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Mysterious_Mose

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About Mysterious_Mose

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  1. "The Perfect Set-up" is an entry in the "Crime Does Not Pay" series.
  2. > I have asked George Feltenstien and the film and > video mastering department at Warner Bros to look > into this. Thanks! If you can let us know if you hear anything, that would be wonderful. There are quite a few people that would be interested to see this film saved somewhere else than Moscow. :-)
  3. Thanks. I even have "Dancing Lady" and forgot all about that short being on it. In regards to "Nertsery Rhymes", my guess is that it has also aired more recently. I am pretty sure it is not on any DVD outside of the black and white version that is on the Platinum DVD. At least, I think it's the Platinum DVD. Hopefully, it will air again. The one from the MGM shorts box set is quite faded.
  4. Apparently, these two shorts, one with Ted Healy and his Stooges and the other with Curly Howard, aired on TCM sometime in recent memory. I have these on LaserDisc, but it is my understanding that the ones that aired were of much better quality. I may even have the things archived somewhere tacked onto the end of films I haven't looked at yet. Does anyone remember or have a record of when they aired? Or better yet, the films they followed?
  5. Do you know who in Russia is said to own this print? It's at the Gosfilmofond of Russia, a film library in Moscow.
  6. That is indeed awesome. Especially, if something can be done to rescue this film. As near as I can tell, it is still in Russia. Penn State had the one blurb about it, but I haven't been able to find any more info on it at their web site other than the fact that they apparently have a tape to rent.
  7. Does anyone at TCM know anything about the disposition of the Morton Downey/Dot Lee/Fred Waring film "Syncopation"? This was apparently discovered in Russia in 1997 or so and copies were made. According to the Penn State link below, they had some interest in trying to obtain the film. Does anyone know if they, or anyone else did? This is an historic film in that it was the first "all talking, all singing" film. It was also the first Radio Pictures film AND the first commercial test of the RCA Photophone system. It was also apparently produced before "The Jazz Singer", but released after.
  8. "The River", "The City", and "The Plow That Broke the Plains" (Part 1) are all in the public domain and available for download at http://www.archive.org/index.php.
  9. For any healthy culture to remain intact, a set of standards regarding decency must be established and preserved. I don't have a lot of time right now to get into a discussion about this and what I am about to say is not meant as a personal attack. But, the above statement is a lot of hooey. Who gets to decide what "decency" is. One of the problems with this country is that we are still suffering from the innate insanity of the original Puritans that had all sorts of unhealthy hangups about sex and bodily functions, but who had no complusions about forcing other people to bend to t
  10. I know you say it is a 1940's black and white film, but could it be "Yanks" (1979)? The song "I'll Be Seeing You" is played during the fade to credits and over the credits. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080157/ Other the the film of the same title, IMDB doesn't list that song in any of the soundtrack listings for any other 1940's film. Crosby had the first hit with that one in 1944, I believe, although it had been written in 1938 and recorded in 1940. Tommy Dorsey also recorded it in 1944 with Frank Sinatra doing the vocals.
  11. Thank you so much! My friend will be elated at the news.
  12. > "Most of my acting career was spent on the stage. > However, I did make over 30 films. The first of these > was in an early, part color, talkie. I specialized in > comedy roles and am probably best known for my role > as the mother of another actress in a well known > musical. I am also remembered for a television role, > in which I was involuntarily replaced by another > actress. > > Who am I?" > > > You are: Pert Kelton. > > You were in "Sally" (1929), a part-color musical. > You played the mother of Shirley Jones in "The
  13. Okay. I'll try again. Most of my acting career was spent on the stage. However, I did make over 30 films. The first of these was in an early, part color, talkie. I specialized in comedy roles and am probably best known for my role as the mother of another actress in a well known musical. I am also remembered for a television role, in which I was involuntarily replaced by another actress. Who am I?
  14. I looked in the TCM data base for the figure "82". Sounds like one or the other is wrong. :-)
  15. Does anyone know if these will be airing on Canadian TCM? A friend of mine has recently got TCM and is noticing the lack of RKO films that get aired there. Will this affect the recently restored film too?
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