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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/04/2021 in all areas

  1. While perhaps not "playing against type" (which does seem the subject topic in TB's thread here) I have to say the following might be one of the bravest performances in any film I've ever seen... Harold Russell in The Best Years of Our Lives. (...and in a manner of speaking, with Mr. Russell being a non-professional actor but still holding his own in this film against some great professional actors, I believe makes his performance especially brave)
    11 points
  2. For years, he was one of the notable actors who had never received an Academy Award nomination. Then he wound up with three in the 2010s -- all in the Best Supporting Actor category. His 2012 acceptance speech for "Beginners" is one of my all-time favorites.
    9 points
  3. ARIES Dear Aries, you are never one to back down from any sort of confrontation. But you’re now realizing that the best course of action may be to chill out before blowing up at others. This will help you find a moment of peace and then you can more successfully express your fiery and often combustible temper. TAURUS Gossip is circulating in your peer group. Yes, they’re rumors about you. But before you go full speed ahead seeing red, take a step back and breathe. Don’t panic! Find time to think about how you want to deal with these issues. GEMINI You’re
    8 points
  4. https://deadline.com/2021/02/christopher-plummer-dies-91-sound-of-music-all-the-money-in-the-world-star-1234688379/ Christopher Plummer Dies: Oscar Winner & ‘Sound Of Music,’ ‘All The Money In The World’ Star A True Hollywood Legend Christopher Plummer, who starred in The Sound of Music, won an Oscar for Beginners and was nominated for All the Money in the World and The Last Station, peacefully today at his home in Connecticut, his family confirmed. Elaine Taylor, his wife and true best friend for 53 years, was by his side. Lou Pitt, his longtime friend and manager of 46
    8 points
  5. An aside related to this interesting film: Vampyr was funded by Baron Nicolas de Gunzburg, acting in the film under the name of Julian West. Gunzburg was one of the great personages of the 20th century. He was the lover of Oklahoma Territory-born actor Erik Rhodes, who appeared as an Italian in two Astaire and Rodgers films. Gunzburg became a renowned editor of fashion magazines, including Vogue and was a mentor to many designers, including Calvin Klein. They should make a movie about Gunzburg's fascinating and varied life. Julian West in Vampyr Baron Nicolas de Gunzburg (a
    8 points
  6. Okay, I know this topic sounds a bit creepy. But when I was starting college in the early 90s, I had gone to live with my mother's sister and my grandparents (they had two homes next door to each other and I divided my time between both places when I wasn't on campus studying). You could say this is where I developed my love for classic film, because my grandparents watched American Movie Classics every night-- after Wheel of Fortune. LOL And I soon switched my major to film and television. My aunt was a bit peculiar (that's putting it nicely) and she liked to say in front of my
    7 points
  7. I checked out SINNER'S HOLIDAY a WARNER BROS VITAPHONE ALL-TALKING MOTION PICTURE! from 1930 on TCM ON DEMAND. [still THRILLED to PIECES that it's not OSCAR MONTH BTW...] It was worth watching for three things: 1. JAMES CAGNEY in his FILM DEBUT is SEXUAL ELECTRICITY and has, perhaps, one of his most challenging parts and scenes and he is outstanding; EVEN AT THE ONSET, IT'S CLEAR THAT IF CAGNEY IS IN THE PICTURE YOU WERE GONNA GET YER NICKEL'S WORTH!! 2. JOAN BLONDELL in an early role (maybe her first as well?)- she is a brunette but in all other respects, she is 100%
    7 points
  8. Last night I trotted out the old chestnut ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW '76 that I usually have on Halloween because it can easily be interrupted for trick or treaters. This time I watched it through silently like my first viewing in 1976, in a virtually empty, quiet theater. I remember my reaction well, the film adaptation was so dynamic! The movie made the performances intimate (although when seeing the stage show, I was in the front row center) while expanding the experience with the marvelous sets & orchestration. While thrilled it became a Saturday Night Midnight feature at our local
    7 points
  9. Only he can quote Shakespeare in the original Klingon.
    7 points
  10. Just watched PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE (1974) when I was a teenager in the 1990s, this showed up quite a bit on Cinemax, I did not particularly like it, but it was an impactful film and I remembered much of it over the years. It gets some bonus points for working FAUST in to the standard LEROUX story remodeled as a GLAM ROCK FABLE and adding a supernatural element as well... I guess one can only wonder what the result would have been had they cast someone besides PAUL WILLIAMS In what is more or less the lead role as the chief antagonist and villain who is supposed to be sexually irre
    6 points
  11. One less racist One less misogynist One less hateful presence in American Media. Let the racists mourn him--they have a right to cry for their own kind.
    6 points
  12. TCM Programming Schedule Challenge #44 Week of September 25 – October 1, 2022 Sunday, September 25 A Salute to Samuel Fuller 6 AM Park Row (1952) Gene Evans & Mary Welch. Dir: Samuel Fuller. Samuel Fuller Prod. UA, 82 min. p/s 7:30 AM I Shot Jesse James (1949) Preston Foster & Barbara Britton. Dir: Samuel Fuller. UNIV, 81 min. p/s 9 AM Falkenau, The Impossible (1988) Documentary. Dir: Samuel Fuller/Emil Weiss. Michklan World Productions, 52 min. Premiere #1 10 AM Pick-Up on South Street (1953) Richard Widmark & Jean Peters. Dir: Samuel
    6 points
  13. You have to know The Honeymooners to appreciate this cartoon:
    6 points
  14. Not a fan of the Sound of Music either but Austria and the cities of Salzburg and Innsbruck are worth the trip. Using a train to get from the various cities is a breeze and very enjoyable. My wife and I flew into Munich and then took the train to each of these towns staying for 3 nights each. We went in May and while there was a light snow one day, the next day it was sunny and in the 70s. Thus the mountains looked liked they do in the photo. Here is Salzburg: Those hills are alive!
    6 points
  15. there is a large printed illustration of EVERY COSTUME BETTE WEARS IN NOW, VOYAGER, the above is only part of it, i cannot find the entire image to post. you can order a copy on amazon (i think)
    6 points
  16. Mike Henry, the former National Football League linebacker who became the 16th movie Tarzan in the 1960s, died last month in Burbank, California at the age of 84. He reportedly succumbed to complications from Parkinson's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), caused by repeated head injuries in sports. A California native, Henry played college football at the University of Southern California in the late 1950s. He was drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the ninth round of the 1958 NFL draft. After three seasons with the Steelers, he joined the Los Angeles Rams in 1962
    6 points
  17. Much of the daytime schedule on March 31 will be devoted to four overripe, deliciously over-the-top melodramas. I'm not sure how the TCM schedule describes them. I haven't seen Go Naked in the World (love the title and will have to tape it), but I have seen Claudelle Inglish, Two Weeks in Another Town, and Youngblood Hawke. Vincente Minnelli directed a number of fine films, and Two Weeks in Another Town is definitely not one of them. So many talented people, so much campy melodrama. Claire Trevor carries on as if she were Betty Field in Seven Women, and just when I was hoping she would have o
    5 points
  18. Mary is the mother of God, Trump is a mother******.
    5 points
  19. Athos’ Schedule October 16 - October 22, 2022 Sunday, October 16th Challenge #2 “B” Stands for Bad Guys and Gals: A Little Funny in the Head 6:00am Wait Until Dark (1967) Audrey Hepburn, Alan Arkin. Dir. Terence Young. WB. 108 min. (p/s) 8:00am Cape Fear (1962) Gregory Peck, Robert Mitchum. Dir. J. Lee Thompson. UI. 106 min. Noir Alley Repeat 10:00am Brighton Rock (1947) Richard Attenborough, Hermoine Baddeley. Dir. John Boulting. Associated British Picture Corporation. 92 min. (p/s) 11:45am Psycho (1960) Anthony Perkins, Vera Miles. Dir. Alfred Hitchc
    5 points
  20. 5 points
  21. Odds Against Tomorrow — Loved the bar scene with Trapper John. Ryan is so intense. He exudes this inner rage that is so “real”, and he never makes a false move . All the actors are superb. There a few lines of dialogue I thought were affected but not many. I do object to the end of mentioned bar scene. Ryan leaves his glass of beer. Earle would not have left his glass of beer. It always bugs me in movies when someone leaves a drink unfinished, especially in a bar.
    5 points
  22. Read this-it's an excellent book. Several members here have read it & all agree. ISBN: 0679728856, ISBN13: 9780679728856 I buy used through ThriftBooks, who has it for well under $10: ThriftBooks-Genius Of The System
    5 points
  23. Stevo's Schedule TCM PROGRAMMING CHALLENGE #44: “Battle of the B's” Week of October 9-15, 2022 --------------------------------SUNDAY OCTOBER 9TH------------------------------- Films Featuring Wheelchairs 6:00am Night Must Fall (1937) Robert Montgomery, Rosalind Russell, May Whitty. Dir: Richard Thorpe. MGM, 116min. p/s 8:00am Rear Window (1954) James Stewart, Grace Kelly. Dir: Alfred Hitchcock. Paramount, 112min. p/s Noir Alley 10:00am Kiss of Death (1947) Victor Mature, Brian Donlevy. Dir: Henry Hathaway. Fox, 99min. p/s 11:45am Logan (2017) Hug
    5 points
  24. Still has that weird flying monkey smell though. (you never can get rid of it, really.)
    5 points
  25. I had lots of sympathy for the protagonist, seeing the spot he was in, and how one thing led to another, even with the gruesome disposal of the body. But when he wrote that ransom note he lost that sympathy to a large degree. Good to see such a rare and interesting film on Noir Alley.
    5 points
  26. I like this schedule very much! My main concern is how you will break the news to Errol that you are partying down with Moondoggie.
    5 points
  27. SPEEDRACER5's SCHEDULE Sunday, June 5 DAYTIME THEME: CHALLENGE #1: Lucille Ball, Queen of the B's at RKO 6:00am GO CHASE YOURSELF (1938) Lucille Ball, Joe Penner, Richard Lane. Dir. Edward F. Cline. RKO. 75 mins. (p/s). 7:15am THE AFFAIRS OF ANNABEL (1938) Lucille Ball, Jack Oakie, Ruth Donnelly. Dir. Ben Stoloff. RKO. 75 mins. (p/s). 8:30am NEXT TIME I MARRY (1938) Lucille Ball, James Ellison, Lee Bowman. Dir. Garson Kanin. RKO. 65 mins. (p/s). 9:45am BEAUTY FOR THE ASKING (1939) Lucille Ball, Patric Knowles, Donald Woods. Dir. Glenn Tryon. RKO. 68
    5 points
  28. 5 points
  29. I was born 20 years after 1975. I first saw Citizen Kane when I was about 16, and I loved it . It was a masterpiece, a glorious film. It prompted me to dig deeper with movies, and in the decade since I've gone hog wild on watching films, as one can see from my personal viewing page with all 4,592 films: https://letterboxd.com/BCarr95/. (yes, the name on the page is my real name) Admittedly, I have been on a recent run of watching more recent films (largely due to getting through what I need to on Netflix, because I really don't like to subscribe to them more than one month a year, plus a proj
    5 points
  30. Friday, February 19 8 p.m. Gun Crazy (1950). Seeing this who would have thought Peggy Cummins was from Wales. Note to TCM: We get St. Patrick’s Day every year. How about doing something for St. David’s Day, March 1st and celebrate Welsh actors and stories!
    5 points
  31. Yes. It's fine if someone doesn't want to watch old movies, whatever, that's their loss. But to be so proud of the fact that you've placed all these arbitrary restrictions on yourself is mind-boggling. Unfortunately, this tweet has served as a catalyst for all these other hot takes on classic film, including one person (a filmmaker, supposedly) who stated that she doesn't watch any old movies, especially b&w, because they're problematic for their sexism and racism. Then proceeded to say that classic film fans are often elitist towards those who don't care for classic film by jumping on t
    5 points
  32. Another brave performance is the one Dirk Bogarde gives in VICTIM (1961). He portrays a married man who has a homosexual affair and ends up blackmailed. Off camera Bogarde himself was closeted and remained so for the rest of his life, even after homosexuality was decriminalized in Britain. I can imagine that his choosing to do VICTIM was not an easy decision for him to make. He might have feared it would not be well-received and that it could potentially sabotage his career as a leading man in British cinema.
    5 points
  33. Rush's TV studio was up the block from my CBS office on West 57th Street. I met him in the green room when he was waiting to go on the Morning News with Harry Smith. We spoke several times after 60 MINUTES did an excellent segment on him. Rush was a very nice person. He loved broadcasting and he single-handedly rescued AM radio. Every year he hosted a leukemia-thon on his program and raised many tens of millions of dollars. Yes, he often skewered people on pedestals but he always did it with good humor. And when he erred, he always owned up to it. I may not have agreed with his take on every
    5 points
  34. Dustin Hoffman in LENNY (1974) It's never, ever on tv. I'd also put Diane Keaton up there in LOOKING FOR MR GOODBAR (1977) These were made relatively early in their careers, but still, they were tough roles for any actor.
    5 points
  35. I have never understood why we should mourn the passing of someone who was not a good person. Or why we cannot say something about him/her that reflects our real feelings. You think Limbaugh would have had kind words for Obama's relatives if he died. Of course not.
    5 points
  36. WHAT?! No love for Walter here as the drunk bar patron in Earthquake ??? (...I'll bet it's the clothes, ain't it)
    5 points
  37. I loved Track of the Cat (1954) and would love to see it on the big screen. Director William Wellman and cinematographer William H. Clothier know how to use Cinemascope and successfully carry out Wellman's idea to make a "black and white in color" film. Snowy landscapes, black and white inside and out with splashes of color like Robert Mitchum's red coat. This was a pet project of Wellman's, based on a novel by Walter Van Tilburg Clark, who also wrote another novel Wellman had filmed, The Ox-Bow Incident. It's easy to see why some of the early audience expected something else. It's a west
    5 points
  38. More Paramount silents. From skimming that Films of the 1920s list above, movies jumping out at me are "The Sheik", "Miss Lulu Bett", "Moran of the Lady Letty", "When Knighthood Was In Flower", "The Covered Wagon", "The Ten Commandments", "Sally of the Sawdust", "So's Your Old Man", "Stark Love", "Chang", "The Last Command", "The Docks of New York", "The Wedding March", and "The Four Feathers" (which apparently was the last silent film released by a major studio and which co-starred William Powell and Fay Wray).
    5 points
  39. Roman Holiday (1953) TCM 8/10 A newspaperman (Gregory Peck) spends a day in Rome with a runaway princess (Audrey Hepburn) I haven't seen this in years. It takes a little while to get going, it seems the first half has a sedated Hepburn sleeping most of the time. Once she wakes up things really get entertaining. The Rome locations look great even in B&W. My favorite scene is at The Mouth Of Truth. Peck and Hepburn's goodbye scene is one of the most touching I ever saw in a film. Audrey's doe eyes are so expressive and Peck loosens up on his normally stoic persona. I also love how
    5 points
  40. Nothing against Zack Morris – well, actually now that I think about it, he was a total sociopath- but Jessie Spano really needed a GAY FRIEND in the Caffeine pill addiction/Hot Sundae episode. “Girl what the hell is your deal? Oh, caffeine pills? (Sigh) Amateur. Here, Take some of these, I got them from my grandma’s medicine closet. They’re some old Quaaludes she never threw out from the 70s. In about 3 1/2 minutes you’ll be kissing God, And if that doesn’t work, I got some cat tranquilizers I managed to snatch the last time I took the dog to the vet, They’ll take your down to a 6 hon
    5 points
  41. Spaceballs -- Would "combing the desert" count as a journey?
    5 points
  42. D.O.A. (1949) Famous noir about a small time businessman, on vacation in Frisco, who is slipped a lethal slow acting poison in a drink and sets about, in the few days left to him, to find his own murderer. It's an intriguing story idea and if the plot eventually becomes hopelessly complex, the film more than compensates for that with Rudolph Mate's assured direction, great black and white photography and the on location shooting in San Francisco and Los Angeles, with a climax set in the famous Bradley Building. The performances are effective if, admittedly, a little less th
    5 points
  43. SansFin's Schedule for January 9th to January 15th, 2022 General Theme: A week of days. All daytime themes are a nationally or internationally recognized 'Day.' Star of the Month: Zasu Pitts, Thursday Evening Spotlight: Movie Animals: Dogs, Cats, Snakes and Bats. This Week: Cats Bob's Picks, Monday Evening Universal B-Movies, Friday Evening Bad Boy Bank Robbers, Saturday Evening Sunday, January 9th Balloon Ascension Day 6:00 A.M. Flight of the Lost Balloon (1961) Mala Powers, Marshall Thompson, James Lanphier, Dir: Nathan Juran, 91 mins., W.M.J. Productions, P/
    5 points
  44. Rooney made 4 films in 1941, so it was a fairly busy year. He was also involved with Ava Gardner and married her the following year. I suspect that the studio felt the role in Ziegfeld was too small for Rooney to take. The film has an ensemble cast, so why have Rooney in the film, when he could be the lead in a film, which would bring in more overall money to the studio.
    5 points
  45. TCM isn't what it used to be, and it never was. This is what Robert Osborne said in his very very very first introduction on the shiny brand new TCM: Hi, welcome to Turner Classic Movies. I'm Robert Osborne, I'm gonna be your host, right here, as we present some of the best, the--finest films ever made, twenty-four hours a day. We're going to be drawing not only from the great film libraries of MGM and Warner Brothers, but also from other outstanding catalogs, so: Come join us, and see not only great films and stars from the past, but also films from recent years, featuring some of our n
    5 points
  46. The Shanghai Gesture (1941) While it falls short of the peaks in cinema achieved in the early '30s with his series of exotic adventures that featured Marlene Dietrich, The Shanghai Gesture shows that, even with the heavy censorship this film absorbed, director Josef Von Sternberg was still capable of weaving an hypnotic spell over the viewer. Set in the title city, its story features a dramatic conflict between a casino representing a gambling pit of hell versus a wealthy landowner who wants to close it down. Von Sternberg's mastery in creating an atmospheric other world on Hollywood
    5 points
  47. A long time ago he pushed me out of the way in order to get to the bar.
    5 points
  48. Kiss of Death Miracle on 34th Street Marty David and Lisa Goldfinger Wild Strawberries Ed Wood Nashville Lust for Life The Wild Bunch
    5 points
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