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Brazos

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About Brazos

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  1. Brazos

    Sergeants 3 (1962)

    I have yet to see this movie, but I have walked the ground where some of it was filmed in a place called Paria. It's far off the paved highway, but a really neat outpost to look at. It's been destroyed by floods and vandal's fire, but some really dedicated preservists have always re-built it to look like it did when Sergeant's 3 was filmed there (not to mention a scene or two in "The Outlaw Josey Wales.") Goggle Paria Western Movie Set for some pics and location.
  2. Brazos

    Randolph Scott

    After my big search a couple of years ago for that "town" where Randy filmed some of his westerns, I've found that one of the better places they used for his movies is still very much accessible to tourists at will. Remember the scenes in "The Tall T" that involved a mine and mostly outdoor shots? It's where he kills the bad guys and says to Maureen Sullivan "Come on now.....it's going to be a nice day." Anyway, this and other of his flicks were done in the Alabama Hills (Lone Pine) of California and believe it or not, these sites have changed very little since filming days. Even going back to the earliest movies (such as Gunga Din) you can find where they were shot and it looks the same. A Google search for Alabama Hills will give you a lot of sources. It's great fun.
  3. I'm afraid I'd have to put my money on Sinatra being the model for Buddy Love. Look at the movie more closely and you'll see Jerry's acting is a little edgier than Dean's personality. It's the same brassy demeanor Sinatra had.
  4. Absolute agreement, ma'am. James Garner had that incredulous look about him that seemed to say "Are you going to give me grief or what" to everyone he met, yet every situation was under his total control. I caught myself chuckling as well.
  5. I wouldn't argue with anyone about Randolph Scott's ability to "sit a horse," but I really feel he had some very prominent equals. Joel McCrae was the smoothest rider I've ever seen, nevr letting daylight show beneath him no matter what the conditions. Ditto for John Wayne (thanks to Yakima Canutt's excellent tutoring.) As an interesting side note, I found out this past week that Yakima Canutt was NOT an American Indian, but of European heritage. His first name was actually Enos.
  6. Izcutter, Thank you for the reply. I'm afraid I've researched pretty much all the websites that deal with locations. I'm leaning heavily toward the old Paramount Studios as the site of the western street, but can't find a distinct picture of the street as it existed during Randolph Scotts' filming there. If you have seen the street in a movie you would probably remember it because it was distinguished by a large building (usually identified as a hotel or saloon) that sat back a full block from the camera, showing a block-long street on both sides leading up to it. It was a sizable town and it allowed many camera angles and sweeps that weren't possible in other western streets. Anyway, I'm rambling...lol. Thanks again for your reply.
  7. Help, please, Mr. Mongo. Randolph Scott used a very distinct western town in several of his western movies (e.g. Decision At Sundown). I'm trying to find out where this western street was really located and if it was a separate site (such as Old Tucson) or a backlot western set belonging to a studio.
  8. One of my very favorite sidekicks was Guinn "Big Boy" Williams, especially with Errol Flynn. He was a tough guy, but had the proverbial heart of gold.
  9. Brazos

    Randolph Scott

    Thanks, Gerb, but I've gone that route and even Chuck Anderson of the Old Corral website didn't know the answer. It's becoming an obsession for me because I always liked the look of that "town" and was hoping it still existed on a public tour somewhere such as Mescal orOld Tucson.
  10. Brazos

    Randolph Scott

    During the 50's Randolph Scott made a series of popular westerns and in a few of them he used the same "town" as the various location settings. For example, in "Decision At Sundown" it was the location used for the town of Sundown I've been trying for some time now to find out if this was an actual external site (such as Old Tucson) or simply a backlot of one of the major studios. I sure would appreciate any input or possible url addresses where I might find out. Thanks, pardners!
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