Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Members

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/04/2014 in Posts

  1. Yes I would agree that the clip makes the weight of the time period disappear. Most people went to movies to escape and this would have been in that same vein. I believe that it made light of the world around them and that even money was not to be taken too seriously. The reply "yes I am tryng to lose weight" when the doorman told him he gave him a 5 pound note emphasized the frivolity of the film. The fact that Miss Held flitted back and forth in her decision to meet or not meet Florence Ziegfeld and her decision being influenced by the beauty of the orchids and not even knowing who he wa
    38 points
  2. Oh goody! Lubitsch is my favorite director. Scott Eyman's biography of him was very illuminating as to what went into "the Lubitsch touch." Eyman essentially described the unique character of Lubitsch's direction or the "touch" as portraying the ironies and shocks of mundane life such that the audience could discover and identify with the situations faced by Lubitsch's characters by being drawn into their individual points of view. He was particularly interested in the matter of infidelity. For example, in the "Smiling Lieutenant" in which the corpulent king only discovers his queen is cheatin
    34 points
  3. In Clip 2, it's hard to believe that the Production Code people allowed Gilda Gray to stand up there in her skin tight dress and shimmy so suggestively. The only reason I can think of why they would allow her to do that is that someone sold them on the idea that the message is being sent: "See, this is BAD! This is VERY BAD! Do not try this at home (or anywhere)! Be a good girl like Jeanette MacDonald and you'll get a nice man (like Nelson Eddy) who will take care of you." Yeah, that must be it.
    33 points
  4. HI Everyone. I thought it might be fun to get started with an opening topic for a discussion where anyone who would like to contribute to this topic can, even before we officially begin the course modules on Monday. So, here is a question for anyone to ponder and respond to: what musical have you found yourself watching repeatedly, and what is it about that musical that you believe makes it enticing to you for repeated viewings? Let's start there as a place to explore what musicals provide for us as individuals and as a film community. I would even open this topic to explore what musicals
    28 points
  5. I gave up depression disorder every Tuesday and Thursday. I gave up low self-esteem when I completed each module and passed the tests. I gave up loneliness and isolation every time I participated in discussions, like now. This course has been the best thing in the world for me. I hope they offer another one.
    24 points
  6. 1. Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer. The opening in the White House was specifically designed to form a basis for the theme of the film, that of American Exceptionalism. Up until Pearl Harbor, there were many Americans who felt WWII was a European war and that the U.S. should remain neutral and isolated from the conflict. After Pearl Harbor the movies were asked to lead the way from isolationism to patriotism. This film was designe
    24 points
  7. Casting the great triple threat, Walter Huston, as Jerry Cohan was a stroke of genius. He can match Cagney step for step, scene for scene, and song for song. Cagney does a wonderful job as the stiff-legged, patriotic dancer. (Although Cohan wanted Fred Astaire to play him in the film, Astaire turned it down believing he could not mimic Cohan's rather eccentric, idiosyncratic dance style). As for the other two Cohans, Cagney's sister Jeanne more than fills the bill as his equally stiff-legged sister Josie, (she looks like Cagney, dances like Cagney, and sounds like him too) and Rosemary De Camp
    21 points
  8. On the Town, Holiday Inn, Singing in the Rain. Anything Gene Kelly or Fred Astaire.
    21 points
  9. I just realized it was exactly a year ago today that a long-time member here posted for the last time. His screen poster name was "DownGoesFrazier", but before that, he was known as "finance", and it was mostly under that name that he participated here, for years. The reason I wanted to create a thread about him was this: We regard ourselves, I think, as a community on these boards. The people who post here regularly, who contribute and respond and discuss and share opinions and jokes and ideas on this TCM message board, are part of a group. I know it's just an internet group, we don't re
    21 points
  10. I just wanted to share (I truly apologize if this feels like name dropping) that in the mid 1970s I took tap classes from Gene's Kelly's brother, Fred in Oradell, NJ. One evening, quite to our surprise, Gene showed up at the studio and watched us dance. Talk about intimidating. When we finished - he danced for us. 40+ years later I can still feel the swoon and passion. It was wonderful. He was very generous with not only his time but his feedback and advice.
    19 points
  11. In the canoe, it's obvious they're both attracted to each other, but MacDonald plays to usual character as coy and "girlish". Second clip once again they share similar emotions only this time it's embarrassment. He's embarrassed for her because he knows SHE's embarrassed having to cheapen her performing personality to be hired. And she's embarrassed because he sees her and she knows he knows. Confusing, yes. But it makes sense if you follow it. My sense is that like Astaire & Rogers the studio knew they'd found a winning combo and whether they liked it or not, Eddy & MacDonald
    19 points
  12. 1. Well, straight of the bat I guess we see where the Foghorn Leghorn looney toon got some inspiration with the " I-I-I say..." There's a lot more rat-a-tat-tat to the dialogue vs. listening and responding. It's not really listening and reacting with a line type acting, but more waiting for your line and focusing on the dialogue while also keeping the mood for the scene visually. There's also some jokey puns, e.g. "do you realize you gave me 5 lbs. sir?" from the relatively larger gentleman for that period anyway surprised at how heavily he was tipped, and response "oh, yes, I'm trying to lose
    19 points
  13. I do agree that this certainly takes away the seriousness of the time period. Miss Held didn't really have any idea who had sent her the flowers. She was just overwhelmed with the idea that someone would send them to her. I believe if this film had been pre-code, she would have been dressed in a more scanty costume for her performance. Instead, she was covered from head to toe in a long dress, bonnet, and a parasol.
    18 points
  14. I've been a lifelong film student and my first love was the musical. My parents took me to see That's Entertainment! when I was 8 and from that point on, I couldn't get enough. I think the reason that musicals speak to me is the joy of putting music in all situations. Life would seem less dreary sometimes if it had a beautiful orchestral soundtrack. Most musicls are positive and have happy endings. Everything is resolved and everyone is happy at the end. Real life doesn't provide that so it's a nice escape. I never tire of Fred Astaire. I will revisit any of his films. He is
    18 points
  15. It just so happens that Victor/Victoria happens to be one of my favorite musicals! I’ve seen it so many times, I can act it out! LOL!
    18 points
  16. What do you notice about the Lubitsch touch? The "sly visual wit" is evident in the frustration the woman feels when her husband can't zip up her dress, and she casually goes to the man with whom she has just been caught by her husband to have her dress zipped up. How do the props, the dialogue, and the staging help you understand the character of Alfred (Maurice Chevalier)? One of the more obvious is when he tells the Sylvanian Ambassador that the rumors about him are exaggerated as he is holding a garter in his hand. Based on this scene, what are some of the things you no
    17 points
  17. I love anything with Fred Astaire. Whenever TCM shows his movie I’m there watching! I love his dancing!
    17 points
  18. From yesteryear to modern films, I never seem to grow tired of viewing some titles repeatedly. I grew up watching great musicals such as Gypsy, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Calamity Jane, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Meet Me in St. Louis, Mame and countless others. I should be embarrassed for the number of times i have sat down and viewed The Sound of Music or The Music Man, but with every passing year my fondness for these titles seems to grow.
    17 points
  19. When I watch a movie, any kind, I watch it for the mere pleasure of enjoyment and have a difficult time picking it apart and answering these questions put to us. I read what others are posting and nod yes to myself in agreement to most responses but I don't see those comparisons or ideas until they are brought to my mind. I very much enjoyed all the clips this week and especially Lecture #2 video on "Hallelujah", when Richard Edwards made the statement that King Vidor "created" the roadmap, he did not "follow it" I think that speaks huge volumns. i am finding this course fascinating but
    16 points
  20. Why in the world would Gone with the Wind be any less appropriate for casual viewing than many other films shown regularly on TCM? What about all of the films with blackface musical numbers (e.g. Yankee Doodle Dandy, Swing Time, Babes on Broadway)? What about all of the Westerns that depict Native Americans as savages? What about films in which Asian characters are played by white actors in yellow face? What about films that casually depict acts that would now be construed as sexual assault? What about films that depict black servants or slaves as perfectly happy and content with their se
    15 points
  21. Well, I'm also a black person. And if we remove all the names of people who appeared in racist films or sang racist songs, we may as well just take all names off of all buildings. Because no one is perfect. You could make the argument that the majority of films made, now or them, are racist, sexist, or some other -ist. I think its very simplistic to consider Birth of a Nation (1915) "just a racist film". This film was revolutionary in the technical aspect of filmmaking, of box office, and of turning the film industry into a major business. And I say now because just a few years ago a newe
    15 points
  22. This class has been fantastic! I have enjoyed every minute of the discussions, film clips, podcasts...you name it. I cannot wait for Mad About Musicals II. So much more to cover....The Rodgers and Hammerstein musicals - South Pacific, Oklahoma, Carousel, etc. We hardly touched on the Fox Blondes - Alice Faye, Betty Grable, some Marilyn Monroe. The Sound of Music. There is so much more to cover. Please keep it going!
    15 points
  23. What greater American dream than to be invited to the White House to meet the President? It shows Cohan as an older man at the opening and as he begins to recall his childhood it draws you into his story and life. I think the opening is perfect. I never noticed the American Flag on his lapel until tonight watching the clip or if I did I had forgotten about it. I think the grand stair case he walks up speaks volumes of the White House, the butler welcoming him and speaking of the song Grand old Flag starts you right off in a Patriotic mindset. The part where FDR says "You Irish Ameri
    15 points
  24. Agree, definitely different studios. First, dancing styles. Keeler seems to be using a clog style, something like Riverdance. More of a folk peasant style. Almost like she's tapping, or rather, clomping, in wooden shoes. The banging of the taps is the key sound. Powell is much more in the style of Ann Miller, where the taps are percussive and blend in with the music, more like drumsticks keeping in time with the music. The shoes are lighter; the taps are lighter, with less knee bending, more like ballet or ballroom. Keeler dances in a limited area with a mostly a fixed ca
    15 points
  25. The brighter perspective and the element of escapism is definitely captured in not only the light heartedness of the dialogue and song but also in the opulence and lavishness of the stage costume and the back drop of the dressing room. I expect that orchids would not only have been extremely exotic and outside the realm of the average rural movie goer during the Depression but the sumptuousness of all the crystal and bouquets in the dressing room would have been a visual treat and a glimpse in to a world were flowers cost 1000s of francs and dreams do come true.
    15 points
  26. It's a great question. It is something that we have been looking into. The biggest issue is that the courses do thrive and sustain themselves on the interactions among the students. As my team has designed the courses at Ball State, the Canvas material matters, but we value the legion of film fans who come together as a student community even more - we get tens of thousands of tweets, thousands of message board posts, hundreds of notes on the Padlet bulletin board, we share live tweeting, we come together around Shindig events - so the courses have been designed, like a film festival, around t
    15 points
  27. I think the main four musicals that I always come back to are Cover Girl, On An Island With You, Singin' in the Rain, and High Society, though there are many, many others! I'm trying to think of a theme that connects the four and one that would explain why I keep watching them again and again, and I think it's because they're all visually appealing, are beautifully shot in Technicolor, have talented stars and inspirational songs that help lift my spirits, and have a steady romance that I always end up rooting for. I think you could say that about most musicals, though! ?
    15 points
  28. Damn, I missed that. I am so sick and tired of watching lesbians making out in black and white.
    14 points
  29. We knew it would come one day but when I saw Jakeem's thread title just now I still said, "Aw, NO!" One of the great stars of Hollywood's Golden Age, who appeared in a larger number of my favourite films than most, Olivia de Havilland was an intelligent, sensitive artist who enhanced so many films with her presence. She also had the courage to challenge Jack Warner and the studio system when she took Warner Brothers to court and won in 1944, in what became known as the "De Havilland Decision" for challenging the studios that would place stars under extended contracts whenever they went on
    14 points
  30. Hi Everyone! As we start the course, I will be posting a forum for you to post your responses to the Daily Dose of Delight, which will be available every Monday through Thursday. Here is the first one for Monday. Recall that you watched a clip from The Great Ziegfeld. As you watched it, we were discussing the early beginnings of the movie musical in the historical context. With that in mind, look at the three questions below, as I listed them below the clip on Canvas, and post your thoughts. I look forward to reading your responses/ Here are a few discussion starter
    14 points
  31. ****** ****** ****** ******
    14 points
  32. https://youtu.be/Izcnb_2TlK8 https://youtu.be/YytpfVcyDZg Dr. Ament asked us to compare the dancing styles of Eleanor Powell and Ruby Keeler as seen in the two clips pictured above and included in Thursday's (6/7/18) Lecture notes. So here goes. I'd say the styles reflect the studios. MGM for Powell and WB for Keeler. Powell is all like, "I can dance faster and longer and kick higher than anybody, and I smile the whole damned time, because that's how we do things here at MGM. And we're all about America and the American way and God bless America, that's for sure."
    14 points
  33. 1. The clip starts with Ziegfeld essentially giving money away, showing that he has enough money to not have to care that he is giving it away, and then continues to show what I assume was a relatively wealthy audience. It is safe to assume that during the Depression that was not the norm for most people, so by displaying a lifestyle not available to many it paints a brighter view of life. 2. Other Depression era musicals most likely follow the lives and problems of people who are well off or who are not worrying about work of money, similar to how some of the most popular shows of the 80
    14 points
  34. Like many others - I enjoy a variety of musicals (Sound of Music, Oklahoma, West Side Story, 1776). But I can NEVER turn away from Fred and Ginger - no matter how many times I've seen them. My favorite dance sequence is the first one in Swing Time. So amazing - much of it in one long take! And the way they fly over the little "fence" around the dance floor as if they're floating - lifts my heart! And Fred singing "The Way You Look Tonight" from the same film - so sweet! And I love Fred and Eleanor Powell's "Begin the Beguine" number in The Broadway Melody of 1940. The way
    14 points
  35. Some of my favorite musicals include Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, My Fair Lady, Brigadoon, Camelot, Cabaret, The Wizard of Oz and Funny Girl. Out of those listed, Funny Girl has to be my favorite for many reasons, but mostly due to Barbra Streisand's extraordinary performance. She commands the film as her own and gives every moment on screen her all, resulting in arguably one of the greatest musicals of all time. She is the greatest star! Color is another factor that comes into play with the films I listed. I agree with annsblyth that technicolor adds to the appeal of many musicals, it defin
    14 points
  36. Nanette Fabray has died at the age of 97. "Nanette Fabray (born Ruby Bernadette Nanette Fabares; October 27, 1920 – February 22, 2018) was an American actress, singer and dancer. She began her career performing in vaudeville as a child and became a musical theatre actress during the 1940s and 1950s, winning a Tony Award in 1949 for her performance in Love Life. In the mid-1950s, she served as Sid Caesar's comedic partner on Caesar's Hour, for which she won three Emmy Awards, as well as co-starring with Fred Astaire in the film musical The Band Wagon. From 1979 to 1984, she appeared as Gra
    14 points
  37. It must be the rarely seen version entitled Really All Quiet on the Western Front.
    14 points
  38. Not wishing to draw too much unwanted attention I did fail to notify that I went into the hospital for spinal fusion surgery and just returned from PT/OT rehab yesterday afternoon. All went well, glad to say, and my doctor informs me that wit this type of surgery it can take up to a year to fully recover. Mybe shorter, depending on several factors. So, it'll take some time for me to build the endurance of sitting at my PC and working on a keyboard,so be patient and hopefully I'll be back so to being the same Sepiatone some of you've come to be annoyed with. Whichever, I'm glad to b
    13 points
  39. I had the same reaction you did Tom, Oh No, when I read about her passing. Olivia was a favorite of mine. The Heiress, it's a film I've seen so many times and never tire of it. Olivia de Havilland's performance was brilliant. To Each His Own, another favorite. Anyone would be hard pressed to find a performance of hers that wasn't great. I love her performances with Errol. Her wonderful performance in the touching film Light in The Piazza is a favorite film of mine. I wish she could have stayed on longer. Truly a classy, chic, talented woman, a pleasure to watch on film and she had the
    13 points
  40. ...Dame Olivia de Havilland (born in Tokyo, Japan on July 1, 1916), the living Hollywood legend who celebrates her 104th birthday today. She has resided in Paris since the 1950s. She has been nominated for five Academy Awards. Her recognized roles and movies are as follows (Oscar wins in bold):  Melanie Hamilton Wilkes in "Gone With the Wind" (1939). Best Supporting Actress. Emmy Brown in "Hold Back the Dawn" (1941). Best Actress. Miss Josephine 'Jody' Norris in "To Each His Own" (1945). Best Actress. Virgini
    13 points
  41. (author's note, I was going to post this in the OFF-TOPIC CHIT CHAT FORUM, but, I dunno, it's very politicky there and I think this might've got lost 'twixt the cracks...) this is kind of personal, and i apologize. but i need to get this out in some form somewhere. anyhoo: I have found in life that there seem to be two different forms of the Writing Experience: 1. I get an idea and it SEIZES me MIND and TAKES ROOT so STRONGLY that I overcome hesitation and fear and start to bang it out in SCREENPLAY FORM and then, either 20, 40 or 60 pages in, I realize that I have left th
    13 points
  42. Hi again. I am thrilled with the activity surrounding the first Daily Dose of Delight. Here is the forum for Tuesday's. Recall that you watched two clips from Rose Marie and were directed toward the performances of Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald. Look at the three questions below, as I listed them below the clip on Canvas, and post your thoughts. I look forward to reading your responses. Remember, this Daily Dose is a Star Studies perspective. Here are a few discussion starters (though feel free to come up with your own): What do you notice about
    13 points
  43. I’m not sure I gave up anything, and I didn’t watch all the films; but I gained a new online community full of friendly people with beautiful insights and a unified spirit of collaboration. It’s been a great month! I’m sorry to arrive at the end of the course. Have a great summer, everyone!
    13 points
  44. DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #12 (FROM AN AMERICAN IN PARIS): “Life’s candy and the sun’s a ball of butter. Don’t bring around a cloud to rain on my parade.” (from Funny Girl) 1. All musicals should be more-than-realistic. They should take us where we can’t go ourselves: physically and emotionally. They should leave us wanting to sing and dance through life if only as far as the car in the parking lot. The plot and dialogue should also be heightened and mainly serve to bring us to the next number. The actors should wear their hearts on their sleeves. What was unfortunate about castin
    13 points
  45. Like most people, the Wizard of Oz was the first time I saw Judy Garland perform on film. My first impression was that she was extremely talented singer and performer. These clips confirmed her talent as a singer and performer. It also highlighted her range as an actress. This is not a film but in the Sixties, Judy Garland had a TV show that once again showcased her talents as a singer and performer. Here is a clip. You may want to fast forward through the opening graphic.
    13 points
  46. What do you notice about the Lubitsch touch? How do the props, the dialogue, and the staging help you understand the character of Alfred (Maurice Chevalier)? Several folks (chillyfillyinak and thinman2001) have mentioned the great use of the garter, the gun, the drawer full of guns, the zipper, etc. One thing that I also noticed was the picture on the wall just above the cabinet where the guns were stored. It shows a woman lounging in a diaphanous gown - it seemed almost like a representation of his life with all these women that he's seducing. It's subtle, but it shows that this appro
    13 points
  47. 1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples. The Nelson Eddy character is trying his best to start a relationship with the Jeanette McDonald character. As in many films of that era, the “proper” lady plays hard to get. Then the hero usually has to rescue her. I feel that the overacting in the close-ups made the scenes more comical than romantic. I do like the way he changes the lyrics to his song to make her think there are other women his life. Then in the saloon clip when she becomes the fish out of water, he run
    13 points
  48. 1. I believe that it does. In the clip Ziegfeld throws money around like its nothing. He buys terribly expensive flowers and hands the doorman 5 pounds and then jokes about it. The doorman also appears to have the money to go to the theater, as he talks of seeing the French actress, which I assume means he's seen the show. The actress also speaks of having a choice between the two men, meaning she isn't at all worried about money or position, she's free to see what all of her options are, instead of stuck doing what she knows with make her money and make ends meet. 2. One of the th
    13 points
  49. I have always had a yearly tradition of watching 1776 on the 4th of July. I have always considered 1776 one of the best musicals for learning about American History. The movie is absolutely perfect and so are the actors and the music.
    13 points
  50. Am I alone in finding posters bellyaching about TCM hosts boring? There seems to be a thread of this nature at least once a week. Enough already! In any event, Muller's enthusiasm for his subject is because he loves noirs, and he does his own writing. In some cases he will crib a lot of his own notes from write ups he's done in the past about a film and use them on the air. At least, he did that with The Breaking Point. I assume the Garfield film is not the only time he's done that. Nothing wrong with that, especially since most viewers will not have read his previous write ups on films,
    13 points
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...