jdb1

Do You Know Me?

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Are you Zachary Scott?

 

First wife, Elaine Anderson subsequently married John Steinbeck.

 

Don't know details about his sister, but Scott's family was also in cattle ranching in Texas.

 

The line comes from "Mildred Pierce."

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Do you know me?

 

I loved to sing, and had extensive theater and radio experience. I attended Juilliard School of Music, and worked as a choral director for the WPA Arts Project.

 

I appeared in some very popular musical shows, beginning in the 1930s, several of which were written by some very well-known teams, and one of which was written by a celebrated American author.

 

I played two of my most famous roles on stage and in film. For both of these roles, I had to play more than just a character - I had to change myself entirely. Many people mistakenly believed that I was what I was pretending to be, and I loved playing those parts, but I was proud to be as I really am.

 

I won a Tony for one of my stage to screen roles. It was a first for me, and first for the Tonys as well.

 

Who am I?

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Do you know me?

 

I loved to sing, and had extensive theater and radio experience. I attended Juilliard School of Music, and worked as a choral director for the WPA Arts Project.

I won a Tony for one of my stage to screen roles. It was a first for me, and first for the Tonys as well.

 

Juanita Hall? Directed the Hall Johnson singers during the Great Depression, Bloody Mary in "South Pacific," Broadway and movie (but singing dubbed in movie).

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Correct!

 

Hall was the first African-American to win a Tony, for Bloody Mary in "South Pacific." Hammerstein loved her, and wanted her for the film, but Rodgers didn't like her voice, and insisted that her singing be dubbed by the actress who played Bloody Mary in the London production.

 

You're up.

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No response, so I'll give you one to fill the time.

 

Do you know me?

 

My New England family traced its line back to John Quincy Adams. I wanted to be an opera singer, but my voice did not. I went on the stage, and even as a teen I was cast in character parts.

 

My stage experience was extensive. I appeared in the original production of the seminal American musical, and it wasn't in Oklahoma.

 

I was paired with another notable character actor in a successful series of films. We were seemingly made for each other. I was the smart one.

 

I was so notable myself, that I was often portrayed in cartoons. My lifetime was unfortunately too short to give me the chance to age into the roles I was already playing.

 

Who am I?

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I'm going to take a shot and say: Thelma Todd.

 

She is from New England, she was frequently paired with "another notable character actor in a successful series of films" -- that would be ZaSu Pitts, I think -- and she died at a young age.

 

I can't make the connection to J.Q. Adams, but the rest seems to fit.

 

Do I win a cigar?

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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My New England family traced its line back to John Quincy Adams. I wanted to be an opera singer, but my voice did not. I went on the stage, and even as a teen I was cast in character parts.

 

My stage experience was extensive. I appeared in the original production of the seminal American musical, and it wasn't in Oklahoma.

 

Edna Mae Oliver. Played "Parthy" in Show Boat; "Cimarron" reference (Oklahoma); died at 60, I think, still younger than parts she had been playing, etc., etc. Much info in the "What a Character" promo run lately on TCM.

 

I'll leave forming the next quiz to someone else. I'm better at answering, I think, so far....

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Sorry, Dan, no cigar, the answer is indeed the divine Edna Mae.

 

Since Bill doesn't want to give us a puzzler, would you like to do one, Dan?

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Okay, Brooklyn, I'll give it a shot.

 

Instead of a "do you know me?" this one is a "do you know us?" question.

 

Do you know us? We hold the distinction of being the ONLY TWO actors -- one male, one female -- to win a Supporting Oscar for playing the title roles of those two films.

 

Who are we?

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

 

Message was edited by:

daneldorado

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>

> Do you know us? We hold the distinction of being the

> ONLY TWO actors -- one male, one female -- to win a

> Supporting Oscar for playing the title roles of those

> two films.

>

> Who are we?

 

Dan, as usual, your questions are tough. I'm not sure about this - I don't see any supporting actors/actresses who played actual title roles, like Spencer Tracy as "Edison the Man," or Raymond Massey as "Abe Lincoln in Illinois."

 

How about Walter Brennan in "The Westerner" (does that title even refer to him)?

Or George Burns as one of "The Sunshine Boys?"

 

As for actresses -- Meryl Streep as one of the Kramers in "Kramer vs. Kramer?"

Or Diane Wiest as one of the sisters in "Hannah and Her Sisters?"

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jdb1 wrote:

 

"How about George Burns as one of 'The Sunshine Boys?'

 

As for actresses -- Meryl Streep as one of the Kramers in 'Kramer vs. Kramer?'

Or Diane Wiest as one of the sisters in 'Hannah and Her Sisters?'"

 

 

Brooklyn, as usual, you are as sharp as a tack. I'll give you credit for getting the answer right, although none of your excellent choices are the ones I was thinking of.

 

 

Here are the two I had in mind:

 

Vanessa Redgrave won Best Supporting Actress, for "Julia" (1977). Redgrave played the title character, but was not the star.

 

Robert DeNiro won Best Supporting Actor, for "The Godfather Part II" (1974). DeNiro played the young Vito Corleone in the film, but was not the star.

 

 

As I say, Brooklyn: Good work. I guess Bill McC. didn't play this round, so... the ball's in your court.

 

Dan N.

 

http://dan-navarros-blog.blogspot.com/

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I have to admit I've never seen 'Julia.' Not a fan of Redgrave or Fonda.

 

But tell me, did you indeed go to law school? That was a very lawyerly kind of question you posed.

 

I'll revert to you shortly, as they say in legal correspondence.

JDB

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jdb1 wrote:

 

 

"But tell me, did you indeed go to law school? That was a very lawyerly kind of question you posed."

 

 

Sorry, but that one's just too good to resist. I'm not a lawyer, but I played one on TV.

 

It's true. I had a supporting role in a Perry Mason Mysteries show, back in about 1995, after Raymond Burr had died and Hal Holbrook was playing the role. I played an assistant D.A., and, naturally in a Perry Mason show, I was on the losing side.

 

Cheers,

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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OK, Mr. District Attorney, here's one for you:

 

Do you know me?

 

I had an idea I'd become a lawyer, but I found I liked making movies better.

 

I had a long career, and made my first success (though it wasn't my first film), playing a Native American. I was more of a character actor than a leading man, although I got star billing. I played all types - light comedy and heavy drama, but it wasn't until very late in my career that I played someone true to my own heritage.

 

I was in a movie that was so popular, I became a slang word in the 1940s.

 

Who am I?

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I'm going to guess Ricardo Montalban. He is Mexican, but I recall him playing Native Americans in several Westerns (I think he was Cochise in one, but I don't remember which one).

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Anthony Quinn? I know this Mexican-Irish man plays a Native American in The Plainsman (1936), a Mexican at last in A Walk in the Clouds (1995), and many an Italian/Spaniard/Asian man in between.

 

I'm a little stuck as to whether he ever became a 1940s catchphrase, though...

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It's no and no.

 

I go back a little further than either of those two gentlemen, and although I never really left off acting, I had something of a comeback in the 1980s.

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You guys are way too good.

 

At 2:30 this pm, Brooklyn posted a question, meanwhile I took my wife out to dinner, then we returned home to watch "Dancing With the Stars" on ABC, then I sat down to the computer to see if there were any responses to his question.

 

Yipes! There were at least THREE responses... and the last one, by ken123, is, I believe, the correct answer: Don Ameche.

 

BTW: In case most of you are too young to know what Brooklyn meant when he said "I was in a movie that was so popular, I became a slang word in the 1940s"... he's talking about "The Story of Alexander Graham Bell" (1939), and the slang word was "the Ameche." That's what young people called the telephone, in the 1940s... because it was invented by Don Ameche's character, Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone.

 

What do they call the phone today... the cellies?

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

 

Message was edited by:

daneldorado

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Ken is right!

 

And Dan is right!

 

And Aftermath is right!

 

The Ameche it is. Of course in NYC the Ameches are forever associated with Ragu spaghetti sauce, since Don's announcer brother Jim Ameche did radio commercials for Ragu, pointing out the Ameche family's Sicilian heritage ("In my family, we pronounced it 'Ra-hoo' [meaning stew]"), and the supposed virtues of Ragu sauce (ugh). Maybe I don't like it 'cause I'm Neapolitan. Anyway, everybody in Brooklyn knows that red stuff is 'gravy,' not 'sauce.'

 

Got one for us, Ken?

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>

> BTW: In case most of you are too young to know what

> Brooklyn meant when he said "I was in a movie that

> was so popular, I became a slang word in the

> 1940s"... he's talking about "The Story of Alexander

> Graham Bell" (1939), and the slang word was "the

> Ameche." That's what young people called the

> telephone, in the 1940s... because it was invented by

> Don Ameche's character, Alexander Graham Bell, the

> inventor of the telephone.

>

By the way, Dan, I'm the one everyone in my youth said looked like Ina Balin, so it's very likely I'm a she, not a he. Since we in Brooklyn are all so rough and tough, I can understand your misapprehension.

Regards, Judith

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