 60's movies. e.g. tonight we get Goke, Body Snatcher from Hell (1968), and Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978). Sunday is 100% typical TCM fare. Monday, being Child Stars month, will be all normal fare as well. Then we get Tuesday, Wed., Thurs.:

 

Annie Hall - 1977 (Primetime)

Moonstruck - 1987 (Primetime)

Out of Towners - 1969 (Primetime)

Shaft - 1971 (Primetime)

Towering Inferno - 1974 (Primetime)

Antonio Gaudi - 1986 (Perhaps 1% of the population cares about architecture)

Our Mother's House - 1967 (Primetime)

Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte - 1964 (Primetime)

 

Friday daytime is all 30's and 40's, however primetime is all horror, all night. I think this is a large part of the problem. Many of us, whether we work or not, may not watch TV that much during the day, but we like to relax at night with a good old movie, but because of the new direction in programming, we no longer have that option. Instead, we have a full evening of one theme, and many of us do not want to sit through 3 or 4 horror, mystery, western, or drama themes. There is a documentary (2004) about Gene Kelly dance, I will watch, or record, because I like dance, I don't necessarily like Kelly, but the Antonio Gaudi, is WHAT??!! for me. Maybe purists will tell me I should find beauty in architecture, well a building is to keep the elements out as far as I'm concerned, I don't care if it has gables, or looks like a brown derby. Yet I love Project Runway, watching them make dresses, so unlike me, many of you will enjoy old Antonio. I understand this is what TCM is doing, trying to appeal to everyone, but why? In this day of specialized cable channels, we can watch our favorite hobbies on other channels. I doubt that a plumber wants to come home and watch a documentary on plumbing. If he does, he can watch HGTV, or PBS. Cooks, likewise, house painters, likewise, historians, likewise, sports enthusiasts, likewise, and so on.

 

However, as I said earlier, there is nothing we can do except use our recorders, and enjoy what we want to, until the station is 50% - 60's, 70's, 80's, and 90's. Which will be the oldies for the next generation.

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"...but the 'Antonio Gaudi', is WHAT??!! for me. Maybe purists will tell me I should find beauty in architecture, well a building is to keep the elements out as far as I'm concerned, I don't care if it has gables, or looks like a brown derby."

 

Ms. Gunn, this month TCM (in tandem with Architectural Digest, and sponsored by American Leather) is featuring a series of films on architecture. That's why the excellent Gaudi documentary was shown, sandwiched between The Fountainhead and Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House. This series will take place every Wednesday night, and has been getting a lot of favorable talk where I live.

 

http://www.tcm.com/2006/architectureinfilm/index.jsp

 

I'm with you, in that I'll be avoiding the horror months; but I don't begrudge TCM for showing them. It's October (Hallowe'en), after all; and I know that Horror has its fans (see the Horror Forum). I'm sure they'd roll their eyes when my heart quickens to see Irene Dunne and Claudette Colbert; so I'm more than willing to give them their turn.

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> I agree, sweetbabykmd -- pot calling kettle

> black.

>

> Ah, well, I feel sorry for him, he doesn't even see

> what he is.

 

Just curious, what do you think I am? All I did was point out that there were no films on TCM last week from the 70's and beyond. I know you and Sweetbaby can't comprehend that you might be wrong about something. You two are the ones I feel sorry for. I also know you two will continue to flood these boards with endless posts about how TCM is cheating you when they show a 70's or 80's film every once in a blue moon. So, carry on, I'll just ignore you two the best I can.

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> "...but the 'Antonio Gaudi', is WHAT??!! for me.

> Maybe purists will tell me I should find beauty in

> architecture, well a building is to keep the elements

> out as far as I'm concerned, I don't care if it has

> gables, or looks like a brown derby."

>

> Ms. Gunn, this month TCM (in tandem with

> Architectural Digest, and sponsored by

> American Leather) is featuring a series of films on

> architecture. That's why the excellent Gaudi

> documentary was shown, sandwiched between The

> Fountainhead and Mr. Blandings Builds His

> Dream House.

 

Actually, I think the real appeal of "Antonio Gaudi" is the fact that the film was directed by Hiroshi Teshigahara, an excellent but generally underrated Japanese director who's been under the process of rediscovery lately. (Perhaps his greatest movie, "Woman in the Dunes," has recently been restored and released on DVD in Britain.) Anyway, "Antonio Gaudi" certainly fits the month-long theme of architecture, and Gaudi himself was an important and influential architect, but the real importance of the movie for cinema-lovers should be the fact that it's a consideration of one artist (Gaudi) by another (Teshigahara).

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Aw, Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte IS a classic! I love that movie. The scene where Olivia de Havilland starts slapping around Bette Davis great. One only wonders what the slapping scene would look like if Joan Crawford remained cast as Miriam Deering.

 

Okay, changing the subject--am I the only one who finds it funny when TCM keeps playing the monthly commercial when the month is practically over? The Muse commercial came on after "Ship of Fools" last night, and I was like, "William Holden, SOTM? No more! Shorts day? That's been gone for half a month! Janus films? Nope."

 

I'm really excited to see what kind of promo they'll do for October with all the horror movies, Zombie, and the Architecture theme. I'm also wondering what kind of song they'll use--if they'll even do a monthly promo at all. Some months they skip it, which makes me sad.

 

Also, am I the only one who listens to current music and thinks, "Oh that would be a great song for TCM to use?" and tries to imagine a montage based on the upcoming themes? No? Okay, just me then!

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Mr. Quiller, you copied much of my post on the architecture theme, however, you ONLY copied the negative part, I went on to say, "so, unlike ME, many of you will enjoy old Antonio". What is the purpose of concentrating on only the negative without admitting I gave contrary opinion to my own thoughts?

 

As for Hiroshi Teshigahara, and Antonio, I haven't the vaguest idea who either one of them are. Although you may disagree, I do not have an interest in delving into broader information regarding foreign directors, therefore who narrates, or disects the documentary is unimportant, and of no interest to me. I have studied Disney, Hitchcock, Scocese, Spielberg, and others who interest me, but foreign directors are not on my list of examination.

 

As for the architectural movies being shown, TCM proved my point by showing The Fountainhead, Mr. Blandings, and Strangers When we Meet all on the same night, Oct. 4, leaving nothing else for the remainder of the month.

 

Oct. 11 - Skyscraper Souls - The other three movies have nothing to do with architecture, except to see the New York street scenes in The Clock, Naked City, 42nd Street, and Weekend at the Waldorf. IN fact the last two are filmed 90% inside.

Oct. 18 - Except for Mildred Pierce building more restaurants, and redecorating her house, what does it have to do with architecture?

Oct. 25 - Texan and Roman architecture?

 

I've wracked my brain trying to think of architectural movies, but all I can come up with is the modernization of the town in Cimmarron from the mid-1800's to mid-1900's.

 

Unfortunately, architects are not normally thought of in heroic terms. I apologize to any architects reading this.

 

Message was edited by:

heidigunn

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Since this is the last day of September, I thought that I should add my two cents to the discussion before it's history.

 

My cable company finally added TCM to their lineup eleven days ago. The commercial was one of the first things that I saw when I tuned in on September 20th. My initial reaction was "what the heck?" But after viewing it a few times I don't see it as the "gloom and doom" that some of you speak about. What I do see is a woman who is not very happy with her life and wants to escape. How does she accomplish this? Through classic films which are always a constant. The lyrics to the song playing in the background seem to convey this i.e. "we can't bury it...can't cover it." She's the fish out of water, not the films. TCM should thank their PR people for the 317 posts that this promo garnished over the last month.

 

Although I have not been privy to TCM since it's inception, as most of you have, I am still delighted to be able to view it. There have only been three nights out of the last eleven that I haven't devoted to TCM. In fact, to me at least, the programming through November looks to be first rate. For the first time in years I am at peace while watching television. I have faith that this "classic" channel will continue to prevail.

 

MovieGal53

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What I do

> see is a woman who is not very happy with her life

> and wants to escape. How does she accomplish this?

> Through classic films which are always a constant.

> The lyrics to the song playing in the background

> seem to convey this i.e. "we can't bury it...can't

> cover it." She's the fish out of water, not the

> films.

 

What a great interpretation! Welcome to the board. I can tell you're going to be one of the more interesting posters. Looking forward to seeing more :-)

 

 

Brad

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"I've wracked my brain trying to think of architectural movies, but all I can come up with is the modernization of the town in Cimmarron from the mid-1800's to mid-1900's."

 

The following quote is from an article in the San Francisco Chronicle that was published in late August:

 

"This summer, Keanu Reeves, Adam Sandler and Luke Wilson joined the firm of Newman Finney Harrelson Holden Douglas Cooper Gere & Karloff. They're not architects, but they've all played one.

 

Dating back to the silents, when screenwriters seek a profession to connote an artistic bent and a degree of elan, they often as not turn to architecture. Unlike a painter or poet -- to which the adjective 'starving' is, for good reason, attached -- architects are assumed to have an earning capacity that would allow them to live large on the screen. The perception of architects as cool is evident in There's Something About Mary, when Matt Dillon pretends to be one in an attempt to impress Cameron Diaz.

 

'With architects, you have an image of someone above reproach and not damaged, the way lawyers and judges and even doctors have been,' says film historian Robert Osborne, the genial host of Turner Classic Movies.

 

'There are very, very few professions that still have a ring of heroism about them, and architecture is one of the few that does. If an architect is portrayed going off the deep end, it's always because they are so committed to what they're doing and that's an honorable thing. And it's one of the last manly professions -- you are building something outdoors.'"

 

 

Here are some other architecture movies:

 

The Belly of the Architect

Die Hard

The Serpent's Kiss

The Ten Commandments (those pyramids builders!)

Life as a House

My Architect

Lillies of the Field

Friends with Money

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May I add my welcome MovieGal53? Enjoy. I am one of the doom sayers, but as in everything else, I'm learning to accept the changes. It's the 'music' of the promo that I object to, I don't feel it belongs on TCM. I don't feel the least bit sorry for the chick, if she put some clothes on and washed some of that gunk off her face, people might be more willing to help her find herself.

 

Jack: When I said 'heroic' I meant the Bruce Willis/Stallone type of character. I didn't like what I saw in the Something about Mary clips, so I've never seen it, plus the fact that Diaz is NOT one of my favorite people. Out of your list of eight movies, I've only seen three, Die Hard, 10 Commandments, and Lillies. . . , but it made me think of another one! Midnight Lace, Doris Day, crawling around on those girders, or whatever you call them.

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> Mr. Quiller, you copied much of my post on the

> architecture theme, however, you ONLY copied

> the negative part, I went on to say, "so, unlike

> ME, many of you will enjoy old Antonio". What is

> the purpose of concentrating on only the negative

> without admitting I gave contrary opinion to my own

> thoughts?

>

> As for Hiroshi Teshigahara, and Antonio, I haven't

> the vaguest idea who either one of them are.

> Although you may disagree, I do not have an interest

> in delving into broader information regarding

> foreign directors, therefore who narrates, or

> disects the documentary is unimportant, and of no

> interest to me. I have studied Disney, Hitchcock,

> Scocese, Spielberg, and others who interest me, but

> foreign directors are not on my list of examination.

 

Heidi,

 

Technically, I was quoting Jack Burley's response to you, so I only included that portion of your original post that he included in his. Your beef is with him, then, not me.

 

As for foreign directors not being not on your "list of examination" (whatever that means), I can only say, "Your loss." I honestly can't fathom why so many people on this forum are so close-minded to the work of directors whose only misfortune was to be born and work in another country. Seems like you're unnecessarily closing off a vast quantity of beautiful movie-watching experiences from your life. I realize, however, that I'm fighting an uphill battle there. My primary point was really to offer a different reason for watching "Antonio Gaudi" beyond the ones that you and Jack had cited. Other readers of this forum might want to be alerted to the fact that Teshigahara is gradually becoming regarded as one of the great masters.

 

As for whether or not the architecture theme works for all films being shown in October: Well, I guess we'll have to wait for what Robert Osborne draws to our attention during his Intros. Perhaps there are various ways of enjoying the architectural elements in each movie regardless of content. (Obviously, architecture can matter a lot to a film's mise en scene, and some directors -- Fritz Lang, to name one -- studied architecture before going into movies.)

 

Oh, and at least one other non-obvious architecture movie would be "Land of the Pharoahs" -- another pyramid-building extravaganza!

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Jack,

I would hope that all who responded to one of the recent threads here about our favorite movie abodes will enjoy the Archtecture in Film series coming in October.

 

I think there's something to be learned from watching movies from a different perspective.

 

And good archtecture should always be celebrated and appreciated.

 

Art Deco, Mid Century, Victorian, California Bungalows, Haciendas, Country Homes, the Ranch House, Modern Skyscrapers, Cape Cod, Train Stations like Union Station, Grand Central and the one in DC, Queen Anne, European styles, just to name a few.

 

Where would the characters in movies live, work, play and love were it not for architecture?

 

Where would we live?

 

Movies have captured many places that are part of our collective memory such as Penn Station, the Ambassador Hotel, Googie Motels, Bungalow courts and auto courts.

 

One of the reasons we watch the movies is for the art and production design of the sets.

 

And, it seems to me, all of that is influenced by architecture.

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