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CineSage_jr

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  1. > {quote:title=HollywoodGolightly wrote:}{quote} > > {quote:title=CineSage_jr wrote:}{quote} > > That's certainly true in the case of T.E. Lawrence: at the end of LAWRENCE OF ARABIA you really don't know any more about why he did the things he did than you knew before the film began but, as the saying goes, it's all about the journey (which all dramatic stories are, after all), and not the destination. > > I don't know about that, CineSage. After watching Lawrence dozens of times, including many 70mm engagements, I think I have a pretty good idea why he did the things
  2. To be at least a little fair, Oskar Schindler may just be one of those impenetrable, inscrutable people whose motivations resist dissection or any clear, definitive, final analysis, but he did do what he did, that much is certain, and that makes it notable and worthy of dramatic treatment. That's certainly true in the case of T.E. Lawrence: at the end of LAWRENCE OF ARABIA you really don't know any more about why he did the things he did than you knew before the film began but, as the saying goes, it's all about the journey (which all dramatic stories are, after all), and not the destination.
  3. > {quote:title=laffite wrote:}{quote} > I never forgave Steven for bringing ET back to life...especially after rolling us through the emotional wringer of watching it die. Cheap sentiment is something that Speilberg is good at. Your referring to E.T. as "it" instead of "him" suggests that you're probably immune to Spielberg's patented brand of sentimentality, anyway.
  4. It's a good movie; certainly not a great one. Reviewers, Academy voters and the public in general often allow themselves to be seduced by the nobility of a film's subject matter and intentions; as a result they then tend to be blinded as to the film's cinematic and dramatic failings. Spielberg has demonstrated, throughhout his career, that he is an inveterate Pollyanna, always in search of the happy ending and/or some excuse for taking the edge off material to make it more commercial. His films are dramatically soft and, often, inexcusably sentimental; he is constitutionally incapable of
  5. > {quote:title=movielover11 wrote:} I had read that when Streetcar came out on Broadway in the late 1940's - the lines were wrapped around the block - it was a smash hit....and Jessica Tandy played Blanche Dubois in the Broadway version along with unknown Brando...{quote} The young Jack Palance played Stanley Kowalski in the play's national company, and then replaced Brando on Broadway. Many who saw it with both men, including critics, thought Palance was better than Brando.
  6. The play and film certainly did set the art and craft of acting on its ear when they first appeared but, looked at through the prism of nearly sixty years A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE is increasingly creaky, tired, pretentious drivel. The film is tedious in the extreme, and almost unwatchable today.
  7. I find this very hard to believe. And is this the same Susan Sackett who used to be assistant to Gene Roddenberry?
  8. 110 weeks at a small Manhattan art-house means little. A film can't be considered to have done well until it plays, and draws well, in the vast region between the East and West Coasts.
  9. Too bad its young star wasn't concerned with its eventual success one way or the other. Why is it too bad? Moira Shearer was a dancer, not an actress. Her work in THE RED SHOES, and association with films, in general, all but ruined her career as a serious dancer, since the ballet world had nothing but disdain for the movies. That's what's too bad.
  10. Perhaps it was the NyQuil or the fever, but I found this movie to be eerie in a very strange and unnatural way. It was neither; you've just described all the sublimely eccentric and feverish films by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger.
  11. Except that Cage spells it "Nicolas" (no "h").
  12. All exteriors for THE MOUNTAIN ROAD were filmed in and around Tucson, Arizona; the interiors were done at Columbia Studios in Hollywood. Apart from THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH, the only films Stewart made that were actually filmed outside the United States were NO HIGHWAY IN THE SKY (1951) and the 1978 remake of THE BIG SLEEP, both of which were shot in England.
  13. Liberty Ah, yes: the freedom to oppress without restriction in pursuit of financial gain. Capitalism at its most vigorous.
  14. Bravo! Why not put him on "ignore"? I did. Sure, why not? The Republicans have put climate change, the exploding deficit, U.S. service personnel's need for body armor and effective rolling armor, need for new auto fleet fuel-economy standards, and the lack of any connection between al-Qua'ida and Saddam Hussein and the Iraqi civil war (to cite just a few examples) on "ignore," and look at how well things are going.
  15. and wrote: "We need to bring back sweatshops, child labor, high infant mortality, and can SS, too. People can't produce? TOO BAD" There you go again with Liberal hyperbole... Conservatives are not for the above... But, what they do believe is our people must be freed to create and keep the fruits of their labors without the manacle of government keeping them enslaved. Nor, do they believe the people are sheep who can't reason and make their own decisions. They think too highly of man and society and believe government is best that governs least and let's the people have a f
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