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fixin2quilt

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About fixin2quilt

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  1. In the TCM short about Spencer Tracy that is narrated by Burt Reynolds, there is a scene with Tracy and Stewart and looks like it's on board a ship of some kind. From what movie does that scene come? Besides "How the West Was
  2. The second one is Paul Douglas. I don't have any information on the other 3, although the first guy looks very familiar. http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0007222/
  3. You can also buy it for $19.95 at http://www.warnerarchive.com I know, YouTube is free, but ... there's something nice about owning the DVD.
  4. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=103229193 Warner Bros. is "opening" their vaults and you can order DVDs from their website. Might be worth it to browse through and see if there is anything there you've been waiting for, or just can't resist. Direct to the Warner Archive: http://www.warnerarchive.com Enjoy!
  5. I hope TCM will play it for you again soon! *s* One thing about it - it's very short - only about 70 minutes or so. I was rather surprised when I saw it not long ago. It is not what you would think of as a "typical" Barbara Stanwyck movie. But then again, it was made relatively early in her career - 1933 - she was SO young, and she is photographed really very beautifully in this movie. Also, it's a little bit more "soap-opera-ish" than some of her later "film noir" features in which she has grown into the more cynical femme fatale type.
  6. I hope TCM will play it for you again soon! *s* One thing about it - it's very short - only about 70 minutes or so. I was rather surprised when I saw it not long ago. It is not what you would think of as a "typical" Barbara Stanwyck movie. But then again, it was made relatively early in her career - 1933 - she was SO young, and she is photographed really very beautifully in this movie. Also, it's a little bit more "soap-opera-ish" than some of her later "film noir" features in which she has grown into the more cynical femme fatale type. In a manner of speaking, it' s a rather unremarkable movie, but it's also interesting because of it's timing - 1933, which is post-WW One and perhaps foreshadowing the coming events of WW Two just a little bit. Anyway, hope you enjoy it when TCM happens to play it again!
  7. I hope TCM will play it for you again soon! *s* One thing about it - it's very short - only about 70 minutes or so. I was rather surprised when I saw it not long ago. It is not what you would think of as a "typical" Barbara Stanwyck movie. But then again, it was made relatively early in her career - 1933 - she was SO young, and she is photographed really very beautifully in this movie. Also, it's a little bit more "soap-opera-ish" than some of her later "film noir" features in which she has grown into the more cynical femme fatale type. In a manner of speaking, it' s a rather unremarkable movie, but it's also interesting because of it's timing - 1933, which is post-WW One and perhaps foreshadowing the coming events of WW Two just a little bit. Anyway, hope you enjoy it when TCM happens to play it again!
  8. I hope TCM will play it for you again soon! *s* One thing about it - it's very short - only about 70 minutes or so. I was rather surprised when I saw it not long ago. It is not what you would think of as a "typical" Barbara Stanwyck movie. But then again, it was made relatively early in her career - 1933 - she was SO young, and she is photographed really very beautifully in this movie. Also, it's a little bit more "soap-opera-ish" than some of her later "film noir" features in which she has grown into the more cynical femme fatale type. In a manner of speaking, it' s a rather unremarkable movie, but it's also interesting because of it's timing - 1933, which is post-WW One and perhaps foreshadowing the coming events of WW Two just a little bit. Anyway, hope you enjoy it when TCM happens to play it again!
  9. You may be thinking about "Ever in My Heart" - Your description sounds like it has much in common with the events of this 1933 Barbara Stanwyck movie. I know that I have seen it on TCM within the last year. http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title.jsp?stid=1441
  10. There's also a very funny Mystery Science Theater 3000 version of that movie. I don't believe it has been released on DVD yet, but there may be some hope for that in the future as they have been releasing some features periodically. I found an IMDB listing that says it can be watched on YouTube. Go to this screen to find the links, or just search on YouTube I guess: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0052289/board/thread/66208638 MST3K RULES!
  11. It may be "You Can't Take It With You" - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0030993/ What do you think?
  12. You're welcome. And the more I think about it, I believe that Esther Smith (Judy) sings the song, and THEN Tootie becomes upset at the thought of the family having to move to New York, runs downstairs and begins tearing up the snow people. Esther runs after her and calms her down, and tells her it won't be so bad for the whole family to go to New York together. Soon after that, Lon Smith (Leon Ames) is seen pacing and thinking about the family's dilemma, and you see Esther walking Tootie back up the stairs and soothing her, calming her down. Then father Lon Smith shouts for all the family to come downstairs so he can tell them what he has decided. So now after thinking about it for a bit, I believe that the snowman destruction scene occurs right AFTER "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas." Silly, I guess, but it bugged me that I couldn't remember that offhand! *g*
  13. Sounds like a scene from "Meet Me in St. Louis" where Tootie (Margaret O'Brien) knocks some snow people apart with some kind of stick like a broom handle or so. This was either right before or right after (as many times as I've seen the movie I can't remember whether it's before or after!) the "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" number sung by Judy Garland. ETA: However, "Meet Me in St. Louis" is not B&W but color. Hmmm ... could it be that in the background it only LOOKS like B&W? I would bet that that's the correct scene. Message was edited by: fixin2quilt
  14. Some people may not know that in addition to being such a good actress, Nina Foch was also instrumental in helping younger aspiring stars get started in the business. Seems that I read about her giving acting lessons and coaching/mentoring young actors where she saw exceptional promise. I'd actually like to read more about Nina Foch, because I have enjoyed her in movies and TV for many years but actually know very little about her, and I reckon that she must have led a very interesting life. Anybody know of any biography or autobiography of her?
  15. Well, I actually watched it again on TCM a couple hours ago and did not see her on it then. I'm sure they can't please everyone, and I really can understand why they leave certain folks out - i.e., they are more well known for TV than movies, etc.
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