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Palmerin

PLEASE DON'T EAT THE DAISIES

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One of the points of this movie is how professional critics must provide serious reliable criticisms, and how they should not allow themselves to be seduced by the easy cheap wisecrack that leads to the downalator.

I can think of a whole bunch of movie critics who are neither serious nor reliable. Rex Reed, on a comment about a family movie of the early 1970s that I now cannot remember--RUN WILD, RUN FREE?--, affirmed that he had never met a child who had liked Fleischer's DOCTOR DOLITTLE. Considering what a pompous self-important jackass RR is, I do not believe for one moment that he ever engages in conversations with any children, let alone conversations about deep subjects such as the quality of a film.

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This highly enjoyable movie was based on Jean Kerr's breezy trip through a variety of subjects, like a take-off on Francoise Sagan's "Bonjour, Tristesse".

 

Jean Kerr was married to theater critic, Walter Kerr, and attended many an opening night with him.

 

I'm assuming that the movie might've been inspired by interviews with Jean and Walter.

 

The movie is not based on the book.

 

Thank God, Charles Walters was at the helm.

 

This man turned everything he managed to touch - into gold.

 

I would love to know what the Kerrs thought of the performances of Doris Day and David Niven - and the kids, including the recently-deceased Charles Herbert.

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This highly enjoyable movie was based on Jean Kerr's breezy trip through a variety of subjects, like a take-off on Francoise Sagan's "Bonjour, Tristesse".

 

Jean Kerr was married to theater critic, Walter Kerr, and attended many an opening night with him.

 

I'm assuming that the movie might've been inspired by interviews with Jean and Walter.

 

The movie is not based on the book.

 

Thank God, Charles Walters was at the helm.

 

This man turned everything he managed to touch - into gold.

 

I would love to know what the Kerrs thought of the performances of Doris Day and David Niven - and the kids, including the recently-deceased Charles Herbert.

I have often wondered what real life people who have been portrayed on screen think of the performances and movies.

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This highly enjoyable movie was based on Jean Kerr's breezy trip through a variety of subjects, like a take-off on Francoise Sagan's "Bonjour, Tristesse".

 

Jean Kerr was married to theater critic, Walter Kerr, and attended many an opening night with him.

 

I'm assuming that the movie might've been inspired by interviews with Jean and Walter.

 

The movie is not based on the book.

 

Thank God, Charles Walters was at the helm.

 

This man turned everything he managed to touch - into gold.

 

I would love to know what the Kerrs thought of the performances of Doris Day and David Niven - and the kids, including the recently-deceased Charles Herbert.

I agree with you. PLEASE DON`T EAT THE DAISIES 1960 is a very enjoyable film. Doris always worked well with children, and it shows in this film. Her pairing with David Niven, excellent costars, and Doris`s wardrobe pleased me plenty.

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It's true that this is a really enjoyable movie.  Everyone is believable and the cast is great.  And it must have been fun for Doris and Janis Paige to be together again after their years at Warner Bros. 

 

And I also agree with the assessment of Rex Reed.  What an unlikeable person!  I remember seeing him on Celebrity Jeopardy years ago and he really did not do well at playing the game.  Of course, he tried to justify his extrremely low score by assuring the audience that this was not a true indication of his intelligence.  Not only did the words offend the audience, but his delivery was the height of pomposity.  Oh well.  He just doesn't appear to be a very happy person.

 

Terrence.

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I loved the kids in this movie, especially little Charles Herbert, who appeared so memorably in "The Fly" and "Houseboat".

 

Little Charles Herbert, who died recently, was his family's main source of income.

 

Charles Herbert in a memorable moment from "The Fly" -

 

Fly-web-color.jpg

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One of the points of this movie is how professional critics must provide serious reliable criticisms, and how they should not allow themselves to be seduced by the easy cheap wisecrack that leads to the downalator.

I can think of a whole bunch of movie critics who are neither serious nor reliable. Rex Reed, on a comment about a family movie of the early 1970s that I now cannot remember--RUN WILD, RUN FREE?--, affirmed that he had never met a child who had liked Fleischer's DOCTOR DOLITTLE. Considering what a pompous self-important jackass RR is, I do not believe for one moment that he ever engages in conversations with any children, let alone conversations about deep subjects such as the quality of a film.

Well, you said a mouthful, Palmerin and it was a very edifying mouthful.

 

This is why one probably should avoid all critics, since most of them are self-serving and not that articulate anyway.

 

Plus they often have incredibly bad taste and are nescient. I'm talking mostly about what passes for movie criticism in this day and age. For evidence, let me just mention the screenplay of "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls".

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I would love to see the number that Janis had that was cut in the film. I only recently learned that the part was pitched to Betty Grable, but she turned it down. I love Janis in the film (everybody, really). She steals every scene she's in.......a shame about Herbert. I hadnt known he'd died. :(

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Yes. One of Doris' sons does, but I'm not sure they show him doing it.........It is mentioned in one scene.

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Does anyone actually eat daises in this movie?

Just curious.

OMG!!!!!!

I was so getting ready to post the exact same question!!!!!!!

( it's like we share a mind sometimes.)

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OMG!!!!!!

I was so getting ready to post the exact same question!!!!!!!

( it's like we share a mind sometimes.)

Well, I always thought the film was titled this simply because Doris sings this song and a lot of her films where she sings have song titles in them.

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Well, it's not like it causes a crisis or anything, Doris and Patsy Kelly just shrug it off..........

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I would love to see the number that Janis had that was cut in the film. I only recently learned that the part was pitched to Betty Grable, but she turned it down. I love Janis in the film (everybody, really). She steals every scene she's in.......a shame about Herbert. I hadnt known he'd died. :(

Janis Rule or Joplin?

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Janis Rule or Joplin?

 

 

PAIGE! Pay attention. LOL.

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Yeah, in 1960. LOL.

 

surely you know I was kinda' sorta messin' with you in asking the question.

Although a duet by Janis and Doris of "SECRET LOVE" would no doubt be something EPIC.

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LOL.  I know. It was a slow day on the boards.........

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LOL.  I know. It was a slow day on the boards.........

 

"AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAND MY SEEEEEEEEECRET LOVE'S NO SEEEEEEEEEEEEECREEEEEEEEEEET AAAAAAAAAAAAAAANNNNNNNNNNNNYYYYYYYYYYYYYYMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOORE!!!!!!!!!!"

 

72151267.jpg

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