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Genevieveannabelle

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About Genevieveannabelle

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  1. Let's not forget Jeanette MacDonald. It's unfortunate that most of her films were in black-and-white.
  2. Hi Raining Violets, Like you, it's always been my understanding that Universal believed Deanna was an important-enough star to stand on her own. I'm not in any way minimizing her talent or star power or her value to the studio. (Didn't she single-handedly save Universal from complete financial ruin?) I'm just of the opinion that her film career would have been better served, and her movies more interesting, had she been paired -- at least some of the time -- with a leading man who complemented her musically. The 1943 Phantom of the Opera was certainly not the greatest picture ever made, and even Deanna Durbin's presence could not overcome the weaknesses in the script, but I think both the film and Durbin's career would have been enriched had she taken on the role of Christine.
  3. Deanna Durbin as Christine DuBois in The Phantom of the Opera (1943.) Deanna would have been simply gorgeous in this high budget Technicolor film, and her glorious singing voice and sparkling personality... Well, it's a real shame it didn't happen. By 1943, Miss Durbin was no longer a little girl with a remarkable voice, but a young woman with a voice that was remarkable, maturing and trained. Although I've read that Deanna refused the role of Christine, I think "Phantom" would have been a better vehicle for her than some of her other Universal clunkers. I also regret that we were deprived of hearing Deanna sing with Nelson Eddy in "Phantom." I cannot understand why Universal failed to pair the adult Deanna with leading men who could sing. I believe that, had she been employed at any other studio, she would during her career have been made part of a singing "team" or -- at the very least -- paired with a musical male co-star (How 'bout a pianist?) who could have played off and complemented her tremendous talent. The synergy might have been awesome. Message was edited by: Genevieveannabelle
  4. I recorded "Three Smart Girls," "It's A Date," and "Hide-Out" yesterday morning while I was at work. When I played back the films last night, the sound from "It's A Date" and "Hide Out" was not synchronized with the video. (Deanna Durbin's musical numbers in "It's A Date", in particular, were most bizarre.) I can only liken it to "Singin' In The Rain." While the sound problems in "The Duelling Cavalier" sequence in "Singin' In The Rain" were deliberate (and very funny), watching the playback of "It's A Date" and "Hide-Out" last night was not even mildly amusing. I am no certainly no technological genius (or any other type of genius, for that matter), so please bear with me when I ask if anyone else out there in Message Boards Land experienced or observed the same synchronization problem? Many Thanks! Genevieve A.
  5. Marsha Hunt was in Pittsburgh recently? A classic (and classy) movie star in my own backyard, and I didn't even know about it! Sheesh... I would've loved to have seen her!
  6. Thank you, Kyle in Hollywood! Most Gratefully, Genevieve Annabelle
  7. Please, TCM, consider making the Guest Programmer Introductions accessible to viewers who did not get to see them all. I can't tell you how much I looked forward to Renee Fleming's visit with Mr. Osborne. Although I had planned to be home that night to watch, my plans were dashed by a family emergency. Ms. Fleming is an intelligent woman and a great talent. I so much wanted to hear what she had to say. I'm upset that I missed it.
  8. I'm ashamed to admit I hated "The Best Years of Our Lives" the first time I saw it. I was not yet born when the film was made, so I saw it for the first time when I was a teenager. (The film was shown on tv.) I think my youth clouded my perception of the film. About the only character I responded to was Homer, the sailor played by wounded veteran Harold Russell. The other characters and their situations did not resonate at all with this sheltered, self-centered, spoiled kid. What a difference a few years made! When I saw the film again, I was no longer sheltered and spoiled. I had definitely learned some life lessons -- not all of them pleasant. I believe my personal experiences shaded my response to the second viewing. Wyler's film completely blew me away! In addition to the usual yeoman's work from Frederic March, Myrna Loy, and Teresa Wright, Wyler succeeded in getting very, very good performances from Dana Andrews and Virginia Mayo. I'm so glad I made myself watch "The Best Years of Our Lives" a second time. Youth is funny. I remember seeing "Love Story" in the theaters when I was a kid. I cried my eyes out, and I thought it probably the greatest movie ever made. On second viewing years later, I cried my eyes out when I realized how stupid I'd been! The film is a piece of crap!
  9. I'm sorry to hear that you were unable to meet Jeanette, Larry. Did Irene Dunne go with you backstage? I ask because Irene Dunne and Jeanette MacDonald supposedly were good friends.
  10. What always strikes me most about "Flesh and the Devil" is the photography of William Daniels. As I watched the film again last night, I was put off by some of the actors' mannerisms; the stodgy intertitles; and the makeup on the men. So I kept reminding myself, "Get over it...this film is 80 years old!" And as I observed the photographic skill of William Daniels, I kept saying to myself in awe, "'I can't believe it..this film is 80 years old!" It's amazing to me how some elements of a film can seem so dated and other parts seem so fresh.
  11. Forgive me, Larry, but your "When I'm Calling You-ooo-ooo" message got me to thinkin' about this... Did you ever encounter Jeanette MacDonald and/or Nelson Eddy in your days in Hollywood?
  12. I've really enjoyed this discussion about "The Sopranos." lol I would like to recognize one of my favorite sopranos from the movies (and Broadway), Julie Andrews. What a shame that Jack Warner didn't cast her as Eliza Doolittle in the film version of "My Fair Lady." I wonder how her career would have proceeded had she been born ten, 20, or 30 years earlier and had had the benefit (?) of the American studio system. I wonder what movie musical roles from the "Golden Era" she could have performed.
  13. Attention Stanwyck fans and viewers who are fond of holiday movies. The Great Barbara appears on TCM this evening in "Remember The Night." It's a wonderful film; a tale of love and redemption. I heartily recommend it!
  14. I, too, would like to extend my thanks to MGMWBRKO. Your efforts are very much appreciated, at least to this viewer!
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