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nightwalker

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Posts posted by nightwalker

  1. > {quote:title=cujas wrote:}{quote}

    > I was wondering is there a counterpart for men--like malicious males. Or are only women capable of this crime?

     

    There are examples of this in film noir. Two of them are Lawrence Tierney in BORN TO KILL and Robert Young(!) in THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME.

  2. You are probably thinking of 1961's *SHADOW OF THE CAT*, in which greedy relatives murder an old woman whose cat takes exception to this. Several attempts to kill the cat, who knows what happened to her mistress, result in the deaths of the guilty parties. It's not really a comedy, black or otherwise, but the cat is really too cute and cuddly to be very menacing. However, if you can get past that, it's a decent little film.

  3. Yes, I do remember that series. I thought it was a shame that it only lasted part of one season.

    I thought Robert Goulet was pretty good as the American journalist who pretended to go over to the Nazis in the days before the US entered the war. I have the movie I DEAL IN DANGER, which was a feature strung together from some episodes of [/b]BLUE LIGHT[/b].

  4. I've seen it. I agree with you that it's one of the best "spy" type films of World War II, and all the more so because it was based on a true story.

     

    I think my favorite sequence (out of many memorable ones in the film) is the one regarding Holden's friendship with the Jewish businessman. In order to cement his reputation as a turncoat, Holden publicly insults the man, who tells him, "I know there is more to this than you are saying, and I will wait to see what it is."

     

    After the war, when Holden's role as a good guy is revealed, his friend tells him he knew Holden could never just suddenly turn on him the way he did. What makes this so touching is that the Jewish friend had more faith in Holden than his own wife did, who left him!

     

    Well worth seeing.

  5. > {quote:title=jamesjazzguitar wrote:}{quote}

    > Please show me where I posted that comment?

    >

    > I checked all my prior posts on this thread and I never posted what you have above. Remember that when one replies to a post it list the comments of the post being replied to. I assume that is where you got that comment.

     

    It's in your post of 9-24-10, 11:41AM, 2nd paragraph, 1st sentence.

     

    Edited by: nightwalker on Sep 29, 2010 4:46 PM to correct the location information

  6. Here are some interesting tidbits about IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE, which as we all know has also been the subject of some difficulty over its PD status. This is from Wikipedia, but appears to be accurate:

     

    Ownership and copyright issues

    Ancillary rights

    Liberty Films was purchased by Paramount Pictures, and remained a subsidiary until 1951. In 1955, M. & A. Alexander purchased the movie. This included key rights to the original television syndication, the original nitrate film elements, the music score, and the film rights to the story on which the film is based, "The Greatest Gift".[33] National Telefilm Associates (NTA) took over the rights to the film soon thereafter.

     

    However, a clerical error at NTA prevented the copyright from being renewed properly in 1974.[34] Despite the lapsed copyright, television stations that aired it still were required to pay royalties. Although the film's images had entered the public domain, the film's story was still protected by virtue of it being a derivative work of the published story "The Greatest Gift", whose copyright was properly renewed by Philip Van Doren Stern in 1971.[35] The film became a perennial holiday favorite in the 1980s, possibly due to its repeated showings each holiday season on hundreds of local television stations. It was mentioned during the deliberations on the Copyright Term Extension Act of 1998.[36]

     

    In 1993, Republic Pictures, which was the successor to NTA, relied on the 1990 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Stewart v. Abend (which involved another Stewart film, Rear Window) to enforce its claim to the copyright. While the film's copyright had not been renewed, the plaintiffs were able to argue its status as a derivative work of a work still under copyright. It's a Wonderful Life is no longer shown as often on television as it was before enforcement of that derivative copyright. NBC is currently licensed to show the film on U.S. network television, and traditionally shows it twice during the holidays, with one showing on Christmas Eve. Paramount (via parent company Viacom's 1998 acquisition of Republic's then-parent, Spelling Entertainment) once again has ancillary rights for the first time since 1955, while NBC's broadcast rights are licensed from Trifecta Entertainment & Media (which holds television distribution of the Republic/Paramount theatrical library, including the back catalog of DreamWorks, a studio which Paramount owned from 2006?2008).[37]

     

    Due to all the above actions, this is one of the few RKO films not controlled by Turner Entertainment/Warner Bros. in the USA. It is also one of two Capra films which Paramount currently owns despite not having originally released it - the other is Broadway Bill (originally from Columbia, remade by Paramount as Riding High in 1950).

  7. > {quote:title=oldsalt61 wrote:}{quote}

    > The Doolittle Raid movie I remember is "30 Seconds Over Tokyo".

    You are correct about THIRTY SECONDS OVER TOKYO being about the Doolittle raid, but ABOVE AND BEYOND features the scene the OP described in which the commander's wife mistakenly gets a scientist to fix her sink plumbing.

  8. You are indeed. Released in 1950, the film starred David Brian, John Agar and Frank Lovejoy.

     

    It was released on VHS, so if you look around, you may be able to find a copy.

  9. > {quote:title=cujas wrote:}{quote}

    > CV, growing up I liked Errol Flynn very much. But the last thing I remember about him, first hand, was that when he died, he was living with a 13 year-old girl. Guess I was 9 or 10 at the time and thought that was very strange even for Hollywood.

    >

    > But I must say--he did indeed, die with his boots on.

     

    Beverly Aadland, Flynn's last girlfriend, was 17 when he died, not 13.

  10. > {quote:title=cujas wrote:}{quote}

    > CV, growing up I liked Errol Flynn very much. But the last thing I remember about him, first hand, was that when he died, he was living with a 13 year-old girl. Guess I was 9 or 10 at the time and thought that was very strange even for Hollywood.

    >

    > But I must say--he did indeed, die with his boots on.

     

    Beverly Aadland, Flynn's last girlfriend, was 17 when he died, not 13.

  11. Fred, here's a link to an online article which concerns Holmes' use of cocaine in the novels and stories:

     

    http://www.who2.com/blog/2009/01/sherlock-holmes-was-not-really-cocaine.html

     

    As the article states, Homes' use of the drug is only referenced 6 times in the "canon" and the last of those tells us that Watson has weaned him from its use.

     

    Edited by: nightwalker on Aug 2, 2010 1:58 PM to correct a typo in the link

     

    Edited by: nightwalker on Aug 2, 2010 1:58 PM

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