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EdisonMcIntyre

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Everything posted by EdisonMcIntyre

  1. 'Twould be nice if TCM showed more non-U.S. films, period, especially from the decades prior to the 1960s. One problem, I assume, is finding good prints with readable English subtitles. There's also some sensitivity, I gather, about showing, say, WWII films made in Nazi Germany or in Japan -- but proper presentation, with authoritative commentary, should make any Nazi or Japanese propaganda content palatable. We certainly see enough U.S. propaganda from WWII -- why not show the enemy's propaganda to put it all in context?
  2. Yes, that's the end of the film -- falling bomb and fade to black. The End. That's a terrific piece of screen writing, isn't it? "And don't forget the name!"
  3. Interesting topic,but define your terms. By "war film," do you mean just "combat" movies or any film that touches on issues of the war and the miltary? And by "good," do you mean a movie that's merely entertaining, or a film that approaches something like the truth? Also, keep in mind that a lot of movies that are "pro-war," or justify military action (as in almost all the World War II films of the 1940s and 1950s) can still express a "war is hell" theme. I can't think of any serious war film that maintains that war is a totally positive enterprise. (I'm sure someone else can, though
  4. "It is I, Captain -- Ensign Pulver, and I just threw your stinkin' palm tree overboard! Now, what's all this crud about no movies tonight?"
  5. Yes, A BRIDGE TOO FAR (1977). James Caan is the sergeant (Sgt. Dohun), Arthur Hill the doc, and (I think) Nicholas Campbell as the captain whose life Caan saves.
  6. Nothing comes to mind at this point. Any idea as to vintage? Color or B&W? Performers? Nationality? WWII, Korea, Vietnam? Are they soldiers or airmen? Show down or dropped behind the lines? Need more info. Edited by: EdisonMcIntyre on Jan 17, 2011 9:48 PM
  7. "Eagle" (1976) was my first thought, too. Check it out at: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0074452/
  8. I'm not aware that any Japanese-Americans appeared in Hollywood films during the 1942-45 period. The internment of the West Coast's Japanese-American population in 1942 was just about total, and the U.S. government wasn't about to let the Nisei and Issei out of the internment camps to dress up as Japanese soldiers. Moreover, I doubt that, under the circumstances, the Japanese-Americans themselves would have been eager to play such roles. Overwhelmingly, the Japanese characters in World War II-era films -- from extras to featured actors -- are played by people of Chinese, Korean, or Fil
  9. How about "Pineapple butai" (1960), aka "Hey, Pineapple." It's listed at: _http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0253476/_ Also at: _http://ftvdb.bfi.org.uk/sift/title/314836_ Apparently a Japanese production. I found this by searching keywords at IMDB.com. If this isn't the film you recall you can do the same. Also search the net.
  10. THE GALLANT HOURS is a clunky docudrama, but it's salvaged by Cagney's reserved performance and the fact that he actually resembled Halsey (who also would be played by James Whitmore, Robert Mitchum, Kenneth Tobey, Richard X. Slattery, Pat Hingle, and Glenn Morshower -- none of whom looked even vaguely like the admiral). Montgomery (who had directed other films and TV shows, including part of THEY WERE EXPENDABLE (1945, when John Ford was injured on the set), was in the Navy during World War II and obviously had his heart deep in this effort. I don't know when work on the film started, but i
  11. Apparently "Nine Men," a 1943 Ealing Studios production directed by Harry Watt. The cast included Jack Lambert and a young Gordon Jackson, in his third film. See _http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0036204/_ I found this on IMDB.com by using their keyword search. You can also search the title on the internet and find several other references. Thanks for alerting me to this film. I had never heard of it, much less seen it. As the IMDB page points out, it sounds like a British version of "Sahara," right up Sgt. Joe Gunn's alley!
  12. You can find a list of all of Blech's films on the Internet Movie Database: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0088083/ He made a ton of war films. Are you sure the one you're seeking also featured Mitchum?
  13. Fair to whom? Leave Audie alone! Seriously, Huston was drawing on his own WWII experience in making a "modern" version of RED BADGE, and casting Audie and Bill Mauldin was not only a marketing coup but an effort to lend authenticity to a movie that likely would be seen by thousands of WWII combat vets. That a bonafide hero was playing a coward leant a greater degree of realism as well as humanity to the character of Henry. Audie was no great shakes as an actor, and he was wise enough to know that, but his performance in RED BADGE is pretty good, given the limitations of the script.
  14. Could it have been a television episode rather than a feature film? Sounds like something out of COMBAT or THE TWILIGHT ZONE.
  15. Pretty sure that, if it's Peter Falk, the film must be ITALIANI BRAVA GENTE, a 1964 Italian film released in the United States a couple of years later as ATTACK AND RETREAT. The film dealt with Italian soldiers who were involved in the Axis invasion of the Soviet Union, and the film was made in Russia with cooperation of the Soviet government. Falk has a brief part as an Italian Army doctor who volunteers to allow himself to be swapped for a Soviet partisan so that the doctor can travel to a partisan camp to treat a badly wounded Russian. The Soviets are the good guys, the Germans are the ba
  16. To address a number of issues raised in this thread: Re: "Midway" vs. "Tora! Tora! Tora!" -- One thing that bugged me about "Midway" was the introduction of fictional characters and the subplot about Tom Garth's love affair with the Japanese-American woman, Haruko. Although "Tora! Tora! Tora!" is a very clunky movie in terms of storytelling, its creators played it straight as a docudrama and tried to stick rigorously to the facts (allowing for some invented dialogue to explain the facts, etc.). I can't recall that there were any important fictional characters in that film. The people who
  17. Can't pinpoint this film, but here are a couple of ideas: (1) SOMEWHERE IN THE NIGHT, 1946, starring John Hodiak as an amnesic war vet, but doesn't sound like it has a courtroom scene. (2) TIME LIMIT (1957), starring Richard Widmark and Richard Basehart. Definitely a courtroom drama about the aftermath of a Korea POW experience, though I'm not sure how much the amnesia angle figures. (3) SERGEANT RYKER (1963-68), starring Lee Marvin and Bradford Dillman. Another post-Korea POW courtroom drama, but again, the amnesia angle is lacking. If neither of these work, you might try goi
  18. Carl Foreman undoubtedly wanted people to see the film and engaged in some good-old Hollywood-style star casting in hopes that Hamilton, Peppard, Moreau, Mercouri et al. would boost the box office, in both the United States and in Europe. Indeed, without star casting it's unlikely such a grim film project would have found financing. The cast may not be too all tastes, but the actors fit the characters very well. If Foreman had wanted to make a blatantly commercial and audience-pleasing film, he would have created characters who were decidedly more likeable, heroic, and overtly patriotic.
  19. A film ahead of its time. It was released in the U.S. just a few weeks after the JFK assassination, and Americans just weren't in the mood for such an unheroic depiction of GIs in World War II. It showed up on the CBS Late Movie series a few times in the late 1960s, and I think it was on HBO or Cinemax once back in the 1990s. But it definitely has never been available on DVD (or on VHS, as far as I know). Does anyone have any definitive documentation that the U.S. government tried to suppress this film? It definitely was made (in Europe) without the cooperation of the Defense Departm
  20. (1) "The Birdmen," a 1971 made-for-TV film (ABC, I believe), directed by Philip Leacock and featuring Doug McClure, Rene Auberjonois, Richard Basehart, Chuck Connors, Tom Skerritt, Max Baer Jr., Greg Mullavey, Barry Brown. McClure is trying to get Norwegian nuclear scientist out of occupied Europe; they are captured by the Nazis and sent to a mountainside prison where the POWs concoct a scheme to build a glider that will take two men into Switzerland. You can net-search this title with "Doug McClure" and find at least firm that appears to offer it on DVD. (2) "The Birdmen" is based on a tru
  21. I assume by "World War II cinema" you mean only 1941-45 films, You might seek out YOUTH RUNS WILD (1944), which TCM has shown now and then. Not a great movie but one of few (if any others) that tries to portray the strains of the homefront on American families. One of main characters is a teenage girl whose mother works in a defense plant. No A-list stars, however. And if you really want to stretch, look for a WB cartoon entitled BROTHER BRAT (1944), featuring the voice of Bea Benaderet. Hardly A-list. There just weren't that many such films. If you are venturing beyond 1941-45,
  22. Okay, here's one for you film-noir/'50s buffs. I saw this film in a theater c.1955-57. It was B&W, contemporary setting. I recall a scene toward the beginning of the film where a young man was walking across a city street at night, perhaps carrying a suitcase as though he had just gotten off the bus and was seeking a diner. The film ends with a group of people searching along a beach for something of great value, with a slightly comic villain (sort of a stocky, Robert Middleton type) sitting in a boat offshore bemoaning some sort of treasure that's evaded his grasp. That's about all I reme
  23. Okay, here's one for you film-noir/'50s buffs. I saw this film in a theater c.1955-57. It was B&W, contemporary setting. I recall a scene toward the beginning of the film where a young man was walking across a city street at night, perhaps carrying a suitcase as though he had just gotten off the bus and was seeking a diner. The film ends with a group of people searching along a beach for something of great value, with a slightly comic villain (sort of a stocky, Robert Middleton type) sitting in a boat offshore bemoaning some sort of treasure that's evaded his grasp. That's about all I
  24. "Chain Lighthing" is set in the post-WWII years (contemporary with the film); Bogie plays an ex-bomber jockey who turns to test-piloting jets for aircraft mogul Raymond Massey. Eleanor Parker is "the girl." Not a bad movie for its time. It has been released on VHS, but I don't think it's the movie you're seeking.
  25. Wycherly always gets to me as Gary Cooper's mother in SERGEANT YORK, for which she received an Oscar nomination. She was a Brit who didn't make films in this country until she was almost 60, so her credit list is relatively short for her age. Very memorable lady.
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