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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/27/2021 in all areas

  1. Took two people down from Sedona here today for the two hour shuttle van drive to catch their flights out of Phoenix's Sky Harbor. After I dropped them off, I called the office and at which time they advised me that my one lone scheduled inbound passenger's flight had been delayed by a couple of hour, and so they said to just come on back empty. Started to do just that, but then decided to stop into the local Costco near the airport and grab a couple of things I've been needing. After I walked into the place and as I was passing through an aisle containing menswear, suddenly the so
    15 points
  2. I can still well recall a summer job I had as a youth working in a factory. The job was a simple one and it was for a full eight hours every day, shovelling dirt and minerals into a kiln. Simple as the job was it was also an exceedingly dirty one. The minerals, with the rotation of that kiln, hung literally like a dark cloud over our heads as we shovelled this mess into it. Everything would be covered with dirt and grime. Blowing one's nose produced a black product such as I would, thankfully, never see again after I quit the job. At the completion of the day's work, of course, there was alwa
    14 points
  3. THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH Original version, 1934 First I want to say that I really like the more famous version of this story, the 1956 remake starring James Stewart and Doris Day. Who wouldn't? But this write-up is about the original Man Who Knew Too Much, made 22 years earlier. Of course both versions are made by the same director, Alfred Hitchcock, and it's interesting to ponder why he decided to make the film again. I'm not sure he ever did this with any other movie he made. The 1934 version is undeservedly much less famous than its 1956 successor. But it deserves to
    12 points
  4. Speaking for myself I have always found Bringing Up Baby to be one of the most exciting of all film noirs. Let's face it, this film's got it all. Gun molls People Being Followed Reckless Driving Suspicious Characters Sex Appeal People Wearing Disguises Cat Burglars Attack Dogs And, of course, Bodies Being Destroyed
    12 points
  5. Just a really quick note about Cause for Alarm: It's well-known, and was even in 1950, that the more guilty you act, the more guilty people are going to think you are. If you're innocent, relax. Running around acting guilty will only make you seem guilty. Loretta should have said to the execrable Barry S., : "Yeah, so the letter was mailed. Nothing you say is true, and I say, I'm not worried. And if you die- and it won't be by my hand- they can do an autopsy which will show there's no overdose of your medicine in your system. So nyah !" Also, the worst thing she could have
    11 points
  6. Roger Livesey. Maybe because he was a Welsh born actor and best known in England, we in the states may not know him from a lot of productions. I think he was outstanding in I Know Where I'm Going and The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp.
    11 points
  7. Here's a couple of movies with completely different storylines for ya, slayton ol' boy. In 1941, you had The Devil and Miss Jones starring Jean Arthur. And in 1973, you have The Devil in... (...oops, oh wait...not quite the same title here, huh...sorry, never mind)
    11 points
  8. Whenever Audrey Hepburn is paired with a guy old enough to be her father. With Bogart in SABRINA (she has more chemistry with William Holden). With Gary Cooper in LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON (a major mismatch). With Rex Harrison in MY FAIR LADY (another unconvincing pairing).
    11 points
  9. Happy 90th birthday today to none other than Gigi herself, Leslie Caron.
    11 points
  10. Why is Eddie perpetuating the "Loretta Young was raped by Clark Gable" story? She and Gable fell in lust during CALL OF THE WILD. The result of that mutual attraction was Judy Lewis, born overseas and then "adopted" by Loretta, who later told her daughter "you are my mortal sin". Lovely parenting. I've always admired Young on-screen -- to me she was an underrated, naturalistic actress but as a human being not my cup of tea. By all accounts and from everything I've read, a pretty unpleasant person. Narcissistic, cruel, and hypocritical.
    9 points
  11. Sweet Jesus, just how desperate is TCM?? Star signs?? Come on now!!! And I say this as a long-standing amateur astrologer myself. I am embarrassed!!
    9 points
  12. I'd planned a long ramble, sort of a defining statement of purpose and how it's altered in my 13 years on these boards. I also intended a sort of commentary/lecture on behavior of these boards and the state of social media in general and finally a discussion on movies and how my tastes have changed during this time. All that seems like a lot of work right now. So, thanks to all the people who have been on this long, crazy ride with me. Moderators, please don't move this thread! I live my online life on the General Discussions board and wouldn't want to have to go somewhere else. To keep this t
    9 points
  13. I love Shadow of a Doubt, it's one of my favourite Hitchcock films. I've seen it many times, and each time I get something out of it. For one thing, all the players are perfect in their roles. Nobody could have played Charlie, the innocent but very smart young girl who's the lead character, as well as Teresa Wright does. She really nails the dawning realization that her beloved uncle is not at all what she'd always adoringly thought he was -- it's a key moment in the film when she reads the article in the paper and discovers the truth about him. Wright really captures all the compl
    9 points
  14. On Svengoolie tomorrow, July 24, 2021: In terms of plot, performances, design, and sheer creepiness, Edgar Ulmer's 1934 pre-code masterpiece The Black Cat is one of the great films. " Did you hear that, Vitus? The phone is dead. Even the phone is dead." The Lugosi/Karloff chess game likely inspired Ingmar Bergman's similar scene in The Seventh Seal. Karloff's character, architect Hjalmar Poelzig, is named for Hans Poelzig, a German architect, but is said to be based partly on Aleister Crowley. There's even a little humour, particula
    8 points
  15. Far From the Madding Crowd --Bathsheba The Girl in the Red Velvet Swing--Evelyn Nesbit Gone With the Wind --Scarlett Laura
    8 points
  16. Warner Archive has released "The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex" on blu-ray with a transfer that is dazzling. Not only are Bette Davis and Olivia de Havilland great in their cat-and-mouse games, but the detail in their costumes shines as never before--with proper 3-strip registration. But Flynn is a revelation, a perfect movie star, who also hits subtle and varied notes as an actor. I believe this title is underrated --as is his acting in general.
    8 points
  17. SMILES OF A SUMMER NIGHT , dir. Ingmar Bergman, 1955 Seemed like a good time of year to watch this one, given it's the middle of July. I'd seen it a few times before, I think this was my 3rd or 4th viewing. But it takes several viewings to get it, at least it did for me. The first time I saw Smiles of a Summer Night I wasn't sure what I thought of it, and I certainly didn't recognize it as a comedy, which is what it's billed as. I did kind of like it though. I liked the lush Swedish scenery, the lovely countryside where the second half of the film takes place. I enjo
    8 points
  18. Next weeks Noir Alley is Los Tallos Amargos. I recommend one doesn't let subtitles cause them to miss this film.
    8 points
  19. Taylor is usually or primarily good when he plays a character who's rigid, unbending, emotionless and often calculating, and which played well into what many people consider his oft "wooden" performances. THAT was always his forte and was where and when he was well cast, but hardly ever in a romatic lead unless it was a period piece in which he's sporting a toga, well okay, actually a Roman centurian's garb (read: Quo Vadis) or tights (read: Ivanhoe), and/or as Tom mentioned above, his turn as the cold blooded bad man in the western The Last Hunt. Another film in which he plays this type
    8 points
  20. I'm waiting for the month they do star zip codes. Or have cafeteria workers across the country choose their favorite Cary Grant movies.
    8 points
  21. Time stops for no one but definitely slowed down for wonderful talent Leslie Caron-Wow-guess dancing kept her fit & healthy to reach 90! Have a glass of wine for us Leslie! Congratulations!
    8 points
  22. The Lodger (1927) TCM 7/10 A man renting a room is suspected of being the killer of several women in London. This was my first viewing of this early Hitchcock silent film. Despite it being on so late last night, I was engrossed enough to watch it all the way through. It had many of the Hitchcock touches even though this was his first thriller. It was the first time we see the obsession with blondes as all the victims are fair haired women. Ivor Novello has a striking looking face and was very good in the title role. An interesting thing has a triangle forming between the Lodger, the
    8 points
  23. How about James Mason? Certainly an actor of some reputation, but I think generally underrated. He was fearless in his choice of roles, frequently playing characters who weren't highly sympathetic.
    7 points
  24. It's interesting that Marlo Thomas for TCM did a tribute promo for Loretta and it's been shown on TCM over the years. Loretta was her Godmother and she talks about how wonderful Loretta was. We've all heard how Loretta was far from wonderful. Co-stars called her "Attila the Nun". Telling Judy Lewis she was her "moartal sin" was about the cruelist thing a mother could say to her child. On the flip side, I've also always admired Loretta as an actress. A great beauty, one of the most beautiful ever on the screen and a wonderful actress. Most times, when one of her films is shown, I watch an
    7 points
  25. Livesey is great. Another one is Anton Walbrook, who was also in COLONEL BLIMP. He does extraordinary work in GASLIGHT (1940) and THE RED SHOES (1948).
    7 points
  26. Never used them. One system was called Multiphone and based out of Seattle. It was most popular on the west coast. There may have been similar systems elsewhere. They were essentially dealt a death blow by the introduction of the 45 rpm record and the march of technology. Multiphone's advantage over the more common jukebox in the era of 78 rpm records was the size of its available library of songs. Multiphone users could select from 170 or so titles. Until the 45 came about, juke boxes were really limited in the number of records they could store. https://www.king5.com/article
    7 points
  27. El Dorado (1966) I recall back in 1967 debating as to which John Wayne western I would go to the show to see, El Dorado or The War Wagon. I went to the latter because it co-starred Kirk Douglas. Last evening I watched El Dorado again, Wayne's second last film to be directed by Howard Hawks. In many respects it is a partial re-hash of Rio Bravo, and it plays, in its familiar ways, like old comfort food, I'm sure, for Wayne fans. This time the Duke is a gunslinger who decides to help sheriff-turned-drunk Robert Mitchum when he learns some hired guns will be headed to Mitchum's town aft
    7 points
  28. 7 points
  29. Well this certainly is perfect timing....I just watched THE DIVORCE OF LADY X '38, a 3 strip Technicolor screwball comedy starring Laurence Olivier & Merle Oberon. I had seen this as a teen spurring a lifelong love of Merle Oberon who I thought was the most adorable actress ever. I had zero recollection of the male lead & was pleasantly surprised to see it was Olivier in the opening credits. It's the story of a madcap girl who is forced to stay overnight in town because of impassible fog. She's not the only one scrambling for a room, Olivier's charactor snags the last o
    7 points
  30. I'm a big Anglophile myself- my British wife is my biggest trophy 😄
    7 points
  31. Cleopatra (1934) Cleopatra (1963) The Blue Angel (1930)
    7 points
  32. Flynn had greater versatility as an actor known for action films than any other performer in history. Name any other actor who mastered swashbucklers, westerns and war dramas like Flynn did. Yes, Flynn was always underrated as a performer.
    7 points
  33. Tall Story was released in April 1960, and at that particular moment, Perkins was still regarded as a sympathetic, gentle, boy next door type in films. Psycho was released two months later. Everything changed.
    7 points
  34. HEAVEN CAN WAIT 1943 Fantasy starring Gene Tierney & Don Ameche where a womanizing man dies and tells in flashback scenes why he belongs in h ell for all his past deeds. 1978 Fantasy remake of Here Comes Mr Jordan starring Warren Beatty where he's wrongfully deceased & needs to find a body to live his natural life through.
    7 points
  35. Sorry, Thompson, I can't really agree with this statement. Cliche or not, some of my favourite moments in the movies are when an actress is playing a singer with attitude and walks around a smokey bar or night club singing a song and looking seductive. And the movies have had their fair share of them going right back to Dietrich in The Blue Angel. Ava Gardner, THE BRIBE Rita Hayworth, GILDA Ann Sheridan, TORRID ZONE Marlene Dietrich, THE BLUE ANGEL Here's one of my favourites for a jazzy night club feel and a hurtin' song, Ida Lupino singing "The
    7 points
  36. A lot of posters here are not fans of Robert Taylor and I can understand why they may find his appeal limited. I find him, at best, adequate in some of his '50s films but far from exciting. However, he was highly effective as a cold blooded killer with a psychopathic hatred towards Indians (okay, okay, indigenous people) in The Last Hunt, a western made in 1956. We're far from the land of noir here, of course, but Taylor's hard boiled coldness in this tale about buffalo hunters could have worked well as a character in a noir study, as well. This film is shown on TCM quite often and is wor
    7 points
  37. The Bribe was a bit of a snoozer for me, but I'm glad you liked it, ElCid. I really like Charles Laughton and Vincent Price, I always enjoy these two superb hams no matter what they're in. Price was really a bad guy in this one. When he first appeared, I saw similarities to his character in His Kind of Woman (friendly, affable, wants the protagonist guy to go hunting or fishing with him....) but that soon changed. I don't think I've ever seen Vincent Price play such a wicked character before ( his Wax Museum and other horror films don't count, since those movies are so over-
    7 points
  38. Lorna, about X, Y, & Zee: Susannah York very earnestly does all the "creating a character" things one might do in an ordinary movie, but you'd think Michael Caine would have taken her aside and said, "Darling, this is a piece of caca and all you have to do is show up and take the money the way Liz and I are doing." So much of Elizabeth Taylor's later career seems to consist of variations on her aging, shrewish, and drunken character in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, but she's no longer getting dialogue by Edward Albee, direction by Mike Nichols, etc. And to follow up on the interest
    7 points
  39. Warm and Healthy Ninety-Seventh Birthday Wishes and Greetings for Madam Eva Marie Saint.
    7 points
  40. I've always thought the chemistry between these two in Raiders was palpable... And for that matter, I've always thought it was there with Ford and Kelly McGillis here in Witness too... (...of course then again, maybe its just in the hats he wore in these two flicks, eh Moe?!)
    7 points
  41. What about Charade? Even Cary Grant was hesitant about that one. I think it works, primarily because she's chasing after him (per Grant's suggestion/requirement for taking the role). But he's definitely old enough to be her father. I was never convinced these two had an affair:
    7 points
  42. This one: The Iron Petticoat
    7 points
  43. Thank you, but I still believe Trump will rank worst eventually, if not now. His performance leading up to the Trump Insurrection alone makes him worst president ever.
    7 points
  44. I enjoyed Eddie Mulller’s intro and outro, as I always do, so I hate to point out a factual error in his SHADOW OF A DOUBT intro. While talking about the interesting and varied group of writers that contributed to the script, Eddie said that writer Sally Benson wrote a book called “Junior Miss” that became the basis for the movie MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS. This wasn’t the case. Benson’s book “Junior Miss” was actually the basis for a play, movie, and radio show of the same name. (By the way, the movie JUNIOR MISS is excellent.) MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS was instead based on Benson’s s
    7 points
  45. Shadow Of A Doubt (1943) was on Noir Alley. This is my favorite Hitchcock film and also in my top ten favorite films of all time. One thing I liked about it is the killer, Uncle Charlie is one of the most unlikely villains in movies up to that time. He is a well dressed, charming gentleman so no one would suspect. His niece, also named Charlie, adores him and when she finds out the truth, her whole world is shattered. Both of them feel that they more than uncle and niece, more like twins. But Uncle Charlie is the dark side whereas Young Charlie is sweetness and light. We first meet Uncle
    7 points
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