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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/18/2021 in all areas

  1. Hoagy Carmichael in The Best Years of Our Lives Having just seen the film again last night, a film with as magnificent an array of performances as any produced during the '40s, I marvelled at the comforting presence that Hoagy Carmichael brought to his small role as the owner of a bar who is also a friend of just returned veteran Harold Russell. Hoagy cares about Russell and is looking out for him in his own laid back way. Hoagy was the kind of friend we all need, at times, and, it occurred to me, Carmichael, never a trained actor, is so natural and perfect in his role. I
    16 points
  2. Can't say enough about Dorothy Malone's performance in the famous "Bookshop" scene in "The Big Sleep:" possible the best pickup (she picks him up) and casual-sex scene in a movie ever. It is all her scene with Bogie just along for the ride (tee-hee). Kidding aside, Malone owns the scene from beginning to end.
    13 points
  3. John Qualen as Muley Graves in The Grapes of Wrath (1940) is one of the great unsung performances by an actor in a minor role IMO. Qualen gives a devastatingly emotional performance that sets the tone and plot for the entire film. I think perhaps this magnificent performance is often forgotten because it comes so early in a great film that offers more and more to the very end.
    12 points
  4. Harry Davenport as the judge in You Can't Take It with You (1938) and again as a judge in The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer (1947) Harry Carey as President of the Senate in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)
    12 points
  5. Actually, the sets are real. It's the hosts that are computer-generated.
    12 points
  6. Movie (Not TV) fans might find it hard pressed to say who, if anyone, they left out this year. I'm sure they'll think of someone. There were people in there I never heard of. Clocking in at 4:55:27 I thought it was a perfect curtain call for those whose work we will continue to enjoy for years to come. Christopher Plummer got the end spot . The video aired about 3 times last night (2021-12-18). Kudos again TCM! Great job of editing all those clips together.
    12 points
  7. Marjorie Main as Humphrey Bogart's mother in Dead End (1937).
    12 points
  8. ...And I don't see the 1951 Alastair Sim version (Scrooge) anywhere on TCM. Bah!! Humbug!!!
    12 points
  9. I return every day to TCM more from force of habit and a love for old movies than I do for brand loyalty anymore. Sadly I feel the TCM I came to know and love is gone forever. Kind of like original Coke. It says Coke but somehow it just doesn't taste the same. Things change. Times change. You grow up and move on. You miss those years of going to the beach every summer with your folks when you were a kid. The beach is still there but now you think about those times with nostalgia. Going there now can never recapture those earlier times. Other people are enjoying that same beach like
    10 points
  10. Roscoe Karns as Oscar Shapeley in It Happened One Night An obnoxious loud mouth, the type of guy you always fear getting stuck beside, with the unforgettable moniker of Oscar Shapely, he is most enjoyably played by Roscoe Karns, a character actor who enlivened so many comedies and dramas (usually as comic support) during the '30s. Frank Capra always let the 'little actors" be the stars of their scenes and this role was a particular highlight in Karns' career. Oscar lets Claudette, trapped in a bus seat beside him, know that he just loves a hot mama that can snap them back at hi
    10 points
  11. Every time I've seen Juano Hernandez in a movie, his, usually supporting or brief, role is incredibly impactful. The three movies that come immediately to mind are "The Breaking Point," "Kiss Me Deadly" and "Young Man with a Horn." He's a major talent. Edit add, just thought of one more, "Trial."
    10 points
  12. The Jungle (1952) Indian Princess Marie Windsor, along with Indian something-or-other Cesar Romero and American hunter Rod Cameron go off in search of prehistoric mammoths who are terrorizing regular elephants. Windsor is almost believable as an Indian, although her bindi disappears halfway through the movie. We do get a gratuitous shot of her in a bathing suit, so I can’t complain. I had a hard time wrapping my head around Romero wrapping a turban around his head, but at least his acting is acceptable. Cameron, on the other hand, is extremely dull. There seem to be several subplots going
    10 points
  13. Today marks the 4 year passing of my dad Bradford Dillman. Fans probably did not know he was a fan of the San Franscico 49ers football team. He was also a scout for the team and was able to go to their training camp back in the day. My dad was born in San Fransico, raised in Santa Cruz California. He is missed but as long as fans remember him, he will live on. It is still my quest to be a guest on the TCM show. I have so many stories to share if audiences would like to hear them.
    9 points
  14. https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/movies/movie-news/peter-bogdanovich-dead-last-picture-show-1235070769/
    9 points
  15. Hayley Mills got an upgrade from the Academy. Congrats! (her original miniature Oscar for Pollyanna was stolen years ago and the mold for the miniature no longer available) Film Academy Surprises Legendary Child Star Hayley Mills by Replacing Her Stolen Oscar On Sunday, Mills was gifted a replacement Oscar by Academy president David Rubin. https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/movies/movie-news/film-academy-surprises-hayley-mills-by-replacing-her-lost-oscar-1235073402/ a sweet moment from Pollyanna with Agnes Moorehead
    9 points
  16. Something I really like about Nightmare Alley is the general seediness of most of the settings ( most, but not all.) I especially enjoy that scene, it's right after Stan has realized he's lost everything and may have to stay on the run for the rest of his life, or at least, for some time. He's in some crummy hotel room, probably near the railway tracks. The bellboy comes to take away his untouched food, asking him why he doesn't want to eat. Stan replies that he's not hungry, but can the kid get him something to drink? The bellboy whips out a bottle of gin. What ?! He just happen
    9 points
  17. The prolific songwriter Marilyn Bergman, who with her husband Alan and others created some of the enduring music of the movies and the pop culture, has died at the age of 93. The Grammy and Oscar-winning lyricist died early Saturday morning at her Los Angeles home. Her 96-year-old husband and her daughter Julie were by her side. According to a representative, Jason Lee, the cause of death was respiratory failure not related to COVID-19. The Bergmans had been married since 1958. They were inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1980. “If one really is serious about wanting
    9 points
  18. Ugh another GREAT that has passed. Love Poitier's performance in EVERY movie I've ever seen him in. Plus, I really love the man he was-fair, honest, creative & insightful. One of my favorite books of all time is his autobiography, THE MEASURE OF A MAN. I've given copies to many people and about half love it while the other half drop off from finishing it. His childhood and young adulthood is ASTOUNDING, so unlike what most Americans can even imagine. He definitely assisted this country's civil rights issues with his intelligence & talent. Thank you Sidney, for all you contri
    9 points
  19. So, I re-watched Repeat Performance the other night. ( My husband hadn't seen it, so watched it with him.) I have to say, it might have been better if I hadn't. I still enjoyed the performances and the sophisticated NYC settings. And I would recommend it to anyone who hasn't seen it, just because I think it's pretty entertaining. Plus Richard Basehart's in it. But for heaven's sake, don't start thinking too much about the plot, or you'll find a lot of holes. I'm not talking about the Twilight Zone -ish wish fulfillment of Sheila's getting to live 1946 all over again, I can go wi
    9 points
  20. Yeah, especially dug Carey as the authoritative but easily amused Senate leader. He helps create an ideal of what we would like the Senate to be. As far as trial judges go, how about essential non-actor Joseph N. Welch in Anatomy of a Murder? (center) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0052561/mediaviewer/rm811475968/
    9 points
  21. This is one of my favorite things in a movie — memorable side characters. They add so much texture to the film! I agree with SHOP AROUND THE CORNER 100% and have always loved the snarky delivery boy— such a memorable performance. I’ve already mentioned in another thread that MIRACLE ON 34th STREET is loaded with these. They show up once or twice or not til the end but you remember them — Thelma Ritter saying “Macy’s Ain’t Got Any”, Jack Albertson in the mail room, the drunk Mrs Shelhammer, the drunk Santa in the parade, etc. But at the end the whole movie is stolen by Gene Lockhart
    9 points
  22. That reminds me, what about Gene Wilder, before he became a star, in his small role when he encountered bank robbers Bonnie and Clyde? It's a marvelous small scene. Here he's threatening to tear them apart. His attitude will change a bit when they turn their car around and start chasing him.
    9 points
  23. Here's the Christmas dinner for this year! Appetizer: Mixed Nuts (1994) Soup: Duck Soup (1933) Main dish: Meatballs (1979) Cold Turkey (1971) Fried Green Tomatoes (1991) Chips (2017) Drinks: Champagne (1928) Cocktail (1988) Tequila Sunrise (1988) Beetle Juice (1988) Desert: Bananas (1971) Wild Strawberries (1957) American Pie (1999) Merry Xmas!
    9 points
  24. TCM will be honoring the late Sidney Poitier on his 95th birthday with a 24-hour tribute. Feb 19 8:00pm In the Heat of the Night (1967) 10:00pm The Defiant Ones (1958) 12:00am A Warm December (1972) 2:00am Cry, the Beloved Country (1952) 4:00am Something of Value (1957) Feb 20 6:15am Goodbye, My Lady (1956) 8:15am Edge of the City (1957) 10:00am No Way Out (1950) 12:00pm Blackboard Jungle (1955) 2:00pm To Sir, With Love (1967) 4:00pm Lillies of the Field (1963) 6:00pm A Patch of Blue (1965)
    8 points
  25. Joan Blondell and Ann Dvorak: great pre-code actresses.
    8 points
  26. I’ve been thinking more about the format changes lately. I really dislike them. I originally thought I’d get used to the changes after a while. I haven’t. Instead, I’ve found them more and more annoying. I’ve also tried to remind myself that the movies are the important thing, and that the format changes are just window-dressing, perhaps the price we have to pay to keep TCM going as the potential audience gets younger and younger. But while I certainly want TCM to appeal to younger folks, I just don’t think the cheesy new graphics and music are likely to accomplish that. I
    8 points
  27. Here are my favorites among the older films (pre-2000) that I watched for the first time in 2021. Please feel free to add your own. 1) Madchen in Uniform (1931) - German melodrama about a new student (Hertha Thiele) at an exclusive all-girls school who falls in love with one of her teachers (Dorothea Wieck). The performances are terrific, and the filmmaking is exquisite, with notable editing and camera work. Understandably controversial on first release. (9/10) 2) Chungking Express (1994) - Director Wong Kar-Wai's romantic tale, told in two parts, about two couple
    8 points
  28. PALM BEACH STORY — here again more Preston Sturges side characters. In this case we have both the hilarious Weenie King and Toto
    8 points
  29. Dismal. The original Ted Turner logos are still the best, they showed classic icons in an artistic & stylized way. People are attracted to beautiful art and it creates a more memorable & favorable "brand". Didn't we all buy merchandise, t-shirts, mugs with those logos? I sure did. I even liked the more modern 60's feel of the FF program: A low lit set behind a host brings depth & interest, creating a "brand" experience. Although it seems corny, I'd love to see classic movie posters displayed on set, even rotating by genre/era/whatever brings drama. There's so mu
    8 points
  30. Haha we often describe someone as a Mr Shapely! Roscoe's handsome lookalike son played Harry Bailey, who raised his glass to his brother George "the richest man in town" Also think George Tobias & Harry Davenport are two great charactor actors. What about Thelma Ritter's two brief scenes in MIRACLE ON 34TH ST? That's when having a funny face or voice is important - makes you memorable in only a few seconds of a scene.
    8 points
  31. Elisha Cook Jr. and Bob Steele in The Big Sleep Both actors shine in small roles in this Howard Hawks production. Cook is "Jonesy," in contrast to his usual low life characters, an honest (or relatively honest) straight shooter who has been around and one of the few characters in the film to have Marlowe's respect. Then there's Bob Steele as Canino, the cold blooded killer. A friend of mine, who used to hang out in the streets, once referred to some drug gang members as having "shark eyes," cold, no expression, people capable of doing anything. Steele has those same expressionless shark e
    8 points
  32. Mary Wickes as the Nurse in The Man Who Came To Dinner
    8 points
  33. Saw her on one of those comedy central "roasts" one night. When she got up to speak, she approached the mic at the lectern without the thick sheaf of notes most the other comics usually did, and for 15 minutes delivered some of the most off color, insulting comments about the "roast of honor" and previous comic speakers, all without ONE profane word or any other gutter level humor. So funny I was actually in TEARS! And all in that wide-eyed, sweet as sugar innocent delivery we all came to know and love. MAN! I was bummed upon learning of her passing. The entertainment business lost
    8 points
  34. I will love them all for the rest of my life. I have loved all of these performers since I was a child. Bless them all!
    8 points
  35. His wife got all the attention and the song, but how about Murray Hamilton as MISTER Robinson in The Graduate? He has two big scenes - a supremely awkward encounter early on when he's giving Benjamin Braddock all sorts of generic fatherly advice blissfully unaware that not one minute earlier his wife had stripped naked and offered herself to Benjamin. Then later on, once he's aware of all that's happened, when he's a wounded soul but also hilariously incapable of communicating with Ben on any human level. If that part is too big, I would offer up Norman Fell from the same movie.
    8 points
  36. No question, that's absolutely the best version. I know it so well, I watched it every year of my life from a little kid to an adult. I figure I know almost every line in it by heart. I don't know why TCM never shows it, must be something to do with "rights", it always is. But I own the DVD, so I can always watch it. Usually on Christmas Eve, with some shortbread cookies and Baileys.
    8 points
  37. Yesterday, TCM showed LADY ON A TRAIN (1945) starring DEANNA DURBIN an unusual noir mystery comedy musical...! Enjoyed it! What a cast! What a VOICE she had! ...DAN DURYEA GEORGE COULOURIS ALLEN JENKINS ... !!!
    8 points
  38. Not to mention Ralph Bellamy, Edward Everett Horton, Elizabeth Patterson, and William Frawley! I don’t remember how I discovered this very entertaining movie — probably found it in a search for Christmas movies. But it’s now one that my wife and I look forward to seeing every holiday season. I really wish Eddie and his Film Noir Foundation could restore Christmas Holiday and arrange for it to be released on disc, as they’ve done with several other worthy films. It’d be great to have both of Deanna Durbin’s Christmas noirs available for convenient viewing.
    8 points
  39. Right now I'm a little more concerned over my area (Toronto GTA) just getting hit with the biggest snow storm in over 40 years. I've shovelled the driveway four times today and all I can say is 'Oh, my aching back!' One more reason why I might be a little less concerned than you, MissW, is that I have discovered it is often possible to find copies of the films that don't make it into Canada on the internet. There's an okay, if somewhat soft, copy of Over-Exposed on You Tube, for instance. I realize you may much prefer to watch a film on television, but it's better than nothing. Besid
    7 points
  40. 1939. 1957 may compete with 1952 as the best movie year of the '50s. Good as it is, though, 1939 is still tops, in my opinion. But I've always thought of 1939 as probably the beginning of the greatest three year run of films in history since 1940 and 1941 were both outstanding years, as well. As a reminder of the quality of the films of those years: 1940: Grapes of Wrath, Rebecca, Foreign Correspondent, Long Voyage Home, The Sea Hawk, The Mark of Zorro, Ghost Breakers, Thief of Bagdad, Fantasia, Pinocchio, The Letter, Bank Dick, The Westerner, They Drive By Night, Boom Town
    7 points
  41. When Joel McCrea's John Sullivan winds up in the chain gang in Sullivan's Travels (1941) he is befriended by a lifer named 'Trusty' played by Preston Sturges regular, Jimmy Conlin.
    7 points
  42. I posted this back in April so I think it's worth repeating: A few months ago I watched an Ellen Burstyn interview and she discussed what is probably one of my favorite scenes in "The Last Picture Show": Burstyn's first Oscar nod came in 1972, as Lois Farrow, mother to Cybill Shepherd, in "The Last Picture Show." it was her first big role in film, with Peter Bogdanovich as director. "We had a scene where I hear my lover drive up. Oh good. My lover's here! And I'm just about to open the door, and my daughter comes
    7 points
  43. I don't think she looks at all like Grace Kelly. However, I have a pretty bad girl crush on Kay, especially in her early roles. I love the husky voice, the pitch black hair, especially cropped and slicked back in some of the early 30s roles, and I don't think there's an actress in Hollywood who had a more beautiful back. During Jewel Robbery, does anyone else wonder when that dress will slip entirely off her shoulders? She was definitely one of the most gorgeous clotheshorses, ever, who can wear a gown cut on the bias or a mannish suit equally well.
    7 points
  44. For those who miss the charm of TCM's old fashioned promos here's a bit of nostalgia for you
    7 points
  45. This is a wonderful and probably inexhaustible topic! A few examples that leap to mind (listed chronologically): • Wilfred Lawson as Alfred Doolitle (Eliza's father) in Pygmalion (1938)--he manages to make the character seem somehow delightful, horrible, and irresistible all at the same time. • Granville Bates as the judge in My Favorite Wife (1940)--he seems almost not to be acting here, but instead comes across as a very specific, believable person, as if he were making up the dialogue on the spot. This is especially impressive considering how staggeringly prolific an actor he was
    7 points
  46. And then there's the sterling performance that actor Ian Keith gives as the down and out alcoholic Pete in the original 1947 Nightmare Alley... (...I've been wondering if David Strathairn's performance as the same character in the recent remake would/could be as good?...and which would be one of the key reasons I would be interested in seeing the new version)
    7 points
  47. Welcome aboard, Carl LaFong, Capital L, small A, capital F, small O, small N, small G, La Fong, Carl La Fong!
    7 points
  48. There are quite a few factual errors in the film .... which I admit was not as bad as I thought it was going to be. Two biggest right off? 1. Lucy is told she got the role in THE BIG STREET (1942) after Rita Hayworth and Judy Holliday were not available. Holliday would never have been considered for a starring role in a film in 1942 and was not a "prominent" player in films until ADAM'S RIB (1949) 2. Lucy is sitting in the RKO office with a big shot. The posters on the wall include TOP HAT, SWING TIME, SUSPICION and STROMBOLI. The last was an Ingrid Bergman film released in 1950
    7 points
  49. Whenever I see the opening of Gold Diggers of 1933 (19-well you know) I try to imagine it on a 30-foot tall screen. That musta been mind blowing. Lotsa stuff to like in the movie. Ginger Rogers disappears after the first few minutes (too bad). But Joanie has the moxie to carry the movie. Seems like one more of those superficial backstage musicals, but it's more than just an excuse for songs and musical numbers. The dialog is snappy, cutting, topical (depressionwise). Ned Sparks has his best moment:
    7 points
  50. I can't help but shake the feeling that the trend in Hollywood right now is to play pop culture figures. If Renee Zellweger can play Judy Garland and get acclaim, then Nicole Kidman figures she can do Lucille Ball and get favorable attention as well. It's also about collecting another multi-million dollar paycheck. I really don't think some of these actresses care about the women they are portraying or how to do right by the fans. After I mentioned Jennifer Lopez, I also thought about how Lou Diamond Phillips was a relative unknown. And he smashed it as Ritchie Valens in LA BAM
    7 points
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